The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 21, 2015

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Today’s 1st Reading (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18). On 13-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:16-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:16-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 4:16-30.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 4:16-30. St Joe of O Blog. On Luke and the parallels in the other gospels.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:16-30. Begins at 14.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-11.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-13.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6. Verses 9-11 pending.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 27.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 27.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 27.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:31-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:31-37.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 4:31-37. St Joe of O Blog. On 31-44 and the parallels in Mark & Matthew.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:31-37.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on Colossians 1:1-8. Read lectures 1-1 & 1-2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 52.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 52.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 52.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:38-44.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:38-44.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:38-44.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:9-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 5:1-11.

My Notes on Luke 5:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 5:1-11.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 5:1-11.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:15-20. Lectures 4 & 5 of chapter 1.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 100.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 100.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 100.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 5:33-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 5:33-39.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23. On 21-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:21-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 54.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 54.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 54.

My Notes on Psalm 54:3-4, 6, 8. On verses 3-9.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:1-5.

TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

Next Week’s Commentaries.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 29, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings in the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB. Used in most English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Isaiah 50:5-9a.

Navarre Commentary on Isaiah 50:5-9a.

Word-Sunday Notes on Isaiah 50:5-9a.

My Notes on Isaiah 50:5-9a.

Homilist’s Catechism on Isaiah 50:5-9a.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 116:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 116.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 116.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 116:1-9.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 116.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: James 2:14-18.

Navarre Commentary on James 2:14-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on James 2:14-18.

Word-Sunday Notes on James 2:14-18.

Homilist’s Catechism on James 2:14-18.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Mark 8:27-35.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 8:27-35.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 8:27-35.

Word-Sunday Notes on Mark 8:27-35.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 8:27-35.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Individual sites that focus on one or more of the readings.

Sacred Page Blog: The Paradox of Discipleship. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma give his reflection on this Sunday’s readings.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

PODCASTS:

EWTN Podcast on Mark. Listen to episode 8 which shows the connection between the two-stage healing of the blind man and Peter’s less than clear insight into what it means that Jesus is the Christ.

Father Philips’s Podcast on Mark 8:1-9:8.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief overview of the readings. Usually does a good job of highlighting the major theme(s) of the readings.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Listen to the podcast on Chapters 8-9.

St Martha’s Parish Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings in some detail.

Reflections on the Gospel from St Martha’s Parish. Brief reflection focusing on the gospel.

Father Barron’s Podcast Homily#610: Faith Perfected by Love. A noted speaker and theologian.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Christ, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:43-49

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 29, 2015

Ver 43. For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; neither does a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.44. For every tree is known by his own fruit. For of thorns men do not gather figs, nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes.45. A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good; and an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart brings forth that which is evil: for of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks.

THEOPHYL; Our Lord continues the words which He had begun against the hypocrites, saying, For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; i.e. as if He says, If you would have a true and unfeigned righteousness, what you set forth in words make up also in works, for the hypocrite though he pretends to be good is not good, who does evil works; and the innocent though he be blamed, is not therefore evil, who does good works.

TITUS BOS. But take not these words to thyself as an encouragement to idleness, for the tree is moved conformably to its nature but you have the exercise of free will; and every barren tree has been ordained for some good, but you were created to the good work of virtue.

ISIDORE PELEUS; He does not then exclude repentance, but a continuance in evil, which as long as it is evil cannot bring forth good fruit, but being converted to virtue, will yield abundance. But what nature is to the tree, our affections are to us. If then a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit, how shall a corrupt heart?

CHRYS. But although the fruit is caused by the tree, yet, it brings to us the knowledge of the tree, because the distinctive nature of the tree is made evident by the fruit, as it follows, For every tree is know by its fruit.

CYRIL; Each man’s life also will be a criterion of his character. For not by extrinsic ornaments and pretended humility is the beauty of true happiness discovered, but by those things which a man does; of which he gives an illustration, adding, For of thorns men do not gather figs.

AMBROSE; On the thorns of this world the fig cannot be found, which as being better in its second fruit, is well fitted to be a similitude of the resurrection. Either because, as you read, The fig trees have put forth their green figs, that is, the unripe and worthless fruit came first in the Synagogue. Or because our life is imperfect in the flesh, perfect in the resurrection, and therefore we ought to cast far from us worldly cares, which eat into the mind and scorch up the soul, that by diligent culture we may obtain the perfect fruits. This therefore has reference to the world and the resurrection, the next to the soul and the body, as it follows, Nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes. Either because no one living in sin obtains fruit to his soul, which like the grape nearest the ground is rotten, on the higher branches becomes ripe. Or because no one can escape the condemnations of the flesh, but he whom Christ has redeemed, Who as a grape hung on the tree.

THEOPHYL; Or, I think the thorns and bramble are the cares of the world and the prickings of sin, but the figs and the grapes are the sweetness of a new life and the warmth of love, but the fig is not gathered from the thorns nor the grape from the bramble, because the mind still debased by the habits of the old man may pretend to, but cannot bring forth the fruits of the new man. But we must know, that as the fruitful palm tree is enclosed and supported by a hedge, and the thorn bearing fruit not its own, preserves it for the use of man, so the words and acts of the wicked wherein they serve the good are not done by the wicked themselves, but by the wisdom of God working upon them.

CYRIL; But having shown that the good and the bad man may be discerned by their works as a tree by its fruits, he now sets forth the same thing by another figure, saying, A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good, and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth that which is evil.

THEOPHYL; The treasure of the heart is the same as the root of the tree. He therefore who has in his heart the treasure of patience and perfect love, brings forth the best fruits, loving his enemy, and doing the other things which have been taught above. But he who keeps a bad treasure in his heart does the contrary to this.

BASIL; The quality of the words shows the heart from which they proceed, plainly manifesting the inclination of our thoughts. Hence it follows, For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.

CHRYS. For it is a natural consequence when wickedness abounds within, that wicked words are breathed as far as the mouth; and therefore when you hear of a man uttering abominable things, do not suppose that there lies only so much wickedness in him as is expressed in his words, but believe the fountain to be more copious than the stream.

THEOPHYL; By the speaking of the mouth the Lord signifies all things, which by word, or deed, or thought, we bring forth from the heart. For it is the manner of the Scripture to put words for deeds.

Ver 46. And why call you me, Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?47. Whosoever comes to me, and hears my sayings, and does them, I will show you to whom he is like:48. He is like a man which built a house, and dug deep, and laid the foundation on a rock: and when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and could not shake it: for it was founded upon a rock.49. But he that hears, and does not, is like a man that without a foundation built an house upon the earth: against which the stream did beat vehemently, and immediately it fell; and the ruin of that house was great.

THEOPHYL; Lest any one should vainly flatter himself with the words, Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks, as if words only and not rather works were required of a Christian, our Lord adds the following, But why call you me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say? As if He said, Why do you boast of sending forth the leaves of a right confession, and show forth no fruit of good works.

CYRIL; But Lordship both in name and reality belongs only to the Highest Nature.

ATHAN. This is not then the word of man, but the Word of God, manifesting His own birth from the Father, for He is the Lord Who is born of the Lord alone. But fear not the duality of Persons, for they are not separate in nature.

CYRIL; But the advantage which arises from the keeping of the commandments, or the loss from disobedience, he shows as follows; Whosoever comes to me, and hears my sayings, he is like to a man who built his house upon a rock, &c.

THEOPHYL; The rock is Christ. He digs deep; by the precepts of humility He plucks out all earthly things from the hearts of the faithful, lest they should serve God from regard to their temporal good.

BASIL; But lay your foundations upon , a rock, that is, lean upon the faith of Christ, so as to persevere immovable in adversity, whether it come from man or God.

THEOPHYL; Or the foundation of the house is the resolution to live a good life, which the perfect hearer firmly lays in fulfilling the commandments of God.

AMBROSE; Or, He teaches that the obedience to heavenly precepts is the foundation of all virtue, by means of which this our house can be moved neither by the torrent of pleasures, nor by the violence of spiritual wickedness, neither by the storms of this world, nor by the cloudy disputations of heretics; hence it follows, But the flood came, &c.

THEOPHYL; A flood comes in three ways, either by unclean spirits, or wicked men, or the very restlessness of mind or body; and as far as men trust in their own strength they fall away, but as long as they cling to the immovable rock they cannot even be shaken.

CHRYS. The Lord also shows us that faith profits a man nothing, if his manner of life be corrupt. Hence it follows, But he that hears and does not, is like a man, that without a foundation built an house upon the earth, &c.

THEOPHYL; The house of the devil is the world which lies in wickedness, which he builds upon the earth, because those who obey him he drags down from heaven to earth; he builds without foundation, for sin has no foundation, standing not by its own nature, for evil is without substance, which yet whatever it is, grows up in the nature of good. But because the foundation is called so from fundus, we may not unfitly understand that fundamentum is placed here for fundus. As then he who is fallen into a well is kept at the bottom of the well, so the soul falling away remains stationary, as it were, at the very bottom, as long as it continues in any measure of sin. But not content with the sin into which it is fallen, while daily sinking into worse, it can find no bottom, as it were, in the well to which it may fix itself. But every kind of temptation increasing, both the really bad and the feignedly good become worse, until at last they come to everlasting punishment Hence it follows, Against which the stream did beat vehemently. By the force of the stream may be understood the trial of the last judgment, when both houses being finished, the wicked shall go into everlasting punishment but the righteous into life eternal.

CYRIL; Or they build upon the earth without foundation, who upon the quicksand of doubt, which relates to opinion, lay the foundation of their spiritual building, which a few drops of temptation wash away.

AUG. Now this long discourse of our Lord, Luke begins in the same way as Matthew; for each says, Blessed are the poor. Then many things which follow in the narration of each are like, and finally the conclusion of the discourse is found to be altogether the same, I mean with respect to the men who build upon the rock and the sand. It might then easily be supposed that Luke has inserted the same discourse of our Lord, and yet has left out some sentences which Matthew has kept, and likewise put in others which Matthew has not; were it not that Matthew says the discourse was spoken by our Lord on the mountain, but Luke on the plain by our Lord standing. It is not however thought likely from this that these two discourses are separated by a long course of time, because both before and after both have related some things like or the same. It may however have happened that our Lord was at first on a higher part of the mountain with His disciples alone, and that then he descended with them from the mount, that is, from the summit of the mountain to the flat place, that is, to some level ground, which was on the side of the mountain, and was able to hold large multitudes, and that there He stood until the crowds were gathered together to Him, and afterwards when He sat down His disciples came nearer, and to them, and the rest of the multitude who were present, He held the same discourse.

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Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:15-17

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 29, 2015

To help provide context this post opens with Fr. Callan’s summary of 1 Tim 1:1-20 followed by his comments on verses 15-17.

GREETINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS TO TIMOTHY
A Summary of 1 Timothy 1:1-20

St. Paul left Timothy in charge of affairs in the Church of Ephesus as he himself made a journey into Macedonia. Timothy was young, delicate in health, and naturally timid; and there was reason for apprehension as to how he might get on with the false teachers at Ephesus, if St. Paul was long delayed in returning to him. The Apostle, therefore, decided to send a letter to him. In the opening section he first greets his beloved son (1 Tim 1:1-2); then repeats the warning against false teachers he had given before leaving
him (1 Tim 1:3-11), citing his own conversion on the road to Damascus as an instance of the power of the Gospel to assist Timothy in his work and to correct the erring teachers (1 Tim 1:12-17); and terminates by reminding the youthful bishop of the charge that has been committed to him as a true teacher of the doctrines of Christ (1 Tim 1:18-20).

1 Tim 1:15. Faithful is the saying, and worthy of all acceptation that Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners, of whom I am the chief.

Faithful is the saying, i.e,, worthy of all belief. This is a formula peculiar to the Pastorals; it is found elsewhere in these letters in 1 Tim 3:1 and 1 Tim 4:9 below, in 2 Tim 2:11, and in Titus 3:8, It is used to introduce a truth of great importance.

And worthy of all acceptation, i,e, worthy to be accepted by everyone. The Greek for this expression is found again in the Bible only in 1 Tim 4:9 below.

That Christ Jesus came, etc. This is the great truth the Apostle
would teach, and it shows that the primary purpose of our Lord’s
coming to the earth in the Incarnation was to save sinners.

Of whom I am the chief, a characteristic expression of St. Paul (cf. 1 Cor 15:99; Eph. 3:8), and not so much hyperbolical as expressive of a vivid appreciation of the degradation of sin, on the one hand, and the awful holiness of God and the preciousness of grace, on the other hand; and the Apostle is not speaking in the
past but in the present tense. It is only the great Saints who can
rightly apprehend sin and appreciate grace.

1 Tim 1:16. But for this cause have I obtained mercy: that in me as first Christ Jesus might shew forth all patience, for an example to them that shall believe in him unto life everlasting.

The Apostle explains why God has shown him so great mercy in spite of his sins, namely, that he might be an example or illustration to others of the “patience,” i.e., the longsuffering and gracious mercy of Christ in bearing with all poor sinners who “believe in Him,” the consequence of whose faith in Christ Jesus will be “life everlasting.”

In me as first, i.e., as chief of sinners (ver. 15).

An example. Literally, “an outline sketch.” The Greek word is found only here and in 2 Tim. 1:13 in the whole Bible.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 timothy 1:15-17

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 29, 2015

This post opens with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief summary analysis of 1 Tim 1, followed by his comments on verses 15-17. Text in purple represents his paraphrase of the Scripture he is commenting on.

A SUMMARY ANALYSIS OF 1 TIMOTHY CHAPTER 1

In this chapter, the Apostle, after the usual Apostolical salutation (1 Tim 1:1-2), renews  instructions which he gave Timothy, on leaving Ephesus (1 Tim 1:3), to denounce certain false teachers, who had altogether mistaken the aim and object of the law, of which they constituted themselves the expounders (1 Tim 1:4-7). He guards against the calumny, with which he was often charged, of being the enemy of the law itself (1 Tim 1:8), and points out the end for which the law was given (1 Tim 1:9-11) He gives thanks to God for having called him to the sacred ministry, notwithstanding his unworthiness (1 Tim 1:12-17) And, finally, he recommends Timothy to attend to the precepts contained in the entire chapter (1 Tim 1:18-20).

1 Tim 1:15 A faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the chief.

It is a certain, undoubted truth, and worthy to be received with all thankfulness and gratitude, that Christ Jesus came into this world for the purpose of saving sinners, of whom I am the greatest and most unworthy.

He says, this mercy shown himself, should inspire all other sinners with hope, and hence he announces a general and important proposition on the subject. “Of whom I am the chief.” This he might say, looking to himself, and abstracting from the sins of others—or, by looking to his own nature without grace, there was no sin ever committed, that he too might not commit, if left to himself.—(See Philip. 2:3).

1 Tim 1:16 But for this cause have I obtained mercy: that in me first Christ Jesus might shew forth all patience, for the information of them that shall believe in him unto life everlasting.

But it was on account of this very excessive unworthiness and sinfulness, that Christ Jesus showed mercy to me, selecting me as a great object of mercy, for the purpose of displaying in me, the most unworthy of sinners, his great patience and compassion, and with a view of making me serve as a great exemplar and model for all future penitents who are to believe in him, and by this means, expect eternal life.

“For the information of them that shall believe,” &c. The Greek for “information,” ὑποτυπωσιν, means, to serve as a type or model, so that, after his example, all future sinners who are to believe in God, would have recourse to the divine clemency, and learn to hope in God, and thus gain eternal life. As a physician, for the purpose of rousing the drooping and desponding spirits of his patient, points to some instance of recovery from a similar and almost incurable disease; so, had God placed St. Paul, whose blindness and obstinacy were apparently incurable, as a model, an example to animate other sinners to hope for forgiveness in the depth of their miseries and sins.

1 Tim 1:17 Now to the king of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

For this, may eternal honour and glory be rendered to the one only true God, the immortal and invisible King of ages.

God is by nature “immortal,” and incorruptible, and “invisible,” he cannot be seen by the aids of nature,—even in the life to come the saints require the lumen gloriæ to see him as he is, “face to face.”—(See 1 Cor. 13:12). “Only God.” In Greek, only wise God. The epithet, wise, is, however, wanting in the oldest manuscripts and versions, and generally rejected by critics.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 28, 2015

TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:24-2:3.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:24-2:3.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:24-2:3.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on Colossians 1:24-2:3. Read the last lecture on chapter 1 and the first on chapter 2.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Colossians 1:24-2:3.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:24-2:3.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 62.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 62.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 62.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:6-11.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 6:6-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:6-11.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: in 2015 this day falls on September, 8, the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. A link to commentaries for that feast is listed first, followed by commentaries for the normal day.

Commentaries for the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 2:6-15.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 2:6-15.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 2:6-15. On 4-15.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 2:6-15. Lectures 2 & 3 on chapter 2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 2:6-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 145.

St Augustine’s Notes Psalm 145.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 6:12-19.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea Luke 6:12-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:12-19.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 3:1-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 3:1-11. On 1-17.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 3:1-11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 3:1-11. Read the first 2 lectures on chapter 3.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 3:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 145.

St Augustine’s Notes Psalm 145.

My Notes on Luke 6:20-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:20-26.

Navarre Bible  Commentary on Luke 6:20-26.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17. On 1-17.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 3:12-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 150.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 150.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:27-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:27-38.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Resources.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Timothy 1:1-2, 12-14.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:1-2, 12-14.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:1-2, 12-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:1-2, 12-14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 16.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 16.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 16.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 6:39-42.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:39-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:39-42.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Timothy 1:15-17.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:15-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:15-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Timothy 1:15-17.

 Father Boylan’s Commentary on Psalm 113.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 113.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 113.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 6:43-49. On 41-49.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:43-49.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:43-49.

TWENTY-FOURTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

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September 8~Commentaries for the Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 28, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings. Note: Today’s first reading allows for an alternate. The Gospel reading allows for a shorter text.

Today’s Divine Office.

Alternate 1: My Background Notes on Micah 5:1-4a.

Alternate 1: Navarre Bible Commentary on Micah 5:1-4a. Note: verse numbering follows the RSV (Mic 5:2-5a).

Alternate 2: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:28-30.

Alternate 2: Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:28-30.

Alternate 2: Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:28-30.

Alternate 2: Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:28-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 13.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 13.

Longer text: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 1:1-16, 18-23.

Longer text: Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 1:1-16, 18-23.

Shorter text: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 1:18-23. Includes 24.

Shorter text: Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 1:18-23. Includes 24-25.

Shorter text: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 1:18-23. Includes 24.

Shorter text: Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 1:18-23. Includes 24.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 22, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings (NABRE). Used in the USA.

Mass Readings (NJB). Used in most other English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Isaiah 35:4-7a.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Isaiah 35:4-7a. Actually on verses 1-10.

Word-Sunday Notes on Isaiah 35:4-7a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 35:4-7a.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 146:7, 8-9, 9-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 146.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: James 2:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on James 2:1-5.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on James 2:1-5.

Word-Sunday Notes on James 2:1-5.

Pending: My Notes on James 2:1-5.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 7:31-37.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:31-37.

Word-Sunday Notes on Mark 7:31-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:31-37.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 7:31-37.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Individual sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Sacred Page Blog: Jesus the Reverse Psychologist. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma give his reflection on this Sunday’s readings.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Wednesday Word.  I’m not sure why it’s called “The Wednesday Word” since it deals with the Sunday readings. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 7:31-37.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on the Gospel.

St Ambrose on the Healing of the Deaf Man. The act influenced ancient baptismal liturgies, and the reading has often been used for baptismal catechesis.

St Anthony the Abbot on Watchfulness of the Tongue.

St Ephraim the Syrian On the Evils of the Tongue and Similar Vices. Go to page 4 of the book displayed (page 26 in the pdf document).

Abuse of Speech. Homily on the Gospel by Fr. Agustine Wirth, O. S.B., a famed preacher of his day.

On Conformity to the Will of God. Gospel homily by Fr. Wirth.

Homily on the Gospel. By Bishop Bonomelli.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Homily Notes on the Gospel.

Spiritual Deafness and Dumbness. On the Gospel.

Healing Spiritual Deafness and Dumbness. On the Gospel.

PODCASTS: Commentaries, homilies, reflections, etc.

Father Francis Martin’s Reflections on the Sunday Readings. A video in 4 parts, each approximately 15 minutes long. The last three deal with the readings, the first is introductory. The link may be time sensitive.

(1) St Martha’s Parish Bible Study Podcast. Usually looks at the readings in some detail.

(2) St Martha’s Parish Bible Reflections.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief overview of the readings. Usually does a good job of highlighting the major theme(s). Text available.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Scroll down and click on the link “chapters 6-7.”

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 15, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings in the New Revised American Bible. Used in the USA.

Readings in the New Jerusalem Bible.  Used in most other English speaking countries. Scroll down slightly to find. For some reason the Epistle reading follows after the Gospel.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Deuteronomy 4:1-2, 6-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Pending: My Notes on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Homilist’s Catechism on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Haydock Bible Commentary on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 15:2-3, 3-4, 4-5.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 15.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 15.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27. On 17-27.

My Notes on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27. On 17-27.

Homilist’s Catechism on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Mk 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Speaking of Scripture Blog. An excerpt from Mary Healy’s Commentary on Mark, part of the new series Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture. Healy is one of the co-editors.

GENERAL RESOURCES: On the readings as a whole. Commentaries on individual readings further below.

Word Sunday. The readings in both and literal translation, notes on the text, podcast, children’s reading.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  I’m not sure why it’s called “The Wednesday Word” since it deals with the Sunday readings. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo’s Parish Bible Study Notes.

Father Francis Martin’s Reflections on the Readings. Week 22 not yet posted. A video in 4 parts, each approximately 15 minutes long. The last three deal with the readings, the first is introductory. The link may be time sensitive.

Update: Faithfulness to the Word of God. From Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma of the Sacred Page Blog.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 9, 2015

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Commentaries for the Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Note in 2015 this day falls on August 24, The Feast of St Bartholomew, Apostle. The first link is to commentaries for that day; the remaining links are for the ordinary readings.

Commentaries for the Feast of St Bartholomew.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10.

Homily 1~St John Chrysostom on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5. On 1-7.

Homily 2~St John Chrysostom on 1 Thessalonians 1:8-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm149.

Patrisitic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:13-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 139.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 139.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 139.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:23-26.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:23-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 139.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 139.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 139.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:27-32.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 90.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 90.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial (Psalm 90).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on  Thessalonians 4:1-8. On 1-12, thus incorporating tomorrow’s first reading as well.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8. On 1-11, thus incorporating tomorrow’s first reading as well.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 97.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 25:1-13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2015 this day falls on the Memorial of the Passion of St John the Baptist. The first link is to commentaries for that memorial. The remaining links are for the regular Saturday.

Memorial of the Passion of St John the Baptist.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11. On 1-11, thus incorporating yesterday’s first reading as well.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:91-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 25:14-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Next Week’s Posts.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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