The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Commentaries for the Fifth Week of Easter

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 23, 2016

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year C

YEAR A: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

YEAR B: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

YEAR C: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

MONDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER
Note: In 2016 this day falls on April 25, the Feast of St Mark the Evangelist. The first link below is to commentaries for the readings of that feast. The remaining links are for the normal readings.

2016. Commentaries for the Feast of St Mark the Evangelist.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 14:5-18.

Update: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 14:5-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 14:5-18.

My Notes on Psalm115.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary John 14:21-26.

St Augustine’s Tractates on John 14:21-26.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 14:21-26.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 14:21-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:21-26. Notes on verses 18-27.

Update: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on John 14:21-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:21-26.

TUESDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 14:19-28.

Update: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 14:19-28.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Acts 14:19-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 14:19-28.

My Notes on Acts 14:19-28.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 145.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 145.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on 145. Site identifies it as Psalm 144.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 14:27-31.

St Augustine’s Tractates on John 14:27-31.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 14:27-31.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:27-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:27-31.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 15:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 15:1-6.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 122.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on 122.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:1-8.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 15:1-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:1-8.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 15:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Haydock Bible Commentary on John 15:1-8. very basic.

Father MacIntyre’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 15:1-8.

THURSDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 15:7-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 15:7-21.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:9-11.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:9-11.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:9-11.

St Augustine’s Tractates on John 15:9-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:9-11.

FRIDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 15:22-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 15:22-31.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 57.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:12-17. On vv. 12-19.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:12-17.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:12-17.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:12-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:12-17.

SATURDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 16:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 16:1-10.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 100.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:18-21.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 15:18-21.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:18-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:18-21.

SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year C

Year A: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

Year B: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

Year C: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

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Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 27, 2016

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Scroll down. Used in most English speaking countries. For some reason the site has the Gospel reading before the second reading.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

My Notes on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Word-Sunday Notes on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 67.

Augustine’s Notes On Psalm 67. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary On Psalm 67. On entire psalm.

Lection Divina Commentary on Psalm 67.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 67.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

My Notes on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23 .

Word-Sunday Notes on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 14:23-29.

St Augustine’s Commentary On John 14:23-29 .

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:23-29.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 14.  Scroll UP slightly to find the beginning of Lecture 6, which starts at 14:22.  Read through Lectures 6-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 14:23-29.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 14:23-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:23-29.

Word -Sunday Notes on John 14:23-29.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Sites which offer commentaries, reflections, summaries,etc., on one or more of the readings in a single post.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines.  Gives the theme(s) of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: Reflection on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

Living Space. Commentary/reflections on the readings.

Glancing Thoughts: Brief reflection on the first reading from philosopher Eleanore Stump.

The Gospel in its Historical Cultural Context. Briefly examines the gospel reading in light of first century Mediterranean culture.

Thoughts From The Early Church. Excerpt on the Gospel from St Bernard of Clairvaux.

Scripture In Depth. Succinct summary of the readings and their relation to one another.

PODCASTS:

Franciscan Sisters Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings in some detail.This Sunday’s episode should be available sometime Thursday.

EWTN’s Gospel of the Holy Spirit (On Acts 15). Listen to episode 8.

St Catherine of Siena’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostle. Video on chapters 13-15.

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostles. Listen to part 8 on chapters 10-15.

Institute of Catholic Culture on Revelation. A three part introductory overview of the book.

St Martha’s Podcast Study of Revelation. On chapters 20-22.

Franciscan Sisters Study of Revelation 21-22.

Part 1: A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On 20-22.

Part 2: A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On 20-22.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John’s Gospel. On chapters 13-14. Click on the POD icon or the direct download link.

Franciscan Sisters Study of John 13:10-14:31.

 

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Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 10

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

THE JEWS MISUNDERSTOOD THE JUSTICE OF GOD
A Summary of Romans 10:1-4

The Apostle protests again (cf. Rom 9:1-3) to the Romans his sincere affection and sympathy for his fellow-Jews. Their failure, he says, is due, not to lack of zeal, but to the error of insisting on their own false notion in preference to the true notion of justice. The theme is the same as in Rom 9:30-33; but, while there he was speaking of Israel stumbling at the stumbling-block, he is here entering into a psychological analysis of the Jewish mind which, in observing the Law, came short of Christ, the end of the Law.

Rom 10:1. Brethren, the will of my heart, indeed, and my prayer to God, is for them unto salvation.

Here St. Paul gives renewed assurance of his abiding interest in the salvation of his fellow-Jews. And yet, their incredulity has put a chasm between him and them, as is evident from the fact that he speaks of them in the third person, while addressing the Romans in the second person as brethren.

The will of my heart (ευδοκια = eudokia), i.e., my strong desire (St. Chrysostom), or my inclination, purpose (Lagrange). The particle μεν (men), not followed by δε (de), is most probably to be used in its adverbial sense of confirmation, meaning here, certainly translated above as “indeed” (Lagrange).

Rom 10:2. For I bear them witness, that they have a zeal of God, but not according to knowledge.

I bear them witness, etc. The Apostle, who had been a zealous Pharisee, and had himself been eaten up with zeal for God (Gal. 1:14; Acts 22:3), was well able to testify to the zeal of his fellow-Jews. They certainly were most assiduous in studying the law of God, but they failed to understand God’s designs. They were at great pains to promote the honor and glory of God, but they were little concerned to scrutinize their own conceptions to see what God’s honor and glory might consist in. Hence their ignorance was culpable. Thus St. Paul (1 Tim. 1:13) blamed his own ignorance, and St. Peter (Acts 3:17) said that the Jews crucified Christ through ignorance.

A zeal of God, i.e., a zeal for the cause of God.

Knowledge, i.e., a profound understanding (επιγνωσιν = epignosin) . Cf. Eph. 1:17; 4:13; Col. 1:9-10; etc.

Rom 10:3. For they, not knowing the justice of God, and seeking to establish their own, have not submitted themselves to the justice of God.

They not knowing, through their own culpable ignorance, the justice of God, i.e., the system of gratuitous justification by means of grace through faith in Christ to come, as the Scriptures had announced (Rom 3:21; 41-25). To receive this grace of justification it was needful that the Jews should recognize themselves as sinners, even like the Gentiles; but they were persuaded that it was necessary for the honor of God to establish their own, i.e., to defend as true justice their own idea of justification, based on the external observance of the Law, and the result of their own personal efforts. Considering this frame of mind we can readily understand how they would not submit themselves to “the justice of God,” i.e., the justification which God communicates to men, which is a gratuitous gift of God dependent upon faith in Christ. Cf. Philip, 3:9.

Rom 10:4. For the end of the law is Christ, unto justice to every one that believeth.

For (γαρ = gar) explains why the submission of the preceding verse was required.

The end, etc., i.e., the purpose of the Mosaic Law was to lead to Christ. All the precepts and ceremonies of the Law were types of Christian mysteries, intended to prefigure Christ and to prepare man for His coming. How far astray, then, were the Jews in trying to establish a system of justification independent of faith in Christ! But Fr. Lagrange and others understand τελος νομου (= telos nomou, “end of the law”) here to mean not that the Law was ordained and led to Christ, or that Christ was its perfection and fulfillment; but that, since the justice of God is now given in Christ, the Law has come to an end, as an instrument of justice, and has no further purpose (cf. also Gal. 3:25). Hence in the first explanation τελος (telos) would mean purpose; in the second, end, or term. We see no reason why both explanations cannot stand.

Law, although without the article in Greek, means the Mosaic Law, as is clear from the context (Lagrange, Cornely, etc.), and not law in general (Weiss, Zahn, etc.).

That believeth. To obtain justification and salvation faith in Christ has at all times been the indispensable means,—in Christ to come under the Old Law, and in Christ already come under the New Dispensation.

THE JUSTICE OF LAW AND THE JUSTICE OF FAITH
A Summary of
Romans 10:5-13

The Apostle speaks in these verses, first of the justice of the Law, as contrasted with the justice of faith ; he then shows that this latter is also necessary for the salvation of the Jews; there is no distinction, both Jew and Gentile must be saved by faith.

Rom 10:5. For Moses wrote, that the justice which is of the law, the man that shall do it, shall live by it

The Apostle quotes Moses (Lev. 18:5, according to the LXX) to show the difference between the justice of the Law and that of faith. If a man is able to obtain the justice of the Law, he will have as his reward, temporal, and even eternal life; but this justice is very difficult, being beyond man’s natural strength.

The justice … of the law, i.e., the justice which resulted from an observance of all the precepts of the Mosaic Law.

The man that shall do it, etc., i.e., the man that is able to do such a difficult thing.

Shall live by it. To the observers of the Law there was promised a life of temporal blessings (Deut. 28:2-13; 30:9-10), and also life eternal (Matt. 19:17; Luke 10:25-28). But to obtain this latter it was necessary to observe, not only externally, but also internally, all the precepts of the Law; and, in particular, to love God and have faith in Christ to come (Deut. 6:5; Matt. 22:36; Rom. 2:13; 4:11)—a task utterly beyond the powers of fallen human nature unaided by grace (Rom 7:22-25). This grace, however, which the Law could not provide, would be given by God in virtue of faith in Christ to come. The Jews erroneously thought they could keep the Law by their own mere natural strength, and thereby obtain the rewards promised.

Wrote should be “writeth,” and scripsit of the Vulgate should be scribit, to conform to the Greek.

Rom 10:6. But the justice which is of faith, speaketh thus: Say not in thy heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? that is, to bring Christ down;
Rom 10:7. Or who shall descend into the deep? that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead.

To show that the justice of faith, unlike that of the Law, is not difficult to obtain St. Paul here personifies it, and makes it address man in the words of Deut. 30:11-14. These words, in their primary and literal meaning, refer to the Law of Moses, the precepts of which were not difficult to understand; but in their accommodated sense, here made use of by the Apostle (Calmet, Beelen, Cornely, etc.), they relate to the justice of faith,— to Christian faith, which is comparatively easy to obtain, involving no such insurmountable difficulty as ascending into heaven, to bring down Christ, the object of faith ; or descending into the deep, i.e., into the grave, to bring up Christ again from the dead, i.e., to believe that Christ, the object of our faith, descended there. As Moses told the Hebrews that it was not necessary “to ascend into heaven,” or “go over the sea” in search of the Law which was indeed very near to them; so here the Apostle, accommodating the words of the Prophet, says that, since Christ descended from heaven and became incarnate once, and likewise once died, was buried and rose again for our salvation, it is not necessary that we should try either to ascend into heaven or descend to the abode of the dead to work out the redemption which Christ already has wrought for us. Since, therefore, the two fundamental mysteries of our redemption, the Incarnation and the Resurrection, have already been accomplished for us, our justification is easy, provided we have proper faith in God through His incarnate and risen Son.

The words of Deut. 30:13 (“which of us can cross the sea”) are here somewhat modified by St. Paul (“who shall ascend into the deep”), in order to render more vivid the contrast between heaven and the abyss, and better to accommodate the words of Moses to Christ’s burial and Resurrection from the dead.

Rom 10:8. But what saith the scripture? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart. This is the word of faith, which we preach.

The word scripture is wanting in Greek, and is considered a gloss. This verse is the positive complement of the thought of the preceding verses. Justice personified is still speaking. It is not necessary to seek salvation afar off, it is very near. It consists in a word which must be received by faith. As Moses said the word, i.e., the Law, was nigh and easy to understand; so, says St. Paul, it is with the word of faith, which we preach, i.e., the Gospel truths that are necessary for salvation. These words, through the preaching of the Apostles, are carried to all in such a way that all may have them in their mouth and in their heart, without the necessity of long journeys or grave fatigue.

In the Vulgate scriptura should be omitted; justitia, understood from verse 6, is the subject of dicit.

Rom 10:9. For if thou confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and believe in thy heart that God hath raised him up from the dead, thou shalt be saved

The Apostle explains yet more clearly what is required in order to have part in the salvation of Christ. Not only is it necessary to believe, but thou must also confess with thy mouth, i.e., make public confession that Jesus is Lord (the literal order) of the universe, and therefore truly God. This means a public confession of Christ’s Divinity, such as was required before Baptism (Acts 8:37; 16:31). Further, besides believing and confessing the Incarnation of the Son of God, it is necessary to believe in His Resurrection from the dead. Paul mentions these two mysteries because they are the principal ones of Christianity, those on which all others depend. If he speaks first of external, and then of internal faith, it is only because he is following the order of Moses’ words, which speak of the mouth first, and secondly of the heart.

Rom 10:10. For, with the heart, we believe unto justice; but, with the mouth, confession is made unto salvation.

St. Paul here returns to the natural order and speaks first of internal belief, and then of external profession of faith.

With the heart, etc., i.e., the internal act of faith is the beginning and foundation of justification.

We believe. More literally, Faith is formed (πιστευεται = pisteuetai), i.e., a state of faith is formed on our part, as the present tense indicates. The phrase εις δικαιοσυνην (eis dikaiosynen), and not εις δικαιοσιη (eis dikaiosin), shows that one attains real justice, and not a mere declaration of it, just as salvation will be really possessed (Lagrange).

Confession . . . unto salvation, i.e., salvation will follow upon our faith and justification, provided we persevere to the end of life in the justification we have received, and do not fail to make at times external profession of our faith. Again the present tense, ομολογειται (homologeitai = “confession”), marks a state of justice, and not a mere act, on man’s part. Of course, justification, if ever lost through mortal sin, can always be regained by a proper use of the Sacrament of Penance.

Rom 10:11. For the scripture saith: Whosoever believeth in him, shall not be confounded.

The New Dispensation is one of faith which gives to all the same rights to salvation. This doctrine of faith, however, is not new, having been already announced by the scripture, i.e., by Isaiah 28:16. St. Paul had previously (Rom 9:33) quoted these same words of the Prophet; but here he adds the word πας (= pas), whosoever, to the text of Isaias, in order to express more clearly the universality of salvation through faith.

In him, in the context of Isaias, refers to the “corner-stone,” which was a figure of Christ.

Shall not be confounded, because through faith in Christ we are reconciled with God and have a firm hope of attaining salvation.

Rom 10:12. For there is no distinction of the Jew and the Greek: for the same is Lord over all, rich unto all that call upon him.

There is no distinction, etc. The Apostle had used the same argument, only more openly, to prove the universality of salvation in Rom 3:29. There he said God was the God of the Gentiles as well as the Jews; here he insists that both have the same Saviour. 

Lord means Jesus Christ (Comely, Lagr., etc.), and not God the Creator, as some of the older commentators thought, because there is question here of faith in Christ. Jesus is the κυριος παντων (= kyrios panton, “Lord over all”), as in Acts 10:36; Philip, 2:11. 

Rich unto all, because by His death Christ has provided an infinite treasury of merits (Eph. 3:8) which He holds at the disposition of all, on condition that they call upon him, i.e., that they believe in Him with their hearts and confess Him with their mouth (verse 10).

Rom 10:13. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord, shall be saved.

St. Paul appeals to the Prophet Joel 2:32 to prove that whosoever will call upon the name of Jesus shall be saved. The same text from Joel was quoted by St. Peter in his sermon to the faithful on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:21). The Apostle applies to Christ what Joel had said of Yahweh, which is a clear proof of the Divinity of Jesus.

THE JEWS REFUSED TO BELIEVE IN THE GOSPELA Summary of Romans 10:14-21

In these verses St. Paul shows all that God has done to lead the Jews to the faith. He has shown already (verse 3) that they misunderstood the justice of God, although it was easily within their reach to grasp and understand, if only they would have had faith (verses 6-13). Now he goes on to prove that they could have made this act of faith, and that if they have not done so, it is manifestly their own fault. Faith should be supported by authorized preaching, and such preaching faith has had, as Isaias proves. But all have not believed. Yet they have heard and understood, and it is their own fault if they have not believed. Cf. St. Chrys., Lagr., h. 1. 

Rom 10:14. How then shall they call on him, in whom they have not believed? Or how shall they believe him, of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear, without a preacher?
Rom 10:15. And how shall they preach unless they be sent, as it is written: How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things!

In the preceding verse it was said that invocation of the name of Christ was necessary for salvation. But to invoke a person, it is first necessary to believe in him; and to believe, one must first have learned. One learns through preaching, provided the preaching be duly authorized and reliable. These conditions being presupposed, there is no reason for not believing.

Preaching, therefore, is the ordinary means of learning the truths of faith; but it must be done by those who have the proper authority and the right to preach : there are many pseudo-apostles and pseudo-prophets (2 Cor. 11:13; Titus 1:11). God, of course, is free to make known the truths of salvation otherwise than through preaching, if He wishes, but that would be something out of His ordinary way of acting.

How shall they believe him, etc. The Vulgate querm non audierunt, corresponding to the Greek ου ουκ ηκουσαν (hou ouk ekousan = “whom they have not heard”), would seem to suggest that those who had not heard Christ could not believe in Him. But ηκουσαν (ekousan = “heard”) with the genitive sometimes means in classic Greek to hear of or about a person (Cornely). Our English translation, “of whom they have not heard,” is therefore correct, and the Vulgate should read, de quo non audierunt. At any rate, the fact that very few who were then living had seen Christ or heard Him was an argument for the necessity of duly authorized preachers, Apostles, envoys of Christ.

Unless they be sent, i.e., by God, either directly, as was St. Paul himself, or indirectly, through the authority constituted by God, as are all those who receive their commission from the Apostolic body and Church instituted and empowered by Christ. This Apostolate which, through its preaching, is to convert souls to Christ, had already been foretold by Isaias 52:7. The citation is more according to the Hebrew than the LXX. The Prophet’s words refer literally to the messengers who announced the fall of Babylon and the return of the Jews from captivity; but in their mystical sense, as here used by St. Paul, they have reference to the preachers of the Gospel. 

Of them that preach the gospel of peace is an addition to Isaias which is not found in the best Greek MSS. 

Glad tidings, etc., literally refers to the announcement made by the messengers of whom Isaias spoke, but figuratively, to the preachers of the Gospel of Christ. 

Rom 10:16. But all do not obey the gospel. For Isaias saith: Lord, who hath believed our report? 

Although the Gospel was preached, St. Paul here affirms that generally, especially by the Jews, it was not obeyed. He says all do not, etc.; better, “all have not,” etc., simply to soften, as much as possible, the sad truth of Jewish indifference and obduracy. This deplorable fact of disobedience to the Gospel and to the preaching of the Apostles was foretold by Isaias 53:1, whom St. Paul cites almost literally according to the LXX. The word Lord is added to the citation. Isaias was about to describe the passion and humiliation of the future Messiah, and he cried out full of anguish and fear, who will believe what I am going to announce? How few they were who afterwards did believe in the Messiah we are told by St. John 12:
37, 38. 

Our report literally means “our hearing,” i.e., our preaching, what they heard from us.

To conform to the Greek the obediunt of the Vulgate ought to be obedierunt. 

Rom 10:17. Faith then cometh by hearing; and hearing by the word of Christ.

As said above (verse 14), faith cometh by hearing, i.e., by preaching, according to God’s ordinary Providence, and hearing, i.e., preaching, comes by the word of Christ, i.e., by the commission and mandate of Christ given to the Apostles and their successors (Cornely), or by the word revealed through Christ (Lagr.).

Rom 10:18. But I say: Have they not heard? Yes, verily, their sound hath gone forth into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the whole world.

St. Paul anticipates an objection or excuse on the part of the Jews. Will they, i.e., the Jews, say they have not heard the preaching of the Gospel? That they certainly have heard it, he proceeds to prove by a quotation from Psalm 19:4, cited according to the LXX. The Psalmist is speaking of the glory of God being declared by the heavens; and St. Paul, accommodating the text to his purpose (Cornely, Zahn, etc.), says that as the heavens declare everywhere the glory of the Creator, so has the preaching of the Gospel been heard everywhere in the world. Hence there is no excuse for the incredulity of the Jews. 

All the earth and the ends of the whole world are obviously hyperboles, used to express a great truth. The Apostle merely wishes to say that the Gospel was then widely known in the Roman world, and so could not be unknown to the Jews (cf. Acts 1:8).

Rom 10:19. But I say: Hath not Israel known? First, Moses saith: I will provoke you to jealousy by that which is not a nation; by a foolish nation I will anger you.

Another objection is forestalled and refuted by the Apostle. It having been proved that the Jews had heard the Gospel preaching, could it be that they would say that they did not understand it? That is impossible; for the Apostle adduces certain texts from the Old Testament (Deut. 32:21) in which it had been foretold that the Gentiles, far less prepared than the Jews, would understand and embrace the faith ; from which it follows that the Jews could not plead an obscurity in the preaching of the Gospel that would excuse their failure to understand.

Hath not Israel known? i.e., have not the Jews understood (ουκ εγνω = ouk egno)? There is question here of the Jews understanding that which they had heard, namely, the Gospel.

First, Moses, i.e., God through Moses first, in order of time among the inspired writers, threatened the Jews on account of their obstinacy in not understanding, that is, in rendering homage to “that which was no god” (Deut. 32:21), i.e., to an idol; and He told them that He would incite them “to jealousy and anger” by bestowing first temporal, and later spiritual blessings upon that which is not a nation, upon a foolish nation, i.e., the Gentiles. The pagans were called “not a nation,” i.e., an inferior nation, as compared with the religious and moral standard of the Jews. They were looked upon as “a foolish nation,” i.e., as almost incapable of understanding the things of God; and yet they understood the preaching of the Gospel which the Jews, with all their superior privileges and divine assistances, did not grasp and obey. The words of Moses found their entire fulfillment when the Jews were rejected and the spiritual blessings of the Messiah were conferred upon the Gentiles.

Rom 10:20. But Isaias is bold, and saith: I was found by them that did not seek me: I appeared openly to them that asked not after me.

St. Paul now cites Isaiah 65:1, whose words clarify the obscurity that might lurk in Moses’ words of the preceding verse. God is speaking through the Prophet.

Isaias is bold, i.e., outspoken, without regard for the sensibilities and prejudices of his fellow-Jews.

I was found, etc., i.e., I permitted myself to be discovered, through the preaching of the Gospel, by the Gentiles that did not seek me, i.e., that were wrapped in the darkness of idolatry, and that consequently neither knew Me nor adored Me.

I appeared openly, through the same preaching of the Gospel, to them, i.e., to the Gentiles, that cared not for Me, nor desired My revelation. How much more, therefore, should the Jews have known and understood the Gospel message! In their failure to do this how great was their culpability!

Rom 10:21. But to Israel he saith: All the day long have I spread my hands to a people that believeth not, and contradicteth me.

Isaiah 65:2 is here cited directly against the Jews. It was said in verses 19, 20 that if a people that did not know God have recognized Him in His manifestations, much more should Israel have known and understood His messages. And why has Israel not recognized and understood the revelation of God in the Gospel? Simply because it was incredulous and resisted God’s proffered gifts, because of its continual disobedience and opposition to God. On the part of God there were invitations the most tender; on the part of Israel, obstinate refusal. St. Paul is not retracting what he said in Romans 9 about the designs of God ; he is picturing here the problem under the aspect of the responsibility incurred by human wills deaf to the call of God (Lagrange).

To Israel. The preposition “to,” προς (= pros), according to modern interpreters should rather be concerning, with regard to. “To,” however, sufficiently renders the meaning of the Vulgate ad and of the Greek προς (pros), in the present instance.

All the day, etc., i.e., God at all times, like a loving father, stretched out His arms and desired to embrace Israel, but in vain.

To a people, etc., i.e., to Israel, incredulous and rebellious. Throughout its history Israel was unfaithful and rebellious to the law and will of God, but its obstinacy and disobedience became most manifest when it rejected the Messiah and His Gospel. To itself alone, therefore, is due Israel’s exclusion from the Messianic kingdom. Cf. Matt 23:37; Luke 11:15; John 8:48; 9:10, etc.

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Video: The New Commandment and the New Creation (Fifth Sunday of Easter)

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

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The New Commandment and the New Creation: The Lectionary Readings Explained (The Fifth Sunday of Easter)

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

In this video, Dr. Pitre discusses Jesus’ new commandment and the new creation as found in the readings for the Fifth Sunday of Easter in Year C.

Source: The New Commandment and the New Creation: The Lectionary Readings Explained (The Fifth Sunday of Easter)

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Commentaries for the Feast of St Mark the Evangelist

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 23, 2016

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Peter 5:5-14.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Peter 5:5-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Peter 5:5-14.

Newman’s Sermon for the Feast of St Mark.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Pending: My Notes on Psalm 89:2-3, 6-7, 16-17.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 16:15-20. Originally posted for the Ascension, includes verse 14.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Mark 16:15-20. Originally posted for the Ascension. Begins with verse 14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 16:15-20.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Peter 5:5-14

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 23, 2016

This post opens with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief analysis of 1 Peter 5 followed by his comments on the reading. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the Scripture he is commenting on.

AN ANALYSIS OF 1 PETER CHAPTER 5

In this chapter, the Apostle addresses himself to the pastors of the Church, and points out the mode in which they should tend the flocks committed to their care, and acquit themselves of their pastoral functions. They should, in tending their flocks, shun three vices directly at variance with their exalted calling; these are, firstly, the performance of their functions not cheerfully, but with restraint arising from the necessity they were under of procuring thereby the necessary means of support, so opposed to the cheerfulness which springs from viewing their flocks, according to God; secondly, the base vice of sordid avarice, so opposed to liberal and generous disinterestedness (2); and thirdly, domincering pride, so opposed to the example of humility, which every pastor is bound to give (3). By avoiding these vices and practising the opposite virtues, the pastors will merit to obtain, on the day of judgment, from Jesus Christ, the unfading crown of eternal life (4).

He next points out the reciprocal duties of the laity towards their pastors. They should be subject and obedient to them.

All, both pastors and people, should clothe themselves with humility, as their chief ornament (5). He tells them to humble themselves before God, in order that he may exalt them, by the effusion of the heavenly graces which he has in store, only for the humble—and, this humility they should manifest, by laying aside all anxious cares, and casting themselves on the Fatherly Providence of God (6, 7). He, next, recommends them to practise the virtues of sobriety and vigilance—two virtues most necessary for a soldier on guard, in order to defeat the stratagems and assaults of a powerful and subtle foe, such as the devil, the sworn enemy of man, is. They should courageously resist him, by the unshaken firmness of their faith (8, 9). He next promises them the powerful protection of God to guard them, and bring them to a happy end (10).

He closes the Epistle with informing them, that Silas is the bearer of this Epistle to them; they will thus be secured against the imposition often practised by false teachers, in substituting counterfeit Epistles. He ends with the usual salutation.

1Pe 5:5 In like manner, ye young men, be subject to the ancients. And do you all insinuate humility one to another: for God resisteth the proud, but to the humble he giveth grace.

In like manner, do you, both inferior clergy and laity, fulfil the reciprocal duty of obedience and subjection to your bishops and pastors; and I enjoin you all, both pastors and people, to manifest feelings of humility towards one another, making this great fundamental virtue your chief exterior ornament; for, God resists the proud, but to the humble he giveth grace.

He new points out the duty which the people reciprocally owe their pastors; and this is subjection and obedience. This is the peculiar virtue of persons placed under authority; the other virtues the people may learn from the lives and conduct of their pastors, who should be a “pattern to them from the heart” (verse 3). “Ye young men.” The laity, who are contrasted with the “ancients,” or pastors. He calls them “young men,” because generally younger in age than their pastors, who, in the time of St. Peter, were far advanced in life, when vested with the pastoral dignity. Others understand by “young men,” young persons in general, who ought to be reverential towards those, who are advanced in life. The former interpretation is more probable; for, all young men are not bound to be “subject” to the old, as is here required. By the “ancients,” are meant the pastors of the Church, especially the bishops, to whom both laity and inferior clergy should be subject and obedient. The word, viewed according to etymology, only means persons advanced in age; but in almost all languages, men vested with authority, whether in church or state, are designated by words expressive of age; because, those appointed to such offices were, generally speaking, far advanced in life. For instance, the terms, Senate, Patricians, &c., though according to etymology referring to age, are employed, according to present usage, to express office or dignities. In many instances, to adhere strictly to etymology would be silly in the extreme, as is apparent, for example, in the original etymological signification of the word, Pontiff, which means “a bridge-maker” (Pontifex), “Episcopus,” bishop, which meant originally, “an inspector.” “Deacon” originally meant, a “waiter;” “Apostle,” “one sent,” &c. “But, do ye all insinuate humility to one another.” The Greek is, “but do ye all (subordinate to one another) put on humility as an exterior garment.” The Greek word for “insinuate,” εγκομβωσασθε, means, put on as the exterior garment covering all the rest, or, as the fibula closely knotting together the other virtues; hence, it means to put on humility, as their chief habit or ornament. This applies to both pastors and people. The word, subordinate, or subject, is not found in either the Alexandrian or Vatican MS. “For God resisteth the proud,” &c. This sentence, quoted by St. James also (4:6), is taken, as to sense, from the Book of Proverbs (3:34). It is translated by St. Jerome from the Hebrew: “he shall scorn the scorners,” which is in substance the same as, “he shall resist the proud,” for, the “proud,” scorn and deride others, “and to the meek he will give grace,” in substance, the same as “he shall give grace to the humble;” for they are generally meek and forbearing.

1Pe 5:6 Be you humbled therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you in the time of visitation:

Be ye, therefore, humbled under the powerful hand of God, that he, who gives his grace to the humble, may, after having copiously showered down upon you his graces, exalt you in the day when he shall come to judge the world, to separate the sheep from the goats:

With all humility, therefore, and fear, walk in the presence of God, whose powerful hand is raised to humble and depress the haughty. “That he may exalt you in the time of visitation;” that, after having bestowed on you here the gifts of grace in store for the humble, he may bestow on you hereafter the crown of everlasting glory, when he shall come to judge the world. The words, “of visitation,” are wanting in the Greek, which run thus: ἶνα ὑμας ὑψωση ἐν καιρῷ, that he may exalt you in the time, that is, in his own good time, or at a befitting opportunity. This entire passage is very like the passage of St. James (4:6 and 10).

1Pe 5:7 Casting all your care upon him, for he hath care of you.

Casting aside all anxious care, and placing your trust in him; for, he has charge of you.

These words express the humiliation of ourselves, which the Apostle inculcates (verse 6), “under the mighty hand of God.” They involve the full resignation of ourselves and all our concerns into his adorable hands. They are perfectly similar to the words, Psalm 54:23, “Cast thy care upon the Lord and he will sustain thee,” and most probably, the Apostle quotes the words of the Psalmist. Of course, in this the Apostle prohibits neither the exercise of prudent foresight nor the employment of our active faculties, to bring about our ends. He only prescribes to us, after having done according to the rules of human prudence what in us lies, to leave the result of our undertakings in the hands of God, and to conform ourselves to his adorable will; for, he will dispose of us better than we could ourselves either divine or anticipate; even the crosses, trials, and privations, so opposed to our natural inclinations, are, in the gracious designs of his Providence, so many visitations of his mercy, weaning us from things of earth, and fixing our desires on things heavenly and eternal. We should, therefore, cast aside all undue anxiety in the several concerns of life, placing all our undertakings in the hands of God. “Oculi mei semper ad Dominum, quoniam ipse evellet de laqueo pedes meos.”—(Psalm 25)

1Pe 5:8 Be sober and watch: because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour.

Be sober and temperate in the use of meat, drink, sleep, and the other comforts of life, and be also vigilant; for, the sworn enemy of your race, by whom sin was first introduced into this world, the devil, the calumniator of mankind, is always on the alert, going about, like a roaring, hungry lion, seeking for some object of prey.

“Be sober.” The Greek word for this, νηψατε, is rendered watch (4:7); it means either “to be sober” or “vigilant,” but here it must be rendered “be sober,” because the following word signifies only “to watch,” or “be vigilant.” “Be sober,” that is, “temperate in the use of meat,” &c., “and watch.” Vigilance is an accompaniment of sobriety, as drowsiness and sleep are of intemperance. Similar is the precept given (Luke, 21:34):—“Take heed to yourselves lest, perhaps, your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting and drunkenness, and the cares of this life.” Sobriety and vigilance are most indispensable for a soldier, while engaged in warfare and on guard, against the attacks of a wily and dangerous enemy. Such is the state of every Christian, during the whole course of his life. “Because your adversary,” the sworn enemy of man, by whom sin and death were first introduced into this world (“Satan,” or “accuser,” is the Hebrew word for “adversary.”) “The devil,” which means, calumniator; hence called (Apocalypse, 12) “the accuser of our brethren,” for, he always endeavours to make men enemies to God and render them deserving of accusation before him. “As a roaring lion,” the strongest and most furious animal in nature, “goeth about,” seeking for some weak point of attack, in order to avail himself of the weakness of our nature and of that passion in particular, to the gratification of which we are most prone; hence, commonly termed, our predominant passion. “Seeking whom he may devour.” When drowsy and sluggish from the effects of intemperance, we are most exposed to the attacks of this powerful and subtle enemy. Hence, the Church commences the concluding hour of the divine office, Complin, with the words of this verse, in order to remind her ministers of the necessity of temperance and vigilance, at the close of the day, for resisting the temptation of the devil. From this passage we may clearly see the great power of the devil, this prince of the “principalities and powers and spirits of wickedness in high places,” with whom we are constantly engaged in deadly conflict.—(Ephes. 6) Job assures us there is no power on earth equal to the devil: “There is no power on earth that can be compared with him, that was made to fear no one.”—(Job. 12:24).

1Pe 5:9 Whom resist ye, strong in faith: knowing that the same affliction befalls, your brethren who are in the world.

Whom resist ye courageously, firmly grasping the shield of faith, bearing in mind that the same crosses that befall you are borne by your brethren all over the earth, who join you in filling up what is wanting in you to the sufferings of Christ.

“Whom resist ye, strong in faith.” In the panoply or full suit of spiritual armour, which St. Paul wishes the Christian warrior to put on, “faith” is marked out as the shield for resisting “all the fiery darts of the most wicked enemy.”—(Ephesians, 6:16). Here, St. Peter wishes the Christian warrior first to “resist” the enemy, and to do so firmly and bravely. “Strong in faith,” the Greek word, στερεοι, means, solid and fixed in faith, it may be allusive to a fortification, wherein they are protected; or, more likely, the idea is the same as that conveyed by St. Paul—“taking the shield of faith”—by which is meant the consideration of the truths of faith, the menaces and hopes which they propose to us. Under “faith,” is included the great confidence in God, which the consideration of the principles of faith is so calculated to inspire, and which will secure us against all our enemies. “If God be with us, whom shall we fear?” “Knowing that the same affliction” (in Greek, τα αυτα των παθηματων, the same afflictions) “befalls your brethren,” &c. Deriving consolation from the consideration, that in suffering, you are only conforming to the decrees of God’s providence, wishing that all his elect should enter heaven by the road of suffering; and hence, nothing peculiarly difficult in their case, all “their brethren who are in the world” are treated similarly.

1Pe 5:10 But the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory in Christ Jesus, after you have suffered a little, will himself perfect you and confirm you and establish you.

But God, the source and author of every good gift, who, out of his pure and gratuitous mercy, has called us through the merits of Jesus Christ, to a participation in his eternal glory, and has given so many pledges thereof by his grace, will himself bring you to consummate and perfect glory, and confirm and establish you unalterably in its eternal enjoyment, after you shall have borne comparatively light and trivial crosses, for a short time here below.

“But the God of all grace,” from whom proceed all gratuitous gifts, “who hath called us unto his eternal glory.” The Alexandrian and Vatican MSS. have, ὁ καλεσας ὑμας, called you. Among his gratuitous gifts is to be reckoned our call to a share in his eternal glory, of which he has given us an earnest in the manifold graces he bestows upon us, “in Christ Jesus.” This call, and the graces consequent on it, are all owing to the merits purchased by the blood of Jesus Christ. “After you have suffered a little.” “A little,” probably refers both to the duration of their sufferings, “for that which is at present momentary and light,” &c. (2 Cor. 4:17), and the comparatively light nature of them. “The sufferings of this time are not worthy to be compared with the glory to come.”—(Rom. 8:18). “Will himself perfect, confirm, and establish you.” In some Greek copies the words are read optatively, thus: “may he perfect, confirm, strengthen, and establish you;” the sentence being thus composed of four members, instead of three, as in our version. But the Alexandrian and Vatican manuscripts, as also the Syriac version support the Vulgate reading. The words are nearly synonymous; and the idea derived from the material building is applied to the spiritual edifice of virtue and grace, which the Apostle here prays that God would perfect in them, unto the unchangeable state of glory.

1Pe 5:11 To him be glory and empire, for ever and ever. Amen.

To him is due all glory for his gifts, and all power over creatures, for ever and ever. Amen.

“To him be glory and empire,” that is, all the glory of his gifts, and power over all his creatures, for ever and ever. Amen.

1Pe 5:12 By Sylvanus, a faithful brother unto you, as I think, I have written briefly: beseeching and testifying that this is the true grace of God, wherein you stand.

Sylvanus, a faithful brother, I have made the bearer of this Epistle, which I have written to you, I should think briefly, considering the interest and pleasure its perusal will afford you, imploring and exhorting you to perseverance, and bearing witness, that the grace of faith, in which you still have faithfully persevered, is the true grace of God leading to eternal life.

“By Sylvanus;” this is, most probably, Silas, the companion of St. Paul in preaching the gospel.—(Acts, 15:40). “A faithful brother unto you, as I think I have written briefly.” “Unto you,” according to the Greek, ὑμιν τον πιστον ἀδελφον, is joined with “faithful,” and means, who discharges a faithful ministry for you; but according to the Latin and Syriac copies, it is connected with “I have written.” Silas was the bearer of the Epistle from Rome to the East. “As I think,” i.e., faithful to you, as I think; or more probably, I have written to you this Epistle, I think, briefly, considering the matter so interesting to you, and your affectionate regard for myself. The Epistles of those we love are always considered brief, and never tiresome. “Beseeching;” the Greek word, παρακαλῶν, means also, exhorting you to perseverance in the faith, wherein you hold out, notwithstanding the pressure of persecution: and “testifying that this is the true grace of God.” As Apostle of God, I bear witness that the faith you received from us, and in which you still “stand,” is the true grace of God, which leads to eternal life.

1Pe 5:13 The church that is in Babylon, elected together with you, saluteth you. And so doth my son, Mark.

The assemblage of the faithful at Rome, elected to the same grace with you, salute you, and wish you the abundance of all temporal and spiritual blessings, and so does my son, Mark, whom I have spiritually begotten, or who serves me as a son.

“The Church that is in Babylon,” or the assemblage of the faithful, “elected together with you,” called to the same faith and hope in eternal glory, “saluteth you,” or wish you all blessings both temporal and spiritual. “In Babylon.” Meaning the City of Rome.—(Vide Introduction).

“And so doth my son, Mark.” He refers to St. Mark, the Evangelist, whom he afterwards sent to found the Church of Alexandria, A.D. 45. “My son;” either because he was spiritually begotten by him, and fully instructed in the faith (Baronius Annal. Anno Christi, 45); or because he served him in the work of the Gospel with the fidelity and affection of a son, as St. Paul says of Timothy (Philippians 2).

1Pe 5:14 Salute one another with a holy kiss. Grace be to all you who are in Christ Jesus. Amen.

Salute one another with a holy and chaste kiss. Grace and peace be to you all, who are incorporated with Christ Jesus, by your Christian profession.—Amen.

“With a holy kiss,” that is a chaste embrace. “Grace be to you all.” In Greek, ειρηνη, “peace be to you all.” There is scarcely any difference in sense. The Hebrews, by wishing a person peace, wished him all spiritual and temporal blessings, which we mean by “grace.” “Who are in Christ Jesus,” that is, Christians incorporated with him, and forming the body, of which he is the mystic head.

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Commentaries for the Fifth Sunday of Easter, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 16, 2016

Note: This post needs some editing and updating of links.

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR C

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Scroll down. Used in most English speaking countries. For some reason the site has the Gospel reading before the second reading.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 14:21-27.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 14:21-27. On verses 19-28.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Acts 14:21-27. On verses 19-28.

My Notes On Acts 14:21-27.

Pending: Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 14:21-27.

Word Sunday Notes on Acts 14:21-27.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 14:21-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 14:21-27.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 145:8-9, 10-11, 12-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145. Very brief.

St Augustine’s Exposition Of Psalm 145. Whole psalm.

Part 1. Pope Benedict On Psalm 145 .  Whole psalm.

Part 2. Pope Benedict on Psalm 145.  Whole psalm.

Word Sunday Notes on Psalm 145. Whole psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 21:1-5a.

My Notes On Revelation 21:1-5a.

Word Sunday on Revelation 21:1-5a.

Speaking of Scripture Blog. An excerpt from Dr. Peter Williamson’s forthcoming commentary on Revelation, part of the Catholic Commentary on Sacred  Scripture series (see here).

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 21:1-5.

Homilist’s Catechism on Revelation 21:1-5a.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: John 13:31-33a, 34-35.

St John Chrysostom Homiletic Commentaries 72 & 73 On John. A modern translation covering John 13:20-14:7.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 13:31-33a, 34-35.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 13:31-33a, 34-35.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 13:31-33a, 34-35.

My Notes on John 13:31-35.

Word Sunday Notes on John 13:31-35.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 13:31-33a, 34-35.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 13:31-35.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Sites which offer commentaries, reflections, summaries,etc., on one or more of the readings in a single post.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines.  Gives the theme(s) of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

Scripture Speaks. Since the site doesn’t post every week I’ve linked to the archive.

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: The Kingdom of Love: Reflection on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

Glancing Thoughts: Brief reflection on the gospel reading from philosopher Eleanore Stump.

The Gospel in its Historical Cultural Context. Briefly examines the gospel reading in light of first century Mediterranean culture.

Thoughts From The Early Church. Excerpt on the Gospel from St Cyril of Alexandria.

Scripture In Depth. Succinct summary of the readings and their relation to one another.

PODCASTS: Bible Studies and Homilies. Partially complete.

On The Readings As A Whole:

Franciscan Bible Study Podcast. Link is to archive page. This Sunday’s study will become available on Thursday.

St Martha’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings in some detail.

Update: Video: The New Commandment and the New Creation. By Catholic biblical scholar Dr. Brant Pitre.

On Acts of Apostles:

EWTN’s Gospel of the Holy Spirit (on Acts of Apostles). Listen to episode 7.

St Catherine of Siena’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostle. Video on chapters 13-15.

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostles. Listen to part 8 on chapters 10-15.

ON THE BOOK OF REVELATION:

Institute of Catholic Culture on Revelation. A three part introductory overview of the book.

St Martha’s Podcast Study of Revelation. On chapters 20-22.

A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. Video on chapters 13-16.

ON THE GOSPEL OF JOHN:

EWTN’s Study of John’s Gospel. Listen to episode 10.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John’s Gospel. On chapters 13-14. Click on the POD icon or the direct download link.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast on John’s Gospel. Scroll down and click on the episode covering 13:10-14:31.

HOMILIES: Pending.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 9:1-20

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 10, 2016

AN ANALYSIS OF ACTS CHAPTER 9

The Chapter commences with the wonderful and miraculous conversion of Saul on his way to persecute the Christians of Damascus, which was perfected by the instructions of Ananias, whose fears occasioned by the persecuting character of Saul were dissipated by Divine assurances on the subject (1–18). The zeal of Saul in preaching the Gospel, the conspiracy on the part of the Jews to kill him (19–25), His escape (25). The distrust of the faithful of Jerusalem regarding him on account of his repute, as Persecutor, quieted by the intervention of Barnabas, who introduced him to the Apostles (26, 27). The machinations of the Gentiles to kill him. Hence his escape to Tharsus (29, 30). The miracles wrought by Peter in the restoration to health of Eneas (32–35). The wonderful miracle wrought by him in raising Tabitha or Dorcas from the dead, which caused the conversion of many (36–43).

Act 9:1 And Saul, as yet breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the disciples of the Lord, went to the high priest

“And Saul,” who had already rendered himself prominently conspicuous in the persecution of the Christians, was now “as yet,” in the interval between the present time and the death of Stephen, indulging still, his passion for persecution, shown in the murder of Stephen.

“Breathing out.” Furiously agitated, displaying a violent thirst for vengeance. “Threatenings,” all kinds of threatening and denunciatory language. “And slaughter,” designs of wholesale murder “against the disciples of our Lord,” the converted believers. He had a hand in putting to death a great number of Christians (Acts 26:10, 11).

“Went to the High Priest,”

Act 9:2 And asked of him letters to Damascus, to the synagogues: that if he found any men and women of this way, he might bring them bound to Jerusalem.

“And asked of him letters,” &c. The letters were written by the authority of the Sanhedrim and signed by the High Priest, as president of the Council. Some say the conversion of St. Paul took place in the thirty-fifth year of our era, three years after our Lord’s death. In that case the High Priest was Caiphas, who was deposed by Tertullus.

If it occurred later, the High Priest was Theophilus. To the Sanhedrim, belonged to take cognizance of offences against religion. The Romans connived at their doing this beyond the precincts of Judea, wherever synagogues were found, dependent on the Sanhedrim.

“Asked.” He himself volunteered to act as persecutor; “Letters,” credentials conveying a commission or authorization. “To Damascus” a celebrated well-known city of Asia, mentioned in Scripture city, in the days of Abraham (Genisis 15:2). After various vicissitudes, it was ultimately taken by Selim, A. D. 1517. Ever since, it has been subject to the Saracens.

It was well-known to Saul, that a large number of Christians had been at Damascus, and the credential letters gave him the power vested in the Sanhedrim to punish all offences against religion. The policy of the Romans was to leave the exercise of such power to the Sanhedrim, reserving for themselves the confirmation of the sentence of death.

“To the Synagogues.” Over whom the Sanhedrim exercised authority.

“Men and women,” even “women,” were not spared, which shows intense hatred.

“Of this way,” of thinking and believing; of this sect.

“Bring them bound,” for trial before the Sanhedrim, whose powers in matters pertaining to religion, the Romans sanctioned or connived at, save in the supreme case of death, specially reserved for themselves.

Act 9:3 And as he went on his journey, it came to pass that he drew nigh to Damascus. And suddenly a light from heaven shined round about him.

“While travelling along the road, and when he was near Damascus—how near, no one can tell—the important event here mentioned, took place.

“Suddenly.” With the suddenness of a flash of lightning. It was not, however, a flash of lightning. It was the transcendent, overwhelming, dazzling glory, surrounding our Lord Himself, as at his Transfiguration (John 17:5). It was our Lord Himself, personally appearing to St. Paul in His glory, which Paul recognized, calling Him “Lord” (v. 5). For Barnabas declared “how he had seen the Lord in the way (v. 27). He himself says (1 Cor. 9:1, 15:8), that he saw our Lord. Similar is the language (1 Cor. 9:1). He now sees resuscitated, living, glorious, our Lord, whom he supposed to be dead.

“A light from heaven,” from the sky, “above the brightness of the sun (26:13).

“About him,” and his companions also (26:13).

Act 9:4 And falling on the ground, he heard a voice saying to him: Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?

Overpowered by the dazzling light, he fell to the ground, and so did those who were with him, overawed by the majesty of what they saw (26:14). It is not opposed to this, that “they stood amazed” (v. 7), for they might have soon risen to their feet.

“He heard a voice, Saul, Saul.” The word is repeated for emphasis sake.

“Why,”—for what reason, on account of what provocation? “persecutest thou me,” viz., in his chosen members. He was head of the body whose members Saul was engaged in furiously and relentlessly persecuting.

Act 9:5 Who said: Who art thou, Lord? And he: I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. It is hard for thee to kick against the goad.

“Lord” does not imply Divinity. It is only a term of courteous reverence elicited by the terror he was in. Up to this, Saul did not for certain acknowledge Jesus Christ to be God. Similar is the meaning of Magdalen’s words, when she thought she was addressing the gardener (John 20:15).

“I am Jesus,” &c. In chap. 22:8, it is “I am Jesus of Nazareth,” in which is conveyed that the humble Nazarene, whom Paul despised, as if nothing good could come out of Nazareth, is now Lord of all. He now appears to him in glory.

“It is hard for thee to kick,” &c. A proverbial expression with the Greeks and Romans, conveying that obstinate and stubborn resistance to lawful authority and rebellion against those who have a right to command is injurious to the man who resists. The idea is borrowed from stubborn oxen kicking against the “goad,” or sharp piece of iron used to urge them on. By kicking, they injure themselves. This according to the conjecture of some, denotes the resistance Paul had been giving before our Lord appeared to him, to the interior emotions of grace urging him to desist from the persecution he was practising. The example and admonition of his former teacher, Gamaliel (22:3) who embraced the faith, may have served to disquiet him and cause some remorse of conscience.

Act 9:6 And he, trembling and astonished, said: Lord, what wilt thou have me to do?

What he saw and heard created a feeling of terror and alarm on reflecting on the wicked course he had been pursuing.

“Lord.” The term here denotes the supreme reverence due to Him as God and Saviour. “What wilt thou,” &c., shows his thorough conversion and prompt change of heart. Giving up his own wicked will and feeling of opposition to God, he now professes at once his willingness to embrace in all things God’s Adorable Will.

Act 9:7 And the Lord said to him: Arise and go into the city; and there it shall be told thee what thou must do. Now the men who went in company with him stood amazed, hearing indeed a voice but seeing no man.

“The Lord”—our God and Saviour—“arise.” He was still prostrate (v. 8, 26:16).

“Go into the city”—Damascus close by (v. 3). The whole narrative is more circumstantially detailed by St. Paul himself (c. 26:16–18) in his address to King Agrippa.

“And there it shall be told thee,” &c. In this we see the wonderful and mysterious ways of God’s Providence in carrying out his designs. He might himself have instructed him on the spot. But, no; it pleased Him to employ the ministry of an humble disciple at Damascus for perfecting His beneficent designs. In this He had also in view to test Paul’s humility, obedience and self abnegation.

“The men.… stood amazed.” The Greek word for amazed (εννεοι) means struck dumb, unable to speak. They were struck mute with terror. It may be, when the first feeling of alarm which prostrated them (26:14) subsided, they stood up immediately, while Paul, who was chiefly concerned in the matter, continued prostrate. In c. 26:14, it is said they were “all fallen on the ground.” This occurred, as the immediate effect of the light, before they heard the voice. Here we have an account of what took place after the first feeling of panic and alarm was over. They stood up immediately. It may be, the word, “stood,” has no particular meaning; that it merely denotes the feeling of alarm they felt, without reference to what position they were in, whether standing or prostrate.

“Hearing, indeed, a voice,” probably means hearing a sound, but not understanding the articulate utterance and meaning as it was understood by Saul.

Act 9:8 And Saul arose from the ground: and when his eyes were opened, he saw nothing. But they, leading him by the hands, brought him to Damascus.

“And when his eyes were opened.” The Greek would be more properly rendered, and although his eyes opened, “or with eyes opened.” For while prostrate, his eyes were opened, looking at our Lord in His glorious appearance. But, when he rose up, on account of the dazzling, intense brightness of the light emanating from the glorified body of Jesus, his eyes though opened, were bereft of the faculty of seeing “for three days,” v. 9.

Act 9:9 And he was there three days without sight: and he did neither eat nor drink.

“And he did neither eat,” &c. Terror and remorse, suspense and perplexity, as he received no intimation as to what he was to do, joined with fervent and absorbing prayer for pardon of his sins, for heavenly light to remove his state of perplexity, made him indifferent and unconcerned about all corporal sustenance.

Act 9:10 Now there was a certain disciple at Damascus, named Ananias. And the Lord said to him in a vision: Ananias, And he said: Behold I am here, Lord.

“A certain disciple,” a Christian, who had already heard of Saul’s violent persecution of his fellow-believers (v. 13). “Ananias,” the term would indicate a Jew by birth converted to the faith.

Act 9:11 And the Lord said to him: Arise and go into the street that is called Strait and seek in the house of Judas, one named Saul of Tarsus. For behold he prayeth.

“For he prayeth.” Fear him no longer, as a fanatical persecutor of the Christians. He is now a different man, completely changed, engaged in fervent prayer for light, guidance and forgiveness. This would point to the manner Paul spent the three days in question.

Act 9:12 (And he saw a man named Ananias coming in and putting his hands upon him, that he might receive his sight.)

Very likely, the words of this verse are parenthetical, inserted by St. Luke, to inform us that while our Lord was addressing Ananias in a vision, Saul was favoured with another vision, assuring him that Ananias, whose name he gives, was no impostor, and would soon show him, on the part of God, what he was to do. “Quid Te oporteat facere” (v. 7).

Act 9:13 But Ananias answered: Lord, I have heard by many of this man, how much evil he hath done to thy saints in Jerusalem.

In this Ananias expresses his fears and surprise. Probably, Ananias, informed by letters from the faithful of Jerusalem, or by public rumour, or by some Christians who fled on account of the persecution from Jerusalem to Damascus, heard all about Paul’s fanaticism and persecuting violence.

“Thy saints.” The term always applied by the Apostle, in his Epistles, to Christians.

Act 9:14 And here he hath authority from the chief priests to bind all that invoke thy name.

“And here” in this very city. Likely, the companions of Saul published all about him, and so it reached Ananias.

Act 9:15 And the Lord said to him: Go thy way: for this man is to me a vessel of election, to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel.

“Go thy way.” A brief form of expressing that God will do what is just and reasonable. Here, it is a repetition of God’s instructions to Ananias regarding Saul.

“A vessel of Election.” “Vessel,” according to Hebrew usage, signifies an organ or instrument. “Election,” chosen, like the other Apostles, to carry out My designs of mercy. “Carry My name.” Proclaim My attributes as God and Man, Creator and Redeemer of mankind.

“Before the Gentiles.” The different nations of the earth. Paul was in a special manner constituted the Apostle of the Gentiles (Rom. 11:13, 15:16; Gal. 2:8).

“And kings.” This he did (Acts 25:23, 26:1).

“And children of Israel.” This he did at once (20, 21).

Act 9:16 For I will shew him how great things he must suffer for my name’s sake.

“I will shew him,” &c. As a proof that he will be a distinguished instrument to be employed by Me, I will have him suffer much on My account, and hence he will be distinguished in My service. His success will be proportioned to his fortitude and constancy in enduring evils. That he did suffer this is shown from the picture he draws for us (2 Cor. 11) and his subsequent History in these Acts of the Apostles.

Act 9:17 And Ananias went his way and entered into the house. And laying his hands upon him, he said: Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus hath sent me, he that appeared to thee in the way as thou camest, that thou mayest receive thy sight and be filled with the Holy Ghost.

In obedience to our Lord’s command, Ananias, proceeded to his destination, “and laying his hands upon him.” It was not for the purpose of giving the Sacrament of Confirmation. There is no evidence that Ananias was in a position to do so—moreover, Saul was still unbaptized, and Ananias himself states the object: “that thou mayst receive thy sight,” which he did on the spot, “and be filled with the Holy Ghost,” through the baptism, he was immediately to receive. The imposition of hands restored his sight. Baptism gave him the Holy Ghost.” It may be, that with the effect of baptism, Paul received in an extraordinary way the grace of Confirmation without the eternal rite, as did the Apostles on Pentecost Sunday.

Act 9:18 And immediately there fell from his eyes as it were scales: and he received his sight. And rising up, he was baptized.

The teguments that fell from his eyes and impeded his sight were like “scales.” They fell, as if “scales” had fallen, with which fishes and serpents are covered. The cure being so sudden, and, so far as human agency was concerned, without any human adequate cause, shows that it was manifestly miraculous.

“He was baptized.” As there is no mention of having received the necessary previous instruction in the truths of faith, it is most likely our Lord Himself fully instructed him during the three days preceding his baptism. Hence, he says (Gal. 1) he received the Gospel, not from man, but from Jesus Christ.

Act 9:19 And when he had taken meat, he was strengthened. And he was with the disciples that were at Damascus, for some days.

He recovered his natural strength, weakened by previous fasting.

After his communion he proceeded to Arabia, and then again came back to Damascus. St. Luke makes no mention of his journey to Arabia.

Act 9:20 And immediately he preached Jesus in the synagogues, that he is the son of God.

This shows the genuine sincerity of his conversion.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Notes on Acts of Apostles, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 10, 2016

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Scroll down. Used in most English speaking countries. For some reason the site has the Gospel reading before the second reading.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 13:14, 43-52.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 13:14, 43-52.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Acts 13:14, 43-52. Actually on 13:42-14:6.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 13:14, 43-56. Actually on verses 12-14, 42-53.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 13:14, 43-52.

Word Sunday’s Notes on Acts 13:14, 43-52.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 13:14, 43-52.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Psalm 100:1-2, 3, 5.

Pending: Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 100. Whole psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 100. Whole psalm.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100. Whole psalm.

St Augustine’s Exposition Of Psalm 100. Whole psalm.

Word Sunday’s Notes on Psalm 100. Whole psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 7:9, 14b-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 7:9, 14b-17.

Word Sunday’s Notes on Revelation 7:9, 14b-17.

Homilist’s Catechism on Revelation 7:9, 14b-17.

Update: Speaking of Scripture Blog. Excerpt from Dr. Peter Willaimson’s forthcoming commentary on Revelation, part of the Catholic Commentary On Sacred Scripture series.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 10:27-30.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s  Commentary on John 10:27-30. On 18-39.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 10:27-30. On 22-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 10:27-30.

Lecture on John 10:27-30 by St Thomas Aquinas. On verses 19-30. Should not be confused with the Catena Aurea.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 10:27-30.

Word Sunday’s Notes on John 10:27-30.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 10:27-30.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Sites which offer commentaries, reflections, summaries,etc., on one or more of the readings in a single post.

Doctrinal Homily Outline.  Gives the theme(s) of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

Scripture Speaks. Since the site doesn’t post every week I’ve linked to the archive.

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

 Sacred Page Blog: Both “Lamb” and “Shepherd”. Reflection on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

Glancing Thoughts: Brief reflection on the first reading from philosopher Eleanore Stump.

The Gospel in its Historical Cultural Context. Briefly highlights the significance of Jesus’ relationship to the Father in terms of first century Mediterranean culture.

Thoughts From The Early Church. Excerpt on the Gospel from St Cyril of Alexandria.

Scripture In Depth. Succinct summary of the readings and their relation to one another.

CHILDREN AND TEEN RESOURCES:

Catholic Mom.  Scroll down to this Sunday. Resources appear oriented towards 7-14 years of age.

Word Sunday’s Children’s Reading. Two very short stories seeking to draw a lesson from the first and Gospel readings.

We Believe. Activities geared towards Kindergarten through 8th grade. Also has resources for catechists, clergy, etc.

Domestic Church. Lent and Easter activities arranged for families, younger children, older children.

Sunday Connection. Resources for different grade levels, and family activities.

Catholic Kids Bulletin.

PODCASTS: Bible studies and homilies.

On the Readings as a Whole: On the three readings and the Psalm.

St Martha’s Bible Study Podcast for the 4th Sunday of Easter.
Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast for the 4th Sunday of Easter. Link is to archive page. Episode will be available sometime Thursday.
Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Very brief overview highlighting the main theme(s) of the readings.
Update: Jesus the Good Shepherd. By Catholic biblical scholar Dr. Brant Pitre.

Father Francis Martin’s Reflections: 4 parts, each approximately 15 minutes. The first is introductory and the remaining three look at the readings.

Part 1. Introduction.
Part 2.  First reading and psalm.
Part 3. Second reading.
Part4. Gospel.

Acts of Apostles Chapter 7:

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast on Acts of Apostles. Listen to part 6 which deals with chapters 6-9.
EWTN’s Gospel of the Holy Spirit (on Acts of Apostles). Listen to episode 4.
St Catherine of Siena’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostles. On chapters 6-8.

Revelation Chapter 7:

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast Study of Revelation. Three part study provides background and overview to the book.
(1) St Martha’s Parish Podcast Study of Revelation Chapters 6 & 7. Please note that the study opens with a brief reading from Mark 13. Power-point handout for above talk.
(2) Another Study on Revelation by St Martha’s Parish.  On chapters 7-11.
Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On chapters 7-12.

Gospel of John 10:

EWTN’s Series on John 10-11. Scroll down and listen to episode 9.
St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on John. Click on POD icon or direct download link.
Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast on John. Scroll down and click on the episode deal with 10:14-12:6.

HOMILIES:

Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily.

Posted in Catholic, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Christ | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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