The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Commentaries on the Sunday and Daily Readings (Trinity Sunday to the End of the Year)

Posted by Dim Bulb on June 10, 2017

ORDINARY TIME
YEAR I
SUNDAY CYCLE A

June 4. Commentaries for the Ninth Week in Ordinary Time (Pentecost Through Holy Trinity).
June 11. Commentaries for the Tenth Week of Ordinary Time.
June 18. Commentaries for he Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time.
June 25. Commentaries for the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time.
July 2. Commentaries for the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
July 9. Commentaries for the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
July 16: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
July 23. Commentaries for the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
July 30. Commentaries for the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time.
Aug. 6. Commentaries for the Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
Aug. 13. Commentaries for the Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time.
Aug. 20. Commentaries for the Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time.
Aug. 27. Commentaries for the Twenty-First Week in Ordinary Time.
Sept. 3. Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Week in Ordinary Time.
Sept. 10. Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Week in Ordinary Time.
Sept. 17. Commentaries for the Twenty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time.
Sept. 24. Commentaries for the Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time.
Oct. 1. Commentaries for the Twenty-Sixth Week in Ordinary Time.
Oct. 8. Commentaries for the Twenty-Seventh Week in Ordinary Time.
Oct. 15. Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Week in Ordinary Time.
Oct. 22. Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Week in Ordinary Time.
Oct. 29. Commentaries for the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time.
Nov. 5. Commentaries for the Thirty-First Week in Ordinary Time.
Nov 12. Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Week in Ordinary Time.
Nov. 19. Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Week in Ordinary Time.
Nov 26. Thirty-Fourth and Final Week in Ordinary Time.

 

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 7, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 7
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 5:14-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 5:14-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 149.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Lecture on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on John 2:1.

Father MacRory’s Commentary on John 2:1-11.

My Notes on John 2:1-11. On 1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 2:1-11.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 6, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 6
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings. Note: There are 2 gospel readings to chose from today. I’ve only posted on the first alternate (Mk 1:7-11).

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Jn 5:5-13.

St Augustine on 1 Jn 5:5-13. Only on verses 7 & 8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Jn 5:5-13.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 147 in Two Parts:

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 147.

1 Alt. Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 1:7-11.

1 Alt. Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:7-11.

1 Alt . Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:7-11.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 5, Memorial of St John Neumann, Bishop

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 5
MEMORIAL OF ST JOHN NEUMANN BISHOP

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:11-21.

St Augustine on 1 John 3:11-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:11-21.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 100.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:43-51.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:43-51.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:43-51. Scroll down to lecture 16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:43-51.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 4, Memorial of Elizabeth Ann Seton

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 4
MEMORIAL OF ST ELIZABETH ANN SETON, RELIGIOUS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

St Augustine on 1 John 3:7-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:35-42.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:35-42. Scroll down and read lecture 15.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:35-42.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on John 1:35-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:35-42.

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Commentaries for the Mass Readings for January 3, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 3
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

St Augustine’s Homily on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Father MacIntyre’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:29-34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:29-34. Scroll down and read lecture 14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:29-34.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on Today’s Gospel (John 1:29-34).

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 2

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 2
MEMORIAL OF SAINT BASIL THE GREAT AND SAINT GREGORY NANZIANZEN, BISHOPS AND DOCTORS OF THE CHURCH

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Father MacIntryre’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:19-28.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 1:19-28. Scroll down and read lectures 12 & 13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:19-28.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on John 1:19-28. Prayer and reflection on the Gospel in the Carmelite tradition.

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Commentaries for the Feast of the Holy Family (Sunday in the Octave of Christmas)

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

READINGS: alternate readings are allowed for the 1st and 2nd readings and the responsorial. Shorter forms of the second and gospel readings are also allowed.

NABRE. Used in the USA.

New Jerusalem Bible. Used in most English speaking countries.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Sirach 3:2-6, 12-14, or Gen 15:1-6, 21:1-3.

Word-Sunday Notes on Sirach 3:2-6, 12-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 3:2-6, 12-14.

Alternate First Reading. Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 15:1-6, 21:1-3.

COMMENTARIES OF THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 128:1-2, 3, 4-5, or Ps 105:1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 8-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 128.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 128.

Alternate Responsorial: Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

Alternate Responsorial: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Alternate Responsorial: St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 105.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Colossians 3:12-21. Shorter reading 3:12-17. Alternate reading Hebrews 11:8, 11-12, 17-18.

Bernardin de Piconio on Colossians 3:12-21. Shorter reading 12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-21. Shorter reading 12-17

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 3:12-21. Shorter reading 12-17

Shorter reading: Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Shorter reading: Word-Sunday Notes on Colossians 3:12-17.

Alternate Second Reading: Father Callan’s Commentary on Heb 11:8, 11-12, 17-18. On 8-19.

Alternate Second Reading: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 11:8, 11-12, 17-18. On 8-18.

Alternate Second Reading: Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 11:8, 11-12, 17-18.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 2:22-40, or Lk 2:22, 39-40.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Luke 2:22-40.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:22-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:22-40.

 

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Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 11:8-19

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

Introduction to Hebrews Chapter 11.

Heb 11:1-38. The close of the preceding Chapter has shown that faith is essential to salvation, and hence the author will now describe so important a virtue and illustrate its value and power by citing some of the religious heroes of the past. These examples of what faith has done for so many of those ancient saints whom Jewish history most revered will be especially consoling to the readers of this Epistle, for it will show them that their own Christian faith is not something new and distinct from the religious assurance and conviction which sustained their ancestors, but rather a continuation of the same sustaining virtue, only on a much more elevated plain.

11:8.  By faith he that is called Abraham, obeyed to go out into a place which he was to receive for an inheritance; and he went out, not knowing whither he went.

8. As Abraham was the supreme example of faith among the Jews, the writer now dwells at length on his faith. The great patriarch’s faith is illustrated: (a) by his obedience to the call of God to go forth from his own country in search of the Promised Land and his wanderings in that strange land (ver. 8-10); (b) by the confidence with which he and his wife Sara received God’s promise of offspring (ver. 11-12); (c) by his willingness to sacrifice Isaac (ver. 17-19).

The call of God came to Abraham in Ur of the Chaldees, and in obedience to it he left home and kindred, wandering and enduring privations and hardships in search of the land of Canaan which God had promised to give to him and his descendants (Gen 12:1ff.).

He that is called Abraham. Here the author alludes to the fact that God, as a mark of special favor, changed the patriarch’s original name Abram to Abraham (Gen17:5).

11:9. By faith he abode in the land as a stranger, dwelling in cottages, with Isaac and Jacob, the co-heirs of the same promise.

9. Faith not only made Abraham obedient to the call of God, but also gave him patience to wait for the fulfillment of God’s promises, dwelling as a sojourner in a foreign country. His son, Isaac, and his grandson, Jacob, persevered in the same faith, never doubting the promise of God. Cf. Gen 12:8, 13:3, 17:1 ff.

11:10. For he looked for a city that hath foundations; whose builder and maker is God.

10. Abraham was sustained in his faith by the conviction that there was an abiding city awaiting him hereafter in heaven, a city whose architect and master-builder is God. The land of Canaan which God had promised him was but a figure of an eternal inheritance which God would bestow upon him above.

A city that hath foundations means the heavenly Jerusalem (12:22; Gal 4:26; Apoc. 21:2).

11: 11. By faith also Sara herself, being barren, received strength to conceive seed, even past the time of age ; because she believed that he was faithful who had promised.
11:12. For which cause there sprung even from one (and him as good as dead) issue like the stars of heaven in multitude, and like the sand which is by the seashore innumerable
.

11-12. Though Sara was already ninety years of age when she received the promise of a son, she believed, even if somewhat less promptly than Abraham, and as a result she was given the power to conceive (Gen 17:17). Likewise, though far beyond the age of begetting children, Abraham, as a reward of his faith, became the father of a posterity as numerous as the stars of heaven and the sands on the sea-shore (Gen 21:17; cf, Rom 4:19).

11:13. All these died according to faith, not having received the promises, but beholding them afar off, and saluting them and confessing that they are pilgrims and strangers on the earth.
11:14. For they that say these things do signify that they seek a country.
11:15. And truly if they had been mindful of that from whence they came out, they had doubtless time to return.
11:16. But now they desire a better, that is to say, a heavenly country. There- fore God is not ashamed to be called their God; for he hath prepared for them a city
.

13-16, In these verses the author interrupts his argument to reflect on the great faith of the patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The vision which faith had disclosed to them was too glorious to find its realization during their lifetime, or on earth.

The fulfillment of the divine promises they saw dimly in the far future; but they were not disappointed, for they sought a city not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Therefore, God recognized their faith and bestowed on them a celestial home. If the “country” they sought had been the earthly one whence they had come, they could have returned to it; but the object of their quest was “a heavenly country.”

11:17. By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered Isaac, and he that had
received the promises offered up his only-begotten son,
11:18. To whom it was said: In Isaac shall thy seed be called:
11:19. Accounting that God is able to raise up even from the dead. Whereupon also he received him for a parable
.

17-19. The faith of Abraham was sorely tried when God demanded of him the sacrifice of his son Isaac, but the aged patriarch did not waver (Gen 22:1-18). Isaac was indeed the son of promise, who had been born of a freewoman, and on whom the future depended; but at God’s command Abraham made ready to immolate him, feeling sure that He who had given this son in the first instance by a miracle, could restore him if necessary by a second miracle.

Isaac is called “the only-begotten son,” because to him alone were the promises made, Ishmael being excluded from them.

Whereupon also he received him for a parable, i.e., as a reward of his faith Abraham received his son safely back from the jaws of death, and this delivery made Isaac a “parable,” i.e., a figure or type of the sacrifice and resurrection of Christ.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 11:8-18

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

ANALYSIS OF HEBREWS CHAPTER 11

The Hebrews, it would appear, were not sufficiently impressed with the importance and necessity of faith; and were, therefore, in danger of losing it by apostasy. They were taught to look upon it as a mode of justifying wholly unknown to the saints of the Old Testament; and to these false notions, with which they were imbued, inight be traced their fatal facility, in deserting it under the pressure of persecution. The Apostle (10:38) takes occasion from the words of the Prophet Habacuc, to confute this pernicious error. Before making the application of it, in this chapter, to the sainted heroes of old, he first gives a description offaith, describing it by two of its qualities best accommodated to the circumstances of those, whom he addresses (verse 1).

In the next place, applying this faith to the saints of old, he shows that it was owing to if, the most distinguished among them obtained justification (2-39).

He, finally shows the great advantage which we, in the New Law, possess over the ancients. We can, at once, enter on the possession of the promised blessings, while they were obliged to wait for our time to enjoy them in common with us; and, surely, we should display no less heroism in the cause of faith, of which the blessings and promise are present, than they did, for whom the fulfilment of the promise was distant.

Heb 11:8  By faith he that is called Abraham obeyed to go out into a place which he was to receive for an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing whither he went.

“He that is called.” The Greek copy, followed by the Vulgate, had, ὅ  καλουμενος. This is also the reading of the Alexandrian Manuscript. In this reading, allusion is made to the change of name in Abraham (Genesis, xvii. 3). The article (ὅ) is omitted in the ordinary Greek copies, and the words are rendered, Abraham, when called, obeyed to go, &c., in which rendering the participle “called,” which in the Greek, is the present tense, receives a past signification. Our reading is, however, the better sustained.

Heb 11:9  By faith he abode in the land of promise, as in a strange country, dwelling in cottages, with Isaac and Jacob, the co-heirs of the same promise.

He dwell as a pilgrim in the land of promise where he did not occupy a foot of  ground, as his fixed habitation, “with Isaac and Jacob:” “with” has the meaning of as well as, it denotes parity of circumstances, Though it might be said that he dwelt in tents with Isaac and Jacob; for, Jacob was fifteen years old at Abraham’s death,the former meaning, viz. : they, as well as Abraham, dwelt successively in tents; is the more probable.

Heb 11:10  For he looked for a city that hath foundations: whose builder and maker is God.

“For, he looked for a city,” &c. In this verse, the Apostle proves that it was owing to faith that Abraham dwelt as a stranger in moveable tents in the land of promise, because he locked forward to the heavenly city of eternal stability, firmly fixed and founded by God himself. What an idea of the condition of man here below is conveyed to us, in the faith of the Patriarch!—like him, we are here but strangers in this foreign land; heaven is our true home, our eternal dwelling-place, on which our thoughts and affections should be fixed. Our conversation should be in heaven, whither we are tending.

Heb 11:11  By faith also Sara herself, being barren, received strength to conceive seed, even past the time of age: because she believed that he was faithful who had promised.

“Being barren.” These words are omitted in the ordinary Greek copies, but they are found in the Alexandrian and other Manuscripts.

Objection.—Was not Sara rebuked by the angel for laughing from incredulity?—(Genesis, xxiii. 15).

Answer.—Although Sara smiled at first, still, on discovering the dignity of him who made the promise, she believed. Some, among whom is Estius, by “faith” understand the faith of Abraham himself, which the Apostle would appear to be specially commending, and in consideration of which, Sara conceived; in the same way, the walls of Jericho are said to have fallen by faith, i.e., the faith of the Jews, and the following verse in some measure favours this opinion. However, the following words, “She believed,” are in favour of the other interpretation. “To conceive seed;” to which the Greek adds, and brought forth.

Heb 11:12  For which cause there sprung even from one (and him as good as dead) as the stars of heaven in multitude and as the sand which is by the sea shore innumerable.

“As the stars… as the sand,” &c. These are hyperboles easily understood, signifying a very numerous progeny. They may refer to carnal Israel, in the first place, and to spiritual Israel, or to all Christians, in the second.

Heb 11:13  All these died according to faith, not having received the promises but beholding them afar off and saluting them and confessing that they are pilgrims and strangers on the earth.

“All these,” i.e., the three last mentioned Patriarchs, to whom were made the promises, “died according to faith,” i.e., persevered till death in faith, believing in God’s promises, although they did not receive the promises, nor did they enjoy them immediately themselves. This is true, whether the promises be referred to the occupation of Chanaan by their innumerable offspring, or to heaven, which was closed until after the ascension of Christ; they contessed themse.ves, on aii occasions, to be foreigners and sojourners on earth; “but beholding them from afar, and saluting them,” like sailors, who, after a dangerous and distant voyage, on descrying land for the first time, joyously salute it. After the words, “beholding them afar off,” are added in some Greek copies, being persuaded of them. But, this addition is generally rejected by critics, as unsupported by the authority of the chief Manuscripts. The Apostle refers to the promises, which the Patriarchs themselves did not obtain during life, in order to show the firmness of their faith, and thus to animate the Hebrews, of his own day, to perseverance under affliction, although the promised goods of heaven in store for them, were distant and invisible; for, tiiey had been stih more so, for the Patriarchs.

Heb 11:14  For they that say these things do signify that they seek a country.

Having observed in the preceding verse, that the Patriarchs died without obtaining the promises, the Apostle shows what the promises regarded, at least, so far as they themselves were to enjoy them; surely, not the possession by them or the land of Chanaan; for, by saying they saluted them from afar, there could not be question of the place where they actually dwelt. Moreover, by calling themselves pilgrims, they showed that they were in search of some permanent country, and Cnanaan was not their country.

Heb 11:15  And truly, if they had been mindful of that from whence they came out, they had doubtless, time to return.

Nor was there question of Chaldea; for, if so, they might have returned, as it was not more than fifty leagues distant from Chanaan.

Heb 11:16  But now they desire a better, that is to say, a heavenly country. Therefore, God is not ashamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city.

Then, it follows, they were in search of a better, that is to say, their heavenly country; hence it is, that God, though God of all mankind, calls hiuiseit their God in particular, as if rendering them equal value with the rest of creation.

Heb 11:17  By faith Abraham, when he was tried, offered Isaac: and he that had received the promises offered up his only begotten son,

Some interpreters make the words, “he who had received the promises,” refer to Isaac, thus: he offered up his only begotten son, who had received the promises. The former construction, which refers it to Abraham s receiving the promises, is more probable, as appears from the following verse. “Offered Isaac,” i.e., was aboutoffering him, and would have done so if he were not prevented; he did so in heart and will.

Heb 11:18  (To whom it was said: In Isaac shalt thy seed be called).

The seed promised him was to come only through Isaac. Hence, the heroic firmness of Abraham’s faith in sacrificing him.

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Commentaries for the Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

Today’s Mass Readings.

St Augustine on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:36-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:36-40.

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