The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:35, 37-39

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 27, 2011

Actually, this brief commentary is on verses 31-39.

31. What shall we say then to these things? If God is for us who is against us?
32. He who spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all: how has he not with him also given us all things?
33. Who shall accuse against the elect of God? God who justifies.
34. Who is it that condemns? Christ Jesus, who died, yes and rose again, who is at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us.
35. Who shall separate us from the charity of Christ? Tribulation? or anguish? or hunger? or nakedness? or peril? or persecution? or the sword?
36. (As it is written: For thy sake we are put to death all day; we are counted as sheep of slaughter).
37. But in all these things we overcome on account of him who loved us.
38. For I am certain that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor virtues, nor things present, nor things future, nor strength,
39. Nor height, nor the deep, nor any creature shall be able to separate us from the charity of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord
.

31. What shall we say? If God is on our side, what can all the power of the Roman Empire do against us? God, who has given us his Son, has, in him, given us all things. Why regard the world, says St. Chrysostom, when thou hast the world’s master; why care for thy possessions, when thou hast the heir? Who shall dare accuse the elect of God? Who shall presume to condemn those whom the Judge of the world absolves? Will Christ condemn? But he died for our sins, and, rising again, and seated at the right hand of God, is himself our intercessor. Impending persecution threatens us with trouble and distress, hunger and destitution, peril and death. These things cannot separate us from the charity of Christ. In these we are absolutely triumphant, more than conquerors (ὑπερνικάω = hupernikaō), because we suffer for the love of Christ, who suffered for love of us. I am absolutely confident and certain that neither threats of death nor offers of life, nor spiritual agencies, good or evil, were they evoked against us, nor the sufferings of the present, nor apprehensions for the future, nor the exaltation of prosperity, nor the depth of misery, no created thing, shall ever separate us from the charity which unites us to God through Jesus Christ onr Lord.

Cornelius a Lapide quotes numerous authorities to show that our Lord Jesus Christ really and properly intercedes for us in heaven. The quotation in verse 36 is from Ps 43:22. The word strength at the end of verse 38 is not
in the Greek text.

Corollary of Piety.
All creation cries out against you, with groaning and lamentation, if you pervert it to ends contrary to those for which its Maker created it.

God made the world for his glory, and to lead mankind to know and love him. By man’s malice it becomes an offence to its Maker. Man enjoys what he should use, uses what he should enjoy. All creation groans in unwilling
servitude to the evil desires of man. Use the creatures to God’s glory, with thanksgiving; if you would not have them cry out against you in the judgment, as their violator and polluter.

Three things frighten us when we think of the judgment day; our sins; our accuser; and our Judge.

But Christ died upon the cross to take away our sins. God spared not his own Son, but freely deli veered him up for us all.

Who shall accuse the elect of God? Who shall condemn, when he absolves! God is Judge of all, and it is he who justifies.

Christ will judge us at the last day, who died for us, rose again, and sits at God’s right hand, our Advocate and Intercessor. And we are sure that no power in heaven, or earth, or hell, will be able to separate us from the love with which he loves us. God has given us his Son, in whom are all things, and for whom are all things: what, then, will he withhold?

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2 Responses to “Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:35, 37-39”

  1. […] Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Todays’ Second Reading (Rom 8:35, 37-39). […]

  2. […] Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Todays’ Second Reading (Rom 8:35, 37-39). […]

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