The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for September 4th, 2011

This Weeks Posts: Sunday, Sept 4-Saturday, Sept 10

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 4, 2011

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Resources for Sunday Mass, Sept 4 (Ordinary and extraordinary Forms). A weekly feature of this blog. Resources for next Sunday will be posted on Wednesday or Thursday evening.

Today’s Divine Office.

Last Weeks Posts: Sunday, Aug. 28-Saturday, Sept. 3.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Col 1:24-2:3).

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Col 1:24-2:3).

Father Callan’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Col 1:24-2:3).

UPDATE: Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Today’s Psalm (62).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:6-11).

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:6-11).

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Col 2:6-15).

UPDATE: Father Boylan’s Introduction to Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary/Meditation on Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: St Augustine on Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Today’s Psalm (145).

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:12-19).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:12-19).

UPDATE: A Brief Summary of Next Sunday’s Readings.

UPDATE: Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on Romans 14:7-9 for Next Sunday, Sept 11.

UPDATE: Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 14:7-9 for Next Sunday, Sept 11.

UPDATE: Father Maas’ Commentary on Matt 18:21-35 for Next Sunday’s Mass, Sept 11.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Today’s First Readings (Col 3:1-11).

UPDATE: Father Boylan’s Introduction to Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary/Meditation on Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: St Augustine on Today’s Psalm (145).

UPDATE: St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Today’s Psalm (145).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:20-26).

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Today’s Mass ReadingsNote: the first reading is Micah 5:1-4a or, as an alternate reading, Romans 8:28-30.

Today’s Divine Office.

UPDATE: My Background Notes on Today’s First Reading (Micah 5:1-4a).

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Alternate Reading (Rom 8:28-30).

Maldonado ‘s Commentary-in Two Parts-on Today’s Gospel (Matt 1:1-16, 18-23): Previously posted for other occasions.

UPDATE: Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Matt 1:1-16, 18-23).

UPDATE: Sunday, Sept 11: Resources For Sunday Mass (Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms).

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
MEMORIAL OF ST PETER CLAVER, PRIEST

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Today’s First Reading (1 Tim 1:1-2, 12-14).

UPDATE: Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Today’s Psalm (16).

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:39-42).

MORE UPDATES FOR TODAY PENDING.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Today’s First Reading (1 Tim 1:15-17).

UPDATE: St Augustine on Today’s Psalm (113).

UPDATE: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Today’s Psalm (113).

UPDATE: Father Boylan’s Commentary on Today’s Psalm (113).

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Thursday, Sept 8: Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:28-30

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 4, 2011

28. But we know that to those who love God, all things co-operate for good, to those who are called Saints according to the purpose.
29. For whom he foreknew he also predestined to be made like the image of his Son, that he may be the firstborn among many brethren.
30. And whom he predestined, these he also called: and whom he called, these he also justified: and whom he justified, these he also glorified
.

28. We know not what to pray for as we ought: but, we know, and it is enough to know, that to those who love God, all things co-operate to good. No doubt this is said principally of trouble and persecution; but it is equally true of prosperity and happiness, as Liranus observes, and even of sins, from which the Christian rises again, humbler, stronger, more wary, and cautious, and will wear in his triumph the scars of the wounds he encountered in the struggle.

Called Saints according to the purpose. The word Saints is not in the Greek text. What is the purpose? Upon the answer to this question, depends the view we shall take of the vexed question of predestination; or else, which is the same thing, our interpretation of the purpose depends upon our view on the subject of predestination. And first, does the Apostle mean the purpose of man, or the purpose of God?

The Greek word πρόθεσις (prothesis)  is used in Scripture, and in the writings of Saint Paul, in both senses. Of the will of man. Acts 11:23, 27:12; 2 Tim 3:10, &c. Of the will of God, Rom 9:11.

The Greek fathers all understand, in the passage under consideration, the purpose and intention of the called; the good will, known to God, of those whom he calls. He says purpose, that we may not attribute all to vocation. For if vocation alone were sufficient, why are not all men saved? Salvation is not from vocation only, but also from the purpose of the called; the calling is not violent or by coercion. All are called; all do not obey. St. John Chrysostom.

He appropriately joins the purpose to the vocation; for he does not call all men absolutely, but those who have the purpose. Theodoret.

Man is called according to the purpose, that is, the man’s own will. Theophylact. The same statement is attributed to Origen.

Among the Latin writers, Ambrose says: Those are called according to the purpose, who God foresaw, when they believed, would be fitted for him, and were known before they believed. The same opinion is attributed to Saint Jerome.

This does not imply that the good will of man is the cause of God’s vocation, which is of his free grace alone; but all things co-operate to good to those who, being called, by their own purpose co-operate with God’s grace, freely
calling them.

All the commentators since Saint Augustine, on the other hand, understand by the purpose the eternal, free, gratuitous good pleasure and decree of God; but with this difference:

Some understand God’s gratuitous decree or determination of conferring eternal glory. All things co-operate to good to those who, loving God, are by his eternal determination to confer glory on them, called to faith and sanctifying grace. This is the view of Fromond and Estius.

Others understand God’s gratuitous counsel and decree to call mankind, lost in sin, to grace and holiness through Christ. So Cornelius, Menochius, Tyrinus. To those who, loving God, and in return loved by him, are called

by God’s benevolent purpose to faith and grace, all things co-operate to good. Here to be called according to the purpose means the purpose of grace, as in 4:5. And this, in the opinion of these writers, corresponds with the general drift of the Apostle in this Epistle, in which they consider that he makes no reference to gratuitous predestination to glory.

29. Whom he foreknew he predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, by a share in the sufferings of Christ. Here again we find a double explanation of these words, among those who, with St. Augustine, understand the purpose to mean the purpose of God. Those who consider the purpose to mean a gratuitous determination of God to confer glory, understand foreknew to signify, whom he loved from eternity. Such persons God predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in his sufferings and
in his glory.

Those on the other hand who consider the Apostle to mean predestination to grace, understand: those of whom God foresaw, and knew beforehand, that they would consent to the grace offered them, and would love him, and be his, these, according to this knowledge, he predestined to be made like the image of his Son, in grace, in suffering, and in glory.

In either case, it is clear that conformity to the suffering of Christ is an indispensable and evident mark of predestination. If we suffer, we shall also reign with him.

30. Whom he predestined, these he also called. Saint Chrysostom, and the Greek fathers understand: those to whom God’s Providence extended the grace of conversion to the faith of Christ, he calls; justifies in the laver of
regeneration; glorifies by the gift of the Holy Spirit, and adoption as sons of God. So Theodoret and Theophylact, This is quite admissible in the sense of the Greek word δοξάζω (doxazō translated glorified in the text), rendered great, celebrated, or illustrious. (The Greek aorist admits the sense of the present as easily as that of preterite). Ambrose translates it by magnificavit, magnified them to the likeness of the Son of God.

The supporters of absolute and purely gratuitous predestination to glory understand that those whom God has so predestinated he calls, justifies by grace and final perseverance, and finally crowns with eternal glory. And the past tense is used of that which is in great part future, because the whole has been long since determined in the counsels of God, and is sure of ultimate accomplishment.

Lastly, those who hold predestination to glory to be on the ground of foreseen merit, and that what the Apostle is here speaking of, is predestination to conformity to the Son of God in grace and suffering, understand it thus: Those who God foresees will love him, these he predestines to be conformed to the likeness of his Son by patient
endurance of suffering; calls by his grace; justifies, or makes mere just and holy by that submission and endurance; and makes them great, glorious, and illustrious, as his saints and servants, crowning them, if they persevere,
with eternal glory in the life to come.

This explanation is grounded on the general scope and object of this Epistle, which is to exhort the faithful to patient endurance of persecution, in hope of an eternal reward. Tyrinus quotes a large number of authorities in favour of it, both ancient and modern.

Observation. Both the two opinions above referred to, in interpretation
of the words called according to the purpose, viz., that which understands God’s gratuitous purpose to confer glory on certain persons: and that which refers it to the purpose of conferring grace on all baptized Christians: are
both probable, and both Catholic; both have some foundation in Scripture and tradition; and either may be held by a Catholic. Without entering on any dispute upon a point which the Church leaves open, or presuming to pronounce upon that which the Church has not decided, I am inclined to adopt the second interpretation as more in accordance, first with the scope and object of this Epistle, and secondly, with the general teaching of Saint
Paul. Some remarks on the particular object of this Epistle will be made in the notes on Ch 9. The general teaching of Saint Paul includes, and is necessarily in a great degree grounded on, his statement, 1 Tim 2:4, that God will have all men saved and come to the recognition of truth. It will be shown in the reflections on that passage, that all distinctions restrictive of this statement are alien from the mind of the Apostle. There is some difficulty in reconciling it with the first of the opinions just adverted to; and it is much more easily reconcilable with the second. This is, that God’s determination is to give
grace, gratuitously and in the absence of any human merit, of his pure benevolence and goodness. Anything obscure or ambiguous in the words of any writer may fairly be interpretated in the light of the same writer’s words, where they are clear, and commentators and interpreters have no doubt about his meaning. On this rule, the words of the Apostle in the text, being in some degree ambiguous and uncertain in their sense, may reasonably
be understood and interpreted with reference to his plain declaration elsewhere: God would have all men saved.

In this view, verses 28, 29, and 30 of this chapter may be paraphrased as follows: We know not what to pray for, or how to pray; but we know that by the direction of God’s mercy, all things co-operate to good, to those whom God loves, and has by the benevolent purpose of his heart called to faith and sanctifying grace, and who, loving God, obey this call. For those who he foreknew would by the aid of his grace become like the image of his Son, our
pattern and exemplar, these foreseeing that they would be such, he predestined to this conformity; in order that Jesus Christ, who as God is only begotten, may as man be the first-born among many adopted brethren, by grace partakers of the divine nature, jand brothers of Jesus Christ. Those whom in consequence of this prescience he thus predestines, he calls and justifies, and persevering in justice, glorifies.

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