The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for October, 2011

R.I.P. Dim Bulb

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 31, 2011

No, I’m not dead (sorry if you’re disappointed). I need to take a break from the grind of blogging; catch up on a little reading; and spend some time with anybody, or anything, other than DELL LATITUDE.

I will post resources for this coming Sunday’s Mass, probably on Wednesday. Blogging will probably resume next weekend, or the following weekend.

What I Hope To Be Reading:

I pre-ordered the two latest volumes in the Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture series (First Corinthians and 1 & 2 Peter, Jude). I saved a good bit of money by doing this and they should arrive within the next day or two. I”m also working my way through various commentaries on Isaiah.

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This Weeks Posts: Sunday, October 23-Saturday, October 29

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 31, 2011

NOT MUCH BLOGGING WILL BE DONE in this and the following several weeks as I am currently in the process of preparing posts for the Advent Season which begins Sunday, November 27. I may add some further commentaries on the first readings. These will be marked UPDATE.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23
THIRTIETH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Mass Resources (Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms). Resources for next Sunday’s Mass will be posted on Wednesday. Some commentaries on next Sunday’s readings are already posted under Wednesday.

Today’s Divine Office.

Last Weeks Posts: Sunday, Oct 16-Saturday, Oct 22.

My Notes on Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11 for the Second Sunday of Advent.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24
MONDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Romans 8:12-17).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 13:10-17).

Two of the Most Ridiculous Things I’ve Ever Seen. These videos are like scenes from a campy Hollywood movie.

UPDATE: What is Our Lord Saying to American Catholics? From biblical scholar Peter Williamson comes this post; part 1 of a timely peace during a financial crunch.

UPDATE: Idiots on Parade.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25
TUESDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Romans 8:18-25). This post includes comments on verses 26-27 as well.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary/Meditation on Today’s Psalm (126).

St Augustine’s Notes on Today’s Psalm (126).

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Today’s Psalm (126).

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 13:18-21).

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26
WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Romans 8:26-30)The first two verses of this commentary were included in yesterday’s post, so if they sound familiar you know why.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Today’s Psalm (13). Psalm 12 in the numbering of the Psalter used by Aquinas.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 13:22-30).

Resources for Sunday Mass, October 30 (Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matt 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

Sunday Gospel Scripture Study on Matt 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011. Audio/Video.

St Albert the Great on Psalm 131 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 131 (130) for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27
THURSDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Romans 8:31b-39).

St Augustine’s’ Notes on Today’s Psalm 109 (108). These notes are on the entire Psalm, however, you can scroll down to the paragraph numbered “20” and begin reading there.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 13:31-35).

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28
FEAST OF SAINT SIMON AND SAINT JUDE, APOSTLES

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Ephesians 2:19-22).

Father Callan’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Ephesians 2:19-22).

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Today’s Psalm 19 (18). Latin and English side by side. In Aquinas’ version of the Psalter this Psalm was numbered as “18.”

St Augustine’s Notes on Today’s Psalm 19 (18).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 6:12-16).

Pope Benedict XVI on Saint Simon and Saint Jude.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on the Epistle of St Jude.

Part 1: Bible Study Podcast on the Epistle of St Jude. Audio study from St Irenaeus Ministries.

Part 2: Bible Study on the Epistle of St Jude. Audio Study from St Irenaeus Ministries.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29
SATURDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Today’s First Reading (Romans 11:1-2, 11-12, 25-29).

St Augustine’s Notes on Today’s Psalm 94 (93).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Luke 14:1, 7-11).

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6th Update: Send in the Clowns (i.e., the Tools, the Fools and the College Professors)

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 29, 2011

As she puts it, she dreams of a “society without it haftin’ to be uproared you know fear of what governent is constantly puttin’ on us.You can’t make this up.

Little Diversity Among Occupy Chicago Protestors. Spoiled white kids, mostly. Apparently, mommy and daddy can’t give them enough “stuff.”

Fraudulent London Protest. I may have linked to a similar story a few days ago.

Gang Rape at Occupy Glasgow?

Another Up-And Coming Lefty Mayor’s Discontent With Occupiers. When filthy hippies and hypocrites congregate things tend to get, well, filthy.

Terrorist Links? Occupy Chicago leaders under FBI investigation.

Occupy Oakland Riots: A Timeline.

I Am Radically Repeating What I Was Told. The intellectual equivalent to being a lemming.

No Need to Fear “The Man.” Not when heavily armed Neo-Nazi’s are on patrol. If only every movement in the country could be this safe.

UPDATE 1:

Gee, It Sounds Almost CorporateAn Occupy Portland activist received death threats after she incorporated the group and blocked fellow activists from accessing the website. Oh… And $20,000 also went missing (Where are the Cons?).

What Happens When Intellectual/Moral Derelicts Collide With Material Derelicts? How dare you “professional homeless” try to sponge off us amateur homeless when we’ve left our homes to sponge of “The Man”!

The Pitfalls of Organizing Anarchy“As organizers tried in vain to call off the march, scores of demonstrators splintered off and broke through a wall of cops — some of them even swiping a roll of orange netting used to kettle the large crowd”

When Senator Feinstein is Almost the Voice of Reason You Know Things Are Crazy.

Farmer’s Market Forced to Relocate. We all know the stuff grows in manure, but no one wants to buy their veggies in a cesspool.

Are Banks the Occupier’s Next Targets?

UPDATE 2:

Former Grand Wizard of the KKK Endorses the Occupiers. I guess he didn’t want to place second to the Neo-Nazis at being timely and relevant.

UPDATE 3

Smells Like Hippie Spirit. Raw sewage gives the perfect ambiance for fights, gang-beatings, drugs, nudity and the harassment of cops. “How Low How Low How Low”.

I’ll Cut Stencil You, Man! Long! Wide! Deep! and Continuously! The pen is not mightier than the NYPD.

When Should You Shoot a Cop?  “The letter is blatantly anti-government and anti-law enforcement in nature.  It not only condones but even encourages citizens to kill any “government agent” (i.e. law enforcement officers), who in their perception violates their rights.” Oh, and the war on drugs is “fascist”.

Time to Retreat to Mommy’s Basement.

Political Pimps and Pismires.

UPDATE 4:

Olbermann’s Heir Apparent?

Revolution Will Require Collapsing the American Government. Someone should tell this aging punk that his teacher’s union is a major force behind Illinois’ fiscal woes.

Madison Occupiers Permit Rejected. Apparently, some among them were, umm, flogging the dolphin in public. Well, at least they weren’t advocating what their fellow zombies in New York were.

UPDATE 5:

Gee, Who Didn’t See This Coming? Anarchists descending into anarchy among themselves; who’d have thunk it?

Fleabaggers Versus Tea Party by the Numbers.

Portland Occupiers Vandalize, Dance on War Memorial.

UPDATE: 6

Nothing Says Revolution Like Bong Smoke in the Air; Cheetohs’ Dust on the Fingers; and Bob Marley on the Sound System.

Violence in the People’s Republic of Berkeley.

I Wonder if she Worked for Acorn.

Just How Much Trouble is the Human Gene Pool?

The Occupy Rap Sheet So Far.

Updates coming.

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Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 11:1-2a, 11-12, 25-29

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 29, 2011

This post, in order to help provide context, includes Fr. Callan’s Summaries of verses 1-10, 11-24, and 25-32.

THE REJECTION OF ISRAEL IS AFTER ALL ONLY PARTIAL

A Summary of Romans 11:1-10~Having shown in the preceding chapter that the rejection of the Jews was due to their own persistent disobedience and obstinacy to the will of God and the divine overtures, St. Paul now is at pains to observe that God, notwithstanding, has by no means ceased to be merciful to His chosen people. For their rejection is not complete; a good number have been converted, although the others have been hardened.

1. I say then: Hath God cast away his people? God forbid. For I also am an Israelite of the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin.

After all the Apostle has said about the culpability and responsibility of the Jews (9:30-10:21), one would be inclined to think that Israel had been entirely rejected and had ceased to be the people of God. But even before this, when speaking of the absolute right of God to choose or to reject whom He will (9:6-26), the Apostle had insinuated, in a passing way, that there was still, as in former times of apostasy, a faithful remnant in whom the mercy of God was manifest. Here, borrowing the words of Psalm 94:14, he asks the question plainly whether God hath cast away his people. The answer must be negative, first because the Apostle’s teaching cannot be contrary to the promise of the inspired Psalmist. In the second place, he refers to himself, who was an Israelite of the seed of Abraham, i.e., a carnal descendant of the father of the Jewish race, and a member of the tribe of Benjamin which, with the tribes of Juda and Levi, had, in the past, remained faithful to the Lord (2 Cor 11:22; Philip, 3:5). Finally, if God had entirely rejected the Jews, He would not have selected from among them “the ministers of Christ, and the dispensers of his mysteries” (1 Cor 4:1), and sent them out to preach the faith to the Gentiles (1:5). So much for an indirect reply to the question proposed.

2. God hath not cast away his people, which he foreknew. Know you not what the scripture saith of Elias; how he calleth on God against Israel?

St. Paul now responds directly to the above question. It is impossible that God should reject entirely and definitely all the Jews, because God does not thus change His eternal decrees (see verses 28-29).

Which he foreknew, i.e., which he formerly recognized and willingly approved as His own people. There is no question here of those who God foreknew would be faithful to Him, or of the predestined (Cornely), but of the Jewish people as a whole, who would not be finally cast off by God.

Know you not, etc. The Apostle draws an example from the history of Elias (1 Kings 19:10) to illustrate the designs of God in the present instance. It seemed to Elias that the whole people had fallen into idolatry and had been rejected by God; but God revealed to the Prophet that a remnant had been preserved. So it is now. While it seems that all Israel has been rejected, there is no doubt that some will be saved.

The scripture, i.e., that section of the Old Testament which deals with Elias (cf. Mark 12:26; Luke 22:37).

Against Israel, i.e., accusing Israel.

THE REJECTION OF ISRAEL IS NOT FINAL, AND SERVES MEANWHILE FOR THE CONVERSION OF THE GENTILES

A Summary of Romans 11:11-24~The rejection of the majority of the Jews is a source of great mystery and profound sorrow. And yet there is reason for consolation, because, in the first place, a few have been saved already, and then, the rejection of the nation as a whole is only a temporary evil which, in the designs of God, is made to serve for the conversion of the Gentiles.

11. I say then, have they so stumbled, that they should fall? God forbid. But by their offence, salvation is come to the Gentiles, that they may be emulous of them.

Have they so stumbled, that, etc. Comely and others give to “that” (ινα) the sense of finality, as if St. Paul wished to ask if God, by justly withdrawing His graces from the Jews, blinded their greater number and permitted them to stumble for the purpose of making them fall without any hope of reparation. In this opinion, there is question here, not of the gravity, but of the purpose or end of the Jews’ fall. But St. Chrysostom,  Lagrange, etc., hold that ινα has not a final meaning here, and that the sense is rather, whether the fall of the Jews is so great as to admit of no cure or remedy. At any rate, the stumbling of the Jews was not just that they might fall, nor that their fall should be irremediable, as the Apostle’s reply, vigorously negative, plainly shows, and as is clear from what follows in the verse. St. Paul then goes on to explain the designs of God in permitting the Jews to go astray.

By their offence, etc., i.e., through the blindness of the Jews in not recognizing the Messiah and their unwillingness to accept the Apostle’s preaching (Acts 13:45-48) the Gospel was carried to the Gentiles, and the error of the Jews became the occasion of the salvation of the pagans. This is the first and immediate result of the fall of the Jews. The second result is the salvation of the Jews themselves; for the salvation given to the Gentiles will finally rouse Israel to competition and emulation (παραζηλωσαι αυτους). The Jews will at length understand that their God has become the God of the Gentiles, that the Scriptures given to them have passed to others, and that God has withdrawn His blessings from His chosen people and bestowed them upon their pagan neighbors. When this takes place, the anger and jealousy of the Jews will have reached their climax and will be the occasion of a reaction against past errors, and a consequent return to the God of their forefathers. Thus, the hardening of Israel permitted by God was ordained to the salvation of the Gentiles, and the salvation of the Gentiles is ordained in turn to that of the Jews themselves (cf.
Lagrange, h. 1.).

12. Now if the offence of them be the riches of the world, and the
diminution of them, the riches of the Gentiles; how much more the fulness of them?

If the failure of Israel has brought such great benefits to the world, how enormous will be the benefit of the final conversion of all the Jews!

If the offence (παραπτωμα) of them (αυτων), i.e., of those hardened, be the riches of the world, i.e., be the occasion of the conversion of the Gentiles to the faith, and the diminution (ηττημα) of them (αυτων), i.e., the defeat, the loss of those hardened, be the means of inestimable blessings to the pagans, how much more the fulness (πληρωμα) of them(αυτων), i.e., how much greater blessings will come to the world from the total conversion to the faith of all the Jews!

In this interpretation, following Lagrange, we have given to the first and second αυτων (“them”) the meaning of those hardened, and to the third, the meaning of all the Jews. We have understood ηττημα (“diminution”) here to mean, not the remnant, a small number; but defeat, loss.  πληρωμα (“fulness”) means the completing of Israel, i.e., the adding of the hardened (who will cease to be such) to the faithful Jews.

THE CONVERSION OF THE GENTILES WILL BE FOLLOWED BY THAT OF THE JEWS

A Summary of Romans 11:25-32~God’s final purpose is to save both Gentiles and Jews. They both have sinned and have been made to feel the wrath of God (1:18-2:29), but infinite mercy outstretches man’s wickedness and in the end will triumph over all; God’s designs do not change, nor does His will go unfulfilled. The salvation of all Israel is closely connected with the conversion of the Gentiles, as was foretold by the Prophets. It is according to the divine plan that Israel and the pagans should mutually help each other, and that both in the end should be objects of the divine mercy.

25. For I would not have you ignorant, brethren, of this mystery (lest you should be wise in your own conceits), that blindness in part has happened in Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles should come in.

I would not have you ignorant, brethren. This is a favorite phrase of St. Paul’s when he wishes to speak confidentially and announce some matter of great importance (Rom 1:13; 1 Cor 10:1; 12:1; 2 Cor 1:8; 1 Thess 4:13). He is speaking to the Gentile Christians, and he wishes to remind them of doctrines already familiar to the Church in general, namely, that the Jews were to be hardened (Matt 12:38-48; 13:11-16; 23:29-36), that the failure of Israel would bring in the Gentiles (Matt 20:1-16; 24:14), and that the Jews themselves would at last turn to Christ (Matt 23:39; Luke 13:35).

This mystery, i.e., the final conversion of Israel to Christianity, which will take place after the conversion of the Gentiles, but before the end of the world. St. Paul calls this great truth a mystery, because it could not be known short of revelation, and was in fact revealed to him by God along with the other truths of the Gospel of Christ (Gal 1:12, 16; Eph 2:11-22; 3:1-13).

Lest you be wise, etc. The quotation is from Prov 3:7. The Apostle is admonishing the Gentiles to guard against self-conceit, as if they had merited their call to the faith, and also against despising the rejected Jews.

Blindness in part, etc. While the Jews as a people had failed to accept the Gospel, a number of them had been converted. And the blindness or obduracy of the majority is not to last forever; but until the fulness of the Gentiles shall come in, i.e., until the other nations of the world have accepted the Gospel and entered the Church of Christ. It is to be noted that this fulness of the Gentiles relates to peoples, not to individuals: all the nations or peoples of the earth will be converted to Christ before the end of the world, but not all the individuals of each nation (St. Thomas, Cornely, Lagrange, etc.).

God, therefore, in His all-wise designs has called a few of the Jews to the faith already. He has made the incredulity of the majority the occasion of the conversion of the Gentiles, and this latter He will make in turn the occasion for the final call to the faith of all the Jews. We have no sign, however, that this general conversion of the world will be soon. Here it may be useful to recall what Origen said on this subject: “God only knows, and His Only-begotten Son, and any friends that may be privy to His secrets, what is all Israel that is to be saved, and what is the fulness of the Gentiles that is to come in.”

26. And so all Israel should be saved, as it is written: There shall come out of Sion, he that shall deliver, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob.

All Israel does not mean the predestined (St. Augustine), nor all the Jews taken individually (St. Thomas), but the mass of the people, as opposed to individuals who are converted during the time that intervenes before the last days come. Israel then as a nation, like the other nations of the world, will finally embrace the faith; but it will not be until after all those others have been gathered in that she shall enter the fold of Christ. What fate has overtaken or awaits those Jews who have been hardened meanwhile, St. Paul does not anywhere tell us.

As it is written. The Apostle has been speaking of a mystery which he has learned through revelation, and he confirms the truth of it by showing that it was already more or less clearly foretold in the Old Test. (Isa 59:20). The citation is fairly literal from the LXX, which faithfully follows the Hebrew with the exception that where the latter has “out of Sion,” the LXX has “for Sion’s sake.” In the best MSS. the quotation is read as follows: “There shall come out of Sion the deliverer: he shall turn away impieties from Jacob.” St. Paul seems to make the citation refer in a general way to the Second Coming of Christ, although the conversion of the Jews will just precede that Second Coming, and will be a consequence of the first advent of the Saviour.

27. And this is to them my covenant: when I shall take away their sins.

The first part of this verse is from chapter 59:21, and the second from chapter 27:9 of the Prophet Isaias. God promises to make a new alliance with the people of Israel, when He will take away their sins and confer upon them forever His spirit and His doctrine.

In verses 25-27 we have the following unfulfilled prophecies: (a) Before the end of the world all Gentile nations shall be converted to Christianity, that is, the greater part of all nations, not all the individuals of each nation (St. Thomas); (b) after the conversion of the Gentiles, but before the end of the world, the Jews as a people will embrace Christianity. The fulfillment of these prophecies, and therefore the end of all things seem yet far off.

28. As concerning the gospel, indeed, they are enemies for your sake: but as touching the election, they are most dear for the sake of the fathers.

The present incredulity of the Jews will not hinder the final realization of God’s promises to them. God still loves them in their faithful ancestors.

As concerning the gospel, i.e., inasmuch as they have wilfully rejected the Gospel, the only means of salvation, they are enemies (εχθροι, odiosi), i.e., hateful to God (St. Thomas, Lagrange, etc.), and so have been excluded by God from their Messianic inheritance. This has happened to them, in the designs of God, for your sake, i.e., for the benefit of you Gentiles, because their unfaithfulness has been the occasion of your call to the Gospel (verses 11, 12, 15).

But as touching the election, i.e., as regards their election from among all other peoples, by which they were made God’s chosen people and the depositories and custodians of God’s special revelation and divine promises, they are most dear to God for the sake of their fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob— God’s special friends and faithful servants.

29. For the gifts and the calling of God are without repentance.

God will not forsake His people forever, because His special gifts and calling are without repentance, and are consequently not subject to change (cf. 2 Cor 7:10). The Apostle is not speaking here of an invariable rule of Providence as regards creatures, but only of the great designs of God, such as respected the gifts and privileges of Israel and the latter’s call to be the adopted people of the Most High. As regards these privileges God will never change, or repent of having conceded them, because He pledged them to the Patriarchs with an oath
(Deut 7:6-11). Despite, therefore, the unfaithfulness of the Jews, God will be true to His promises and will one day convert them as a whole to the faith. The call still holds if Israel will hear.

We read in 1 Kings 15:11 that God repented that He had chosen Saul; but the rejection of this king was only an episode, comparable to the temporary hardening of the Jews (Lagrange).

 

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Sunday, October 30, 2011:Resources For Sunday Mass (Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms)

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 26, 2011

This post contains resources for both Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms of the Roman Rite. The readings in the two forms differ. Some links below are listed as Pending and will be made available as soon as possible. Updates, if any, will be marked UPDATE. The Extraordinary Form celebrates the Feast of Christ the King on the last Sunday of October. In the Ordinary Form it is celebrated on the last Sunday of the Liturgical Year (this year, November 20).

ORDINARY FORM
THIRTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

St Albert the Great on Psalm 131 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 131 (130) for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

UPDATE: The LORD’s Word to Priests and People Through the Prophet Malachi. Blog post on today’s first reading by Catholic biblical scholar Peter Williamson.

UPDATE: Background on the Prophet Malachi.

UPDATE: Audio Podcast Study of the Book of Malachi: (St Irenaeus Ministries)~

  • Part 1. Introduction, study of 1:1-11.
  • Part 2. Study of  1:11-2:9.
  • Part 3. Study of 2:10-3:6.
  • Part 4. Study of 3:7 to the end.

Aquinas’ Lecture on 1 Thess 2:7b-9, 13. Read both lectures under chapter 2.

Pending. My Notes on 1 Thess 2:7b-9, 13.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matt 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011.

Sunday Gospel Scripture Study on Matt 23:1-12 for Sunday Mass, Oct 30, 2011. Audio/Video.

UPDATE: The Sacred Page Podcast. Catholic biblical scholar Michael Barber talks on his radio show about today’s Gospel. Read his brief blog post and then click on the podcast link at the end of it to listen to his talk.

Word Sunday:

  • FIRST READING The prophet Malachi railed against Temple leaders who sort personal gain over the role of the shepherd. His message was simple: lead or lose your position.
  • PSALM Psalm 131 was a hymn of humility and, thus, of hope.
  • SECOND READING St. Paul had fond memories of and mutual attraction for the Thessalonians in his first letter to that community. In this sense, Paul was a Christian leader, for he walked in the shoes of the local Church.
  • GOSPEL In Matthew’s gospel, Jesus called on the Christian leaders to better their counterparts among the Pharisees. Christians were to serve, not to be served.
  • CHILDREN’S READINGS In the story for the first reading, Max was accused of a crime he did not commit. He stood alone, with only half the truth known. We are to find the whole truth, not to spread rumors. In the story for the gospel, Dusty betrayed others by being irresponsible on Halloween. He lost the trust and respect of others. Jesus warned us against such irresponsibility.
  • FAMILY ACTIVITY To bring home the gospel message, role play “Titles and Jobs.” Develop job descriptions for family members as a means to discuss leadership qualities.

Gospel Reading With Meditation.

Historical Cultural Context.

Thoughts From the Early Church. Excerpt from Commentary on Matthew’s Gospel by Paschasius Radbertus.

Scripture in Depth.

Catholic Matters. Readings with brief explanations.

Parish Bible Study. Notes on the readings.

Lector Notes. Gives brief historical and theological background. Can be printed out, copied and used as bulletin insert.

Dr. Scott Hahn Podcast. Brief, does good job of highlighting the major theme(s) of the writings. A typo on the site incorrectly identifies this Sunday as the 21st.

Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily. Fr. Barron is a noted speaker and theologian.

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
LAST SUNDAY OF OCTOBER, FEAST OF CHRIST THE KING

Today’s Roman Missal. Prayers, readings, etc in Latin and English side by side.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on Colossians 1:12-20. Read lectures 3, 4, and 5.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:12-20. This post contains commentary on verses 9-20.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:12-20. This post contains commentary on verses 9-23.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 18:33-37. Contains commentary on verses 33-38.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 18:33-37. Contains commentary on verses 33-38.

Aquinas’ Lecture on John 18:33-37. Scroll down to lecture 6.

My Notes on John 18:33-37.

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Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 18:33-38

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 26, 2011

Ver 33. Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again, and called Jesus, and said to him, Are you the King of the Jews?34. Jesus answered him, Say you this thing of yourself, or did others tell it you of me?35. Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Your own nation and the chief priests have delivered you to me: what have you done?36. Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from here.37. Pilate therefore said to him, Are you a king then? Jesus answered, you say that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness to the truth. Every one that is of the truth hears my voice.38. Pilate says to him, What is truth?

CHRYS. Pilate, wishing to rescue Him from the hatred of the c Jews, protracted the trial a long time. Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall, and called Jesus.

THEOPHYL. i.e. Apart, because he had a strong suspicion that He was innocent, and thought he could examine Him more accurately, away from the crowd: and said to Him, Are you the King of the Jews?

ALCUIN. Wherein Pilate shows that the Jews had charged Him with calling Himself King of the Jews.

CHRYS. Or Pilate had heard this by report; and as the Jews had no charge to bring forward, began to examine Him himself with respect to the things commonly reported of Him.  Jesus answered him, Say you this thing of yourself, or did others tell it you of Me?

THEOPHYL. He intimates here that Pilate was judging blindly and indiscreetly: If you say this thing of yourself, He says, bring forward proofs of My rebellion; if you have heard it from others, make regular inquiry into it.

AUG. Our Lord knew indeed both what He Himself asked, and what Pilate would answer; but He wished it to be written down n for our sakes.

CHRYS. He asks not in ignorance, but in order to draw from Pilate himself an accusation against the Jews: Pilate answered Bred, Am I a Jew? Your own nation and the chief priests have delivered you to me.

AUG. He rejects the imputation that He could have said it of Himself; Your own nation and the chief priests have delivered you to me: adding, what have you done? Whereby he shows that this charge had been brought against Him, for it is as much as to say, If you deny that you are a King, what have you done to be delivered up to me? As if it were no wonder that He should be delivered up, if He called Himself a King.

CHRYS. He then tries to bring round the mind of Pilate, not a very bad man, by proving to him, that He is not a mere man, but God, and the Son of God; and overthrowing all suspicion of His having aimed at a tyranny, which Pilate was afraid of, Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world.

AUG. This is what the good Master wished to teach us. But first it was necessary to show the falsity of the notions of both Jews and Gentiles as to His kingdom, which Pilate had heard of; as if it meant that He aimed at unlawful power; a crime punishable with death, and this kingdom were a subject of jealousy to the ruling power, and to be guarded against as likely to be hostile either to the Romans or Jews. Now if our Lord had answered immediately Pilate’s question, He would have seemed to have been answering not the Jews, but the Gentiles only. But after Pilate’s answer, what He says is an answer to both Gentiles and Jews: as if He said, Men, i.e. Jews and Gentiles, I hinder not your dominion in this world. What more would you have? Come by faith to the kingdom which is not of this world. For what is His kingdom, but they that believe in Him, of whom He says, you are not of the world: although He wished that they should be in the world. In the same way, here He does not say, My kingdom is not in this world; but, is not of this world. Of the world are all men, who created by God are born of the corrupt race of Adam. All that are born again in Christ, are made a kingdom not of this world. Thus hath God taken us out of the power of darkness, and translated us to the kingdom of His dear Son.

CHRYS. Or He means that He does not derive His kingdom from the same source that earthly kings do; but that He has his sovereignty from above; inasmuch as He is not mere man, but far greater and more glorious than man: If My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews. Here He shows the weakness of an earthly kingdom, has its strength from its servants, whereas that higher kingdom is sufficient to itself, and wanting in nothing. And if His kingdom was thus the greater of the two, it follows that He was taken of His own will, and delivered up Himself.

AUG, After showing that His kingdom was not of this world, He adds, But now My kingdom is not from here. He does not say, Not here, for His kingdom is here to the end of the world, having within it the tares mixed with the wheat until the harvest. But yet it is not from here, since it is a stranger in the world.

THEOPHYL, Or He says, from here, not, here; because He reigns in the world, and carries on the government of it, and disposes all things according to His will; but His kingdom is not from below, but from above, and before all ages.

CHRYS. Heretics infer from these words that our Lord is a different person from the Creator of the world. But when He says, My kingdom is not from here, He does not deprive the world of His government and superintendence, but only shows that His government is not human and corruptible.   Pilate therefore said to Him, Are you a King then? Jesus answered, you say that I am a King.
AUG. He did not fear to confess Himself a King, but so replied as neither to deny that He was, nor yet to confess Himself a King in such sense as that His kingdom should be supposed to be of this w world. He says, you say, meaning, you being carnal say it carnally. He continues, To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that 1 should bear witness to the truth. The pronoun here, in hoc, must not be dwelt long on as if it meant, in hâc re, but shortened, as if it stood, ad hoc, natus sum, as the next words are, ad hoc veni in mundum. Wherein it is evident He alludes to His birth in the flesh not to that divine birth which never had beginning.

THEOPHYL. Or, to Pilate’s question whether He w as a King our Lord answers, To this end was I born, i.e. to be a King, That I am born from a King. proves that I am a King.

CHRYS. If then He was a King by birth, He has nothing which He has not received from another. For this I came, that I should bear witness to the truth, i.e. that I should make all men believe it. We must observe how He shows His humility here: when they accused Him as a malefactor, He bore it in silence; but when He is asked of His kingdom, then He talks with Pilate, instructs him, and raises his mind to higher things. That I should bear witness to the truth shows that He had no crafty purpose in what He did.

AUG But when Christ bears witness to the truth, He bears witness to Himself; as He said above, I am the truth. But inasmuch as all men have not faith, He adds, Everyone that is of the truth hears My voice: hears, that is, with the inward ear; obeys My voice, believes Me. Every one that is of the truth, has reference to the grace by which He calls according to His purpose. For as regards the nature in which we are created, since the truth created all, all are of the truth. But it is not all to whom it is given the truth to obey the truth. For had He even said, Everyone one that hears My voice is of the truth, it still would be thought that such were of the truth, because they obeyed the truth But He does not say this, but Everyone that is of the truth hears My voice. A man then is not of the truth, because he hears His voice, but hears His voice because he is of the truth. This grace is conferred upon him by the truth.

CHRYS. These words have an effect upon Pilate, persuade him to become a hearer, and elicit from him the short inquiry, What is truth had almost said to Him, What is truth?

THEOPHYL. For it had almost vanished from the world, and become unknown in consequence of the general unbelief.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Devotional Resources, fathers of the church, Latin Mass Notes, liturgy, Notes on the Gospel of John, Notes on the Lectionary, Quotes, Scripture, St Thomas Aquinas | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

My Notes on John 18:33-37

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 26, 2011

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These were taken from a post on (18-28-19:16).

18:33  Pilate entered the praetorium again and called Jesus, and said to him, “Are you the King of the Jews?”
18:34  Jesus answered, “Do you say this of your own accord, or did others say it to you about me?”
18:35  Pilate answered, “Am I a Jew? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me; what have you done?”
18:36  Jesus answered, “My kingship is not of this world; if my kingship were of this world, my servants would fight, that I might not be handed over to the Jews; but my kingship is not from the world.”
18:37  Pilate said to him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice.”
18:38a  What is truth?

33-34.  Are you the King of the Jews?…Do you say this of your own accord, or did others say it to you about me?

The words “are you the king of the Jews” are often taken by translators as a straightforward question;  in fact they form a derisive statement masquerading as a question. The Greek text would more properly be translated thus: Pilate entered the praetorium again and called Jesus, and said to him (not “asked him”), “You (emphatic) are the King of the Jews!” Father John Paul Heil give the following meaning in his commentary BLOOD AND WATER: “You (of all people!) are the King of the Jews.” Father Heil goes on to note that the words have an ironic quality for the faithful reader, for on a deeper level they can be taken as true: “You (surely) are the King of the Jews.”

Do you say this of your own accord. Theophylactus: “He intimates here that Pilate was judging blindly and indiscreetly: If you say this thing of yourself, He says, bring forward proofs of My rebellion; if you have heard it from others, make regular inquiry into it.”

35. Pilate answered, “Am I a Jew? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me; what have you done?”

Am I a Jew? Here we see Pilate’s bigotry and animosity towards the Jews, which would eventually lead to his deposition as Procurator.  His question is emphatic, demanding an answer of “no,” for the mere thought of the other response sickens him.

Pilate insists that what is taking place is a thoroughly Jewish matter, but the mere presence of Jesus at the interrogation makes that a lie; indeed, handed you over to me and what have you done witness against Pilate’s claim.

36. Jesus answered, “My kingship is not of this world; if my kingship were of this world, my servants would fight, that I might not be handed over to the Jews; but my kingship is not from the world.

Recalls the action and subsequent rebuke of Peter in the garden.

Catholic Commentary On Holy Scripture: “Jesus does not answer this (i.e., Pilate’s) question, except by clearly defining what his kingship is. It is not of terrestrial origin. If it were, his guards— the military force which in that hypothesis he would have had—would have striven against his arrest. Consequently his kingship is not ‘from hence’ (translated “this world”)— terrestrial—and therefore he is no Palestinian rival of the majesty of Roman Tiberius”

St John Chrysostom: “He means that He does not derive His kingdom from the same source that earthly kings do; but that He has his sovereignty from above; inasmuch as He is not mere man, but far greater and more glorious than man: If My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews. Here He shows the weakness of an earthly kingdom, has its strength from its servants, whereas that higher kingdom is sufficient to itself, and wanting in nothing. And if His kingdom was thus the greater of the two, it follows that He was taken of His own will, and delivered up Himself.”

For a fuller treatment of the significance of our Lord’s words, consult The Passion Of Jesus In The Gospel Of John, by Father Donald Senior, pages 80-81.  The emphasis is not on space (heaven up there, earth down here), rather the differing realities of this world and the one “from above” are being described in spatial categories.

37. So you are a king…you say that I am a king.  Pilate’s accusation/question is parried by our Lord, who basically admits to being a king, just not in the sense posed by Pilate.

St Augustine: “He did not fear to confess Himself a King, but so replied as neither to deny that He was, nor yet to confess Himself a King in such sense as that His kingdom should be supposed to be of this w world. He says, you say, meaning, you being carnal say it carnally. He continues, To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that 1 should bear witness to the truth.”

Fathers Nolan and Brown: “In response to Pilate’s question…Jesus proceeds to explain that His is not that mighty temporal kingdom for which the Jews had hoped, and which the Romans might well fear; if it were, His followers would surely have striven that He should not be delivered to the Jews; but in truth it was not a temporal Kingdom.  My kingdom is not from hence; i.e., is not of this world, not a temporal kingdom.  In this world it was, and is; but of this world it is not (see 17:15-16).”

“For this I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice.”

St Augustine: “But when Christ bears witness to the truth, He bears witness to Himself; as He said above, I am the truth. But inasmuch as all men have not faith, He adds, Everyone that is of the truth hears My voice: hears, that is, with the inward ear; obeys My voice, believes Me. Every one that is of the truth, has reference to the grace by which He calls according to His purpose. For as regards the nature in which we are created, since the truth created all, all are of the truth. But it is not all to whom it is given the truth to obey the truth. For had He even said, Everyone one that hears My voice is of the truth, it still would be thought that such were of the truth, because they obeyed the truth But He does not say this, but Everyone that is of the truth hears My voice. A man then is not of the truth, because he hears His voice, but hears His voice because he is of the truth. This grace is conferred upon him by the truth.”

Father Lapide writes that Christ came to bear witness “To evangelical truth, which mainly consists in these things—(1.) In the true knowledge of God, namely, that He is One in Essence, and threefold in Person.

“For every being is true, that is a true and not an imaginary thing, and is true in itself. Wherefore God, who is Very Being (I am that I am) is also truth, and good itself. Because His essential Being is Truth and Goodness. Again, the Son who proceedeth from the Father, as His Word, is Truth Itself, not merely of existence but of mind. Whence S. Augustine says, when Jesus bears witness to the truth, He bears witness to Himself, for He Himself is truth.

“(2.) In the knowledge of the Incarnation; namely, to know that the Son was sent into the world in the flesh, that He might save the world, and that no one can be saved, except by faith in Him (see John xvii. 3).
(3.) In the knowledge of true blessedness: viz., that it consists not in wealth, honours, &c., but in the kingdom of heaven, i.e. in the vision and possession of God. For the sum of Christ’s preaching was, “Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Mat_3:2).

“Christ says that He was born to bear witness to the Truth. (1.) To keep Pilate from wondering that He owned Himself to be a King, for it was but speaking the truth. (2.) That Pilate might learn the innocence and candour of Jesus; for in this truth consists. (3.) To remind him of the justice with which he ought to decide His cause, and that he should not be so moved by the false charges and clamours of the Chief Priests, so as to condemn Him against truth and justice.

“Every one that is of the truth heareth My voice. Those, i.e., who are studious and desirous of the truth; who earnestly and with their whole heart seek the Truth, i.e., the true God and the true Messiah, true happiness and salvation. And who when they have found it embrace it before all things beside. They are opposed to those who are “of contention” (Rom. ii. 8), who, like the philosophers of that time, are ever striving to contend, dispute, and argue. To be, then, “of the truth” is the same as being “of God.” For the Son of God is the Son of the Truth; for God is truth, according to Joh_8:47, “He that is of God heareth God’s words. Ye therefore hear them not, because ye are not of God.” Because, though ye are “of God” by creation, yet ye are not “of Him” by election, faith, and grace. “He commended,” says S. Augustine (in loc.) “that grace which calls according to His purpose.” For he that hath received his testimony (the testimony of the Baptist) “hath set to his seal that God is true” (Joh_3:33). And how true it is, is shown by the statements of enemies. For Josephus (Antiq. xiv. 8) writes, “At that time lived a wise man called Jesus, if indeed it is allowable to call Him a man, for He performed wonderful works, and taught those who willingly received the truth.” (Most scholars consider this an interpolation into Josephus)

“Christ tacitly answers Pilate’s objection, viz. “If Thou bearest witness to the truth, why do the Scribes and Pharisees, who profess the truth, hear Thee not—nay more, persecute Thee even to the death?” He answers, “Because they themselves are not of the truth, but of a lie. For they follow the false opinions of wealth, honours, &c., which the devil suggests to them.” See Joh_8:44.”

38a  what is truth?

Down through the ages this question by Pilate has received a multitude of interpretations; but surely Father Senior is correct when he notes that the question must be seen in relation to Jesus’ words about the truth in the previous verse.  He writes: “But following on Jesus’ words about the meaning of truth and the Gospel’s portrayal of Jesus himself as the Truth sent from God to illumine the world, Pilate’s words are self-condemning.  He joins ranks with the religious leaders; he cannot understand Jesus or his words because he is “not of God” (8:47).”

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St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 18:33-37

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 26, 2011

33 Pilate therefore entered again into the palace, and called Jesus, and said unto Him. Art Thou the King of the Jews?

Having nothing at all to accuse Him of, and none of those crimes to allege against Him, which seem to bring in their train just punishment on the doers of them, and Pilate persisting in inquiring why they had brought Him, they assert that Jesus had sinned against Caesar, in assuming on Himself the dominion which Caesar had acquired over the Jews, and in changing the glory of his kingdom to suit His personal pretensions. Great was the malice which suggested this device, and caused the false accusation to assume this shape; for they knew that Pilate, however reluctant he might be, would take |598 thought for his own safety, and would swiftly and precipitately punish the man against whom any such outcry was raised. For, as the inhabitants of Judaea ever were continually moved to tumults and civil strife, and were easily provoked to revolt, Caesar’s officers were the more vigilant in this respect, and were more careful guardians of order, and inflicted the most summary penalties on men who had this charge brought against them, sometimes groundlessly. The Jews, therefore, make it a charge against Christ, that He reigned over Israel. Therefore justly were they cast out, and the Gentiles brought in, and made subject to the yoke, and put into the Kingdom of Christ. Ask of Me, He says, and I shall give Thee the heathen for Thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for Thy possession. For when the one nation of the Jews provoked Him to wrath, all the nations of the world are given to Christ; and instead of one country, I mean Judaea, the uttermost parts of the earth. For, as Paul saith: Their fall is the riches of the world, and their loss the riches of the Gentiles. Pilate, then, speaks out plainly what he heard the Jews muttering, and bids Jesus answer him, whether He was in truth the King of the Jews. He was full of anxiety, it would appear, and thought Caesar’s rule was menaced, and was, therefore, very desirous to learn the truth, in order to visit what had been done with appropriate retribution, and acquit of blame the office entrusted to him by the Romans.

34 Jesus answered, Sayest thou this of thyself, or did others tell it thee concerning Me?

As no one, He says, has openly brought this charge against Me, whence proceeds your question? There can be no doubt that this trick proceeds from the malice of the Jews, and that they devised this cruel stratagem; for else you would not be, He says, at once judge and accuser. And Christ said this, wishing to bring it to the knowledge of Pilate that nothing that was unseen, |599 and devised, and said in secret, could escape Him; and that, seeing that He was more than man, he might be more reluctant to minister to the cruelty of those who brought Him; and at the same time to teach him that he did very wrong in forcing Him, Who had been convicted of no crime, on the mere word of others to pay the penalty.

35 Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Thine own nation and the chief priests delivered Thee unto me: What hast Thou done?

He now exposes the villainy of the Jews, and almost publishes the multitude of His accusers. It is as though he said: “It does not concern me to know about Thee, for I am not a Jew; but rather befits Thine own nation and kindred, who. it may be, have this knowledge, and so bring Thee to suffer death.” He then accuses himself. For to say, What hast Thou done, implies nothing else but this. The holy Evangelist was very zealous to narrate every detail about the trial of Christ, and among them he tells us the fact that Pilate asked Jesus the question: What hast Thou done? And hereby we may best observe the total absence of charges against Him, and that, as none were brought forward, and Christ our Saviour was convicted of no crime, the sentence of death that went forth against Him was impious and most unjust.

36 Jesus answered, My Kingdom is not of this world: if My Kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is My Kingdom not from hence.

He dispelled the fear Pilate felt as the appointed guardian of Caesar’s kingdom, for he supposed that Christ was meditating insurrection against temporal rule, as the Jews had vainly talked. For they hinted at this when they said: If this Man were not an evildoer, we should not have delivered Him up unto thee; |600 meaning insurrection by the evil they said He was doing. For they affected to be so well-disposed to the Romans, as not even to be able to utter the word revolt. For this cause, then, they said they had brought Him to Pilate, to suffer judgment. Christ, in His reply, denied not that He was a King, for He could not but speak truth; but He clearly proved that He was no enemy to Caesar’s rule, signifying that His Kingdom was not an earthly kingdom, but that He reigned, as God, over heaven and earth, and yet greater things than these.

What proof, then, did He give? and how did He remove this suspicion? He says, that He had never employed any spearmen or warriors, and had never had with Him any men at all resolved on resistance; not merely in order to prevent His losing His Kingdom, but not even, that He might escape from the imminent danger cast upon Him by the hand of the Jews; for it did not proceed from their ruler himself, namely, Caesar. When, then, He had shown the groundlessness of this outcry by so clear a proof, Pilate perceived that the presumptuous attempt against Christ was without excuse. Yet, without any compulsion, and when there was nothing to incite him to that consequence, he complied with the pleasure of the Jews, to the perdition of his own soul, and shared with them the guilt of having put Christ to death. Christ, indeed, when He said that His Kingdom was a supernatural kingdom, not only freed Pilate from all alarm, and dispelled his suspicions about an insurrection, but induced him also to have an exalted opinion of Him, and by His reply in some sort commenced to instruct him.

37 Pilate therefore said unto Him, Art Thou a king then?

He makes use of Christ’s truth-speaking to charge Him withal. When he heard Him say: My Kingdom is not from hence, he was indeed quit of his fear of an insurrection; but he still compels Him to openly profess this thing, and defines as a charge His mere assertion |601 that He had a kingdom, though He asserted that it was not of this world. He drives Jesus, as it were, to make this profession; and says, Thou hast confessed already that Thou art a King.

37, 38 Jesus answered him, Thou sayest that I am a King. To this end have I been born, and to this end am I come into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth My voice. Pilate saith unto Him, What is truth?

He does not deny the glory of His Kingdom, nor leave it to the voice of Pilate only to affirm it, for as God He is King, whether man so will, or no; but He once more showed the power of the truth which impelled Pilate, though reluctant, to declare the glory of Him Who was on His trial; for, He says: Thou hast said, that I am a King. For this cause was I born, He says, and came into this world when I became Man, that I should bear witness unto the truth; that is, that He might take lying out of the world, and, having subdued the devil, who gained his way by guile, He might show truth triumphant over the universe; truth—-that is, that nature that is truly sovereign by nature, which has not by craft acquired the ability to hold rule and dominion over heaven and earth, and, in a word, everything that is brought into being; nor has this been added unto it from without, but it is seen to be essentially and naturally inherent. In order, too, that He might show that Pilate’s dulness of apprehension arose from his stubborn heart, and his reluctance to admit the truth, Christ fitly adds the word: Everyone that is of the truth heareth My voice. For the word of truth gains a ready acceptance from those who have already learnt and love it; but with others it is not so. Yea, the Prophet Isaiah said to some: If ye will not believe, neither shall ye understand. Pilate showed at once the truth of this, when he said: What is truth? For, just as those whose sight is injured, and who have wholly |602 lost the use of their eyes, have their sense of colour entirely annihilated, so as not to note when gold is brought before them, or a shining and precious stone shown them, nay, even the very light of the sun’s rays excites in them no wonder, as they have no perception thereof, and can gain no profit from any such thing; so to men whose minds are warped, truth seems a foul and ugly thing, although it instils into the minds of those who behold it its spiritual and Divine radiancy.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Devotional Resources, fathers of the church, Latin Mass Notes, liturgy, Notes on the Gospel of John, Notes on the Lectionary, Quotes, Scripture, SERMONS | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Two of the Most Ridiculous Things I’ve Ever Seen!

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 23, 2011

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These two videos show Moon Puppies at their finest.

 

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Sunday, October 23: Resources for Sunday Mass (Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms)

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 22, 2011

This post contains resources for both Ordinary and Extraordinary Forms of the Roman Rite. The readings in the two forms differ. Some links below are listed as Pending and will be made available as soon as possible. Updates, if any, will be marked UPDATE.

ORDINARY FORM
THIRTIETH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Sunday Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 Thess 1:5c-10. This post includes commentary on verse 2-10.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thess 5c-10. This post includes commentary on verses 1-10.

My Notes on 1 Thess 1:5c-10 for Sunday Mass, October 23. This post is actually on verses 2-10.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 18 (17). Latin and English side by side.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matt 22:34-40 for Sunday Mass, October 23.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matt 22:34-40 for Sunday Mass, October 23.

Sunday Gospel Scripture Study. Video. Looks at the Gospel reading in some detail.

UPDATE: Sacred Page Podcast. Catholic biblical scholar Michael Barber uses his radio program to talk about today’s Gospel.

WORD SUNDAY:

  • MP3 PODCAST In this week’s audio podcast, we discuss the subject of love in action. Love isn’t really love until it is lived out.
  • FIRST READING What do we owe our neighbor? We can measure that answer when we assume our neighbor is needy. This was the standard found in the book of Exodus. We are to treat the poor and the stranger with compassion. We are to treat our peers in need as equals. In other words, we are to treat everyone as children of God.
  • PSALM Psalm 96 was a hymn of praise that extended beyond the parochial view of the Temple in Jerusalem. This was a song that encouraged praise from all people to the God of all.
  • SECOND READING The early Christian community at Thessalonika had a sterling reputation of faithfulness. Unlike the churches at Corinth or Galicia, the Thessalonians did not suffer from heresy or cliques. They were focused. St. Paul recognized that their reputation had an evangelical value. How we conduct ourselves, especially with others, can help spread the Good News.
  • GOSPEL By itself, the Great Commandment was not original with Jesus. Jews sought a hierarchy of commands from the Law, and the first command would interpret the others. The combination of Deuteronomy 6:5 (“Love the Lord…”) and Leviticus (“Love your neighbor…”) predated Jesus. The question of Pharisees meant to test the orthodoxy of Jesus. However, Jesus gave a traditional answer, but his application of these verses were revolutionary. Love of neighbor meant concern for the needy, the outcast, and, above all, the sinner.
  • CHILDREN’S READINGS In the story for the first reading, two sisters encounter a homeless man. One makes a comment, then shrugs. The other creates a plan to help the homeless; this sister lived out the command found in the book of Exodus. In the story for the gospel, Theo demanded action from his teams on their football team. “Show me” was his cry. When Jesus gave us the commands to love God above all and love our neighbors as ourselves, he, too, wanted action. He wanted us to show others what the word “love” really meant.
  • CATECHISM LINK  The Catechism Link explores the Great Commandment, love for God and love of neighbor.
  • FAMILY ACTIVITY To teach your family the meaning of the “love” commandments, take some time away from the normal activities of the weekend. Get away to enjoy nature or the season. Take time to enjoy each other’s company. This is a way to put love in action.

Bible Workshop.  Includes a few relevant links, a guide for reading, a comparison of the readings, homily suggestions.

Gospel Reading with Meditation.

Historical Cultural Context. The Gospel in light of first century Mediterranean culture.

Thoughts From the Early Church. Excerpt from a Sermon by St Augustine.

Scripture in depth.

Catholic Matters. The readings followed by brief explanations.

Parish Bible StudyPdf document. Notes on the readings.

Lector NotesBrief historical and theological overview of the readings. Can be printed out, copied and used for a bulletin insert.

Dr. Scott Hahn Podcast.  Brief audio. Does a good job of highlighting the major theme(s) of the readings. Text available.

Pending. Father Robert Barron Homily Podcast. Audio by a well known and respected speaker and theologian.

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
NINETEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

Online Romans Missal. Latin and English side by side.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Ephesians 4:23-28.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matt 22:1-14.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matt 22:1-14.

Sunday Gospel Scripture Study. Video. This reading was used for the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time in the Ordinary Form.

Devout Instruction on the Epistle and Gospel.

Homily on the Epistle. Bishop Bonomelli.

Homily on the Gospel. Bishop Bonomelli.

Spiritual Renovation. Homily on the Epistle by Father Johann Evangelist Zollner.

The Call of the Gentiles. Homily on the Gospel by Father Zollner.

Dogmatic Homily on the Small Number of the Elect. Father Zollner.

Liturgical Homily on the Anniversary of the Dedication of a Church. Father Zollner.

Symbolic Homily on the Wedding Garment. Father Zollner.

Moral Homily on the Signs of Election and Reprobation. Father Zollner.

Moral Homily on the Reverence Due to Clergy. Father Zollner.

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