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The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for February 1st, 2014

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:14-18

Posted by Dim Bulb on February 1, 2014

This post includes the bishop’s brief analysis of Hebrews chapter 2 followed by the notes on today’s reading. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the scripture he is commenting on. Text in red, if any, are my additions.

ANALYSIS OF HEBREWS CHAPTER 2

In this chapter, the Apostle infers, from the superior excellence of Christ above the angels, he demonstrated in the preceding, the New Law, of which he was the promulgator, was to be observed with greater diligence than was required in the observance of the Old (1–4). Then, reverting to the question of the superiority of Christ over the angels, he shows, that to him, and not to them, was subjected the world to come; and although we do not see all things subjected to him; still, the prophecy of David regarding him, a part of which is already fulfilled, shall ultimately receive its full accomplishment (4–9).

As the passion of Christ was a source of scandal to the Jews, on this account, the Apostle points out from several reasons, the congruity of his suffering, and vindicates the economy of redemption (10–15). Finally, he shows how perfectly our blessed Saviour possessed the qualities required in one, who was to undertake the redemption of mankind (17, 18).

14 Therefore because the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself in like manner hath been partaker of the same: that, through death, he might destroy him who had the empire of death, that is to say, the devil:

Since, then, the children of Christ have partaken of a passible nature, he also assumed the same, in order that, by his death, he might destroy the power of the devil, by depriving him of that empire of death, which he had abased, by inflicting it on Christ himself, who was undeserving of it, being wholly innocent.

Since the children of Christ have a passible nature (which is meant by “flesh” and “blood”), so, in like manner, he assumed the nature of “these children, whom God gave him” (John, 17:15), for the purpose of destroying the power of the devil (see Paraphrase), according to which interpretation, the words have the same meaning as chap. 8:3, to the Romans. They may also mean, that he destroyed the power of the devil, by obtaining for men, through his passion and death, the means of escaping that second and eternal death, in which the empire of the devil principally consisted.

15 And might deliver them, who through the fear of death were all their lifetime subject to servitude.

And might ransom and emancipate those who, owing to the great dread and terror they had of death, were, during their lifetime, kept in servitude, or the servile fear of its approach.

According to the meaning in the Paraphrase, the Apostle says, that by his death and subsequent resurrection, Christ showed men, that death was a mere sleep, and not so formidable, owing to his grace, as they were apt to imagine; for, the terror of its approach kept them in servile fear, during the entire course of their lives. The words may also mean, that he rescued men from the servitude of the Mosaic law, which restrained them within the bounds of duty only by the fear of death, which it proposed in cases of weightier transgressions.

16 For nowhere doth he take hold of the angels: but of the seed of Abraham he taketh hold.

For, in truth, it was not the angels, who were by nature immortal, that he came to rescue, but mortal men of the seed of Abraham, the spiritual Father of the redeemed generation.

According to the interpretation in Paraphrase, this verse is connected with verse 15: he rescued “those who were through fear of death all their lifetime,” &c.; for, it was not the angels, who, being immortal, were not afraid of death, and required not to be ransomed, that he grasped and dragged forth from their servitude, and asserted into liberty. The Greek word for “take hold of,” επιλαμβανεται, means, to seize hold of, and drag back, one flying from us. This is the interpretation of the verse that accords best with the following. Others connect this verse with verse 14, thus: “he also in like manner hath been partaker of the same” … for it was not the angelic nature he assumed to an hypostatic union, but human nature of the seed of Abraham. This is the interpretation more commonly given of this verse. The interpretation adopted in the Paraphrase seems, however, preferable; both because it is the natural meaning of the verb, “take hold of,” and because it accords better with the following verse; moreover, the latter interpretation would appear a useless repetition of the words—verse 15—“he also in like manner hath been partaker of the same,” which clearly express that he assumed human nature, the nature of his “children.”

17 Wherefore, it behoved him in all things to be made like unto his brethren, that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest before God, that he might be a propitiation for the sins of the people.

Hence, as Christ came to redeem, not angels, but mankind, and came to sanctify them, as high priest, it was meet he should become like them, who in his assumed nature, were his brethren, in all their infirmities not unbecoming his dignity, infirm, mortal, and passible, in order that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in the affairs appertaining to God, his fidelity as a high priest consisting in expiating for our sins, and propitiating God for them.

As Christ, then, came to redeem and sanctify mankind; it was meet that he should become like them in all their infirmities, not unsuited to his dignity and infinite sanctity, i.e., become weak, passible, mortal; this assimilation in these respects being necessary, in order that he might he adorned with the two great qualities of a high priest, viz., fidelity, consisting in his satisfying for sin, of which he would be incapable, if he had not a passible nature;

18 For in that wherein he himself hath suffered and been tempted he is able to succour them also that are tempted.

And his mercy in this, that by suffering and being tempted himself, he becomes more fit and inclined to carry aid, and show compassion to those who are themselves tempted and afflicted.

And mercy, which he is the better fitted to exercise, by having suffered himself; for, the circumstance of his own possibility, and of his experimentally becoming acquainted with the miseries of his people, and of his participation in them, will serve to render the pontiff who sanctifies, more apt to compassionate, and will add energy and force (“he is able”) to his exertions for their relief.

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This Week’s Commentaries: Sunday, February 2–Sunday, February 9, 2014

Posted by Dim Bulb on February 1, 2014

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2014
FEAST OF THE PRESENTATION OF THE LORD

RESOURCES FOR TODAY’S MASS.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2014
MONDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 3.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 3.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 3.

Pseudo-Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 3.

My Notes on Psalm 3.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 5:1-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 5:1-20.

Catholic Scripture Manual Notes on Mark 5:1-20.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2014
TUESDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 86.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 86.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 86.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 5:21-43.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 5:21-43.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 5:21-43.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2014
MEMORIAL OF ST AGATHA, VIRGIN AND MARTYR

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 32.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 32.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 32.

St John Fisher’s Homiletic Commentary on Psalm 32. Begins near bottom of page.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:1-6.

My Notes on Mark 6:1-6.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 6:1-6.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014
MEMORIAL OF ST PAUL MIKI AND COMPANIONS, MARTYRS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Pending (maybe): My Notes on 1 Kings 2:1-4, 10-12.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on 1 Chronicles 29:10-12. On 10-13.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:7-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:7-13.

Pending: Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 6:7-13.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2014
FRIDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Sirach 47:2-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 18.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 18.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 18.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 18.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:14-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:14-29.

Pending: Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 6:14-29.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2014
SATURDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Kings 3:4-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

Psallam Domino on Psalm 119:9-16.

My Notes on Psalm 119:9-14.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:30-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:30-34.

Pending: Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 6:30-34.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014
FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

COMMENTARIES AND RESOURCES FOR TODAY’S MASS.

Next Week’s Commentaries and Posts.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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