The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for February 8th, 2014

This Week’s Posts: Sunday, February 9-Sunday, February 16, 2014

Posted by Dim Bulb on February 8, 2014

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2014
FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

COMMENTARIES AND RESOURCES FOR TODAY’S MASS.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2014
MEMORIAL OF ST SCHOLASTICA, VIRGIN

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Kings 8:1-7, 9-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 132.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 132.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 132.

Pseudo-St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 132.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:53-56.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 6:53-56.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:53-56.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014
TUESDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Kings 8:22-23, 27-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 84.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 84.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 84.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:1-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:1-13.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2014
WEDNESDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Some thoughts on Today’s Readings (1 Kings 10:1-10, Ps 37, Mk 7:14-23).

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 37.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 37.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:14-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:14-23.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014
THURSDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Kings 11:4-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:24-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:24-30.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2014
MEMORIAL OF ST CYRIL, MONK, AND ST METHODIUS, BISHOP

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Kings 11:29-32, 12:19.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 81.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 81.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 81.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:31-37.

St Ambrose on Mark 7:31-37. A catechetical instruction on baptism.

Homily Notes on Mark 7:31-37 by St Thomas Aquinas.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on Mark 7:31-37.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2014
SATURDAY OF THE FIFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Kings 12:26-32, 13:33-34.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 106:19-23.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 8:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 8:1-10.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014
SIXTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

COMMENTARIES AND RESOURCES FOR TODAY’S MASS.

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Father Rickaby’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 2:1-5

Posted by Dim Bulb on February 8, 2014

Text in red are my additions.

1 Cor 2:1 AND I, brethren, when I came to you, came not in loftiness of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of Christ.

It seems likely that the Apostle came from Athens to Corinth much mortified and abashed; and that his addresses to the Corinthians were delivered in a tone and style unusually subdued and simple, like the speech of a man heavy with recent disappointment and apprehensive of further failure. We must beware therefore how we take these verses to indicate St. Paul’s normal manner of preaching. By nature and by education, as his writings show, the Apostle of the Gentiles must have been a great orator, subject doubtless to those fits of depression which frequently beset genius. Cf. note on Gal. 4:13.

Here is what Father Rickaby wrote in Galatians 4:13~Through infirmity of the flesh I preached the gospel to you heretofore, He preached then  δι ασθενειαν της σαρκος (di astheneian tes sarkos), per infirmitatem carnis is how it is rendered in the Vulgate, or as St. Jerome rightly has it, propter infirmitatem carnis, i.e. by reason of infirmity of the flesh, not in infirmity, which would be δι ἀσθένεις (di astheneias), a distinction which is maintained no less in Hellenistic than in classical Greek, as examination of the uses of διά (“through”) in the Old and New Testament proves. The plain meaning of the words then is that it was some illness, not mentioned by St. Luke, that detained St. Paul in his first passage through Galatia, and led to his preaching where he would otherwise have simply traveled through to what seemed more promising ground. See the passage, Acts 16:6.

1 Cor 2:2 For I judged not myself to know anything among you, but Jesus Christ: and him crucified.

The cross is honourable in our eyes; but in the first century of the Church it required considerable enthusiasm in a preacher of the gospel, to avow and set in a strong light the fact that his Master and his God had recently died the death of a slave.

1 Cor 2:3 And I was with you in weakness and in fear and in much trembling.
1 Cor 2:4 And my speech and my preaching was not in the persuasive words of human wisdom. but in shewing of the Spirit and power:

In weakness. The phrase εν ασθενεια (en astheneia) may mean in lowly estate, and allude to his working as a tent-maker, Acts 18:3.

In fear and in much trembling. “What sayest thou? did Paul actually fear dangers? Yes, he did fear and was very much afraid: for he was human, though he was Paul. This is no charge against Paul, but a weakness of nature, and a commendation of his resolve, in that, for all his fear of death and stripes, he did nothing unseemly through that fear. They who say that he had no fear of stripes, not only do not elevate his character, but detract much from his praises. For if he had no fear, what constancy or what philosophy was there in his braving dangers? It is for this that I admire him, that fearing, aye even trembling as he did at dangers, he everywhere ran his race victoriously” (St. John Chrysostom).

If then at Corinth (a0 the believers were generally mean and illiterate people (1 Cor 1:26); (b) the preacher and founder of the church there was a man who made a poor show to human eyes (1 Cor 2:3, 4); (c) the truth preached and believed in was Christ crucified, to human intelligence a scandal and a folly (1 Cor 1:23; 2:2); then Christianity at Corinth was of no human creation; it was created by the power and inward motion of the Holy Ghost, working in the hearts of them that believed. The final conclusion is that the Corinthians had no matter for self-glorification, no matter for despising their neighbour, no matter for contention and strife, in any gift that Christianity had brought to them.

1 Cor 2:5 That your faith might not stand on the wisdom of men, but on the power of God.

The power of God shone forth by the miraculous gifts enumerated in 1 Cor 12.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Notes on 1 Corinthians, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 2:1-5

Posted by Dim Bulb on February 8, 2014

This post opens with a brief analysis of 1 Corinthians 2 followed by notes on verses 1-5. Text in purple represents Fr. MacEvilly’s paraphrasing of the scripture he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS OF 1 CORINTHIANS CHAPTER 2

In this chapter, the Apostle shows how far he himself acted in accordance with the economy of God in excluding human wisdom in the work of redemption, when he came to preach the gospel to the Corinthians. His preaching was recommended neither by the graces of oratory, nor by the powers of reasoning, because he wished that their faith should rest on its proper basis, viz., the powerful grace of God (verses 1–5). He next asserts his own dignity, and says that, although he rejected all the aids derived from human wisdom in preaching the gospel among the Corinthians; still, he discoursed on another and more exalted kind of wisdom, on befitting occasions—a wisdom far different from that of men or demons (6)—a wisdom concealed from the world in all past ages, and now revealed for our temporal and eternal glory (7)—a wisdom unknown to the devils (8); and according to, the prophecy of Isaias, fully comprehended by God alone (9). But, though hidden and mysterious, it was made known to the Apostle by the revelation of God’s spirit, who is intimately acquainted with the divine secrets; and who alone knows the hidden thoughts of the divine mind (10, 11). This was the spirit from whom the Apostle received a knowledge of the general benefits and gifts conferred through Christ on his Church, of which gifts he treats in proper circumstances in a manner suited to the capacity and requirements of his hearers; he treats of the exalted truths of faith before those only, who are far advanced in Christian knowledge (12–13). Because it would be useless to treat of them before persons not sufficiently versed in the principles of faith. To such men, truths of this kind would appear folly. Hence, he declined proposing them to the Corinthians (14, 15). He should not be judged or undervalued for this line of conduct; for, to judge him, acting in this way, would be to judge and instruct God himself (16).

1 Cor 2:1 AND I, brethren, when I came to you, came not in loftiness of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of Christ.

(Since, then, God has been pleased to confound human wisdom in the work of redemption), I, therefore, when amongst you, preaching the gospel of Christ, did not employ the elegant diction of the orator, nor the fine-drawn conclusions and reasonings of the philosopher.

. The Apostle applies now to his own case, what he said in the preceding chapter, in general, regarding the decree of God, “to save the believers by the folly of preaching,” (1:21). It was in accordance with the will of God in this respect, that he preached “the testimony,” or “gospel of Christ,” (in the Greek, τοῦ θεοῦ, of God), among them, in a plain, simple style, and “not in the loftiness of speech or of wisdom,” i.e., without employing the splendid diction of the orator, or the wisdom of the philosopher, so attractive at the time to the Corinthians.

1 Cor 2:2 For I judged not myself to know anything among you, but Jesus Christ: and him crucified.

For, I judged it expedient, and, therefore, I resolved, to pretend to no further knowledge amongst you, except as regarded the principal mysteries of Christ, and especially those of his death and crucifixion.

He conducted himself amongst them, as if he knew only “Christ crucified.” Not that his preaching was confined to this article merely; for, it is likely, he explained to them all the necessary articles of faith, as well as some duties of Christian morality; but that he merely propounded, in a simple, catechetical way, the rudiments of Christian faith, founded on the article of Christ’s crucifixion; reserving for more befitting circumstances the more elevated doctrines of faith, “the wisdom in a mystery,” (verse 7). Of what avail will all other knowledge be to us, if we neglect this all necessary knowledge “of Christ crucified?” From this sacred fountain, the saints derived more useful knowledge than they could find in the most learned books. Who can seriously meditate on this prodigy of justice and mystery of mercy, the dead body of a God hanging on a cross, and not be moved to hate sin and forcibly drawn to love God? It is because men never seriously meditate on the passion of Christ. It is because they never seriously reflect on, who it is that suffers these ignominious tortures. Why, is it He thus suffers? It is because they never attend to the cause, the circumstances, the consequences of His sufferings, that their callous hearts are so insensible to this excessive charity of God, which should press them—charitas Christi urget nos.—2 Cor. 5:14.

1 Cor 2:3 And I was with you in weakness and in fear and in much trembling.

And when amongst you, I was in a state of great weakness, both as regards mental anxiety and bodily uneasiness;

“In weakness,” is understood by some to refer to bodily distempers and sickness; by others, to the lowliness of his condition, being obliged to earn his subsistence by working at a trade. “And in fear and in much trembling.” The former refers to his mental anxiety; the latter, to bodily uneasiness. This was probably occasioned by his fears of persecution from the Jews. Hence, he required a vision from God to comfort him.—(Acts, 18:12). According to others, it arose from the apprehension that he might, either by word or deed, give offence, and obstruct the cause of the gospel. He wishes to convey to us in this verse, that not only was his language simple, but also that his personal appearance was lowly.

1 Cor 2:4 And my speech and my preaching was not in the persuasive words of human wisdom. but in shewing of the Spirit and power:

And my private conversation, and my public preaching were recommended neither by the eloquence of the orator, nor by the reasoning of the philosopher; their only recommendation were the zeal inspired by the Holy Ghost, with which they were delivered, and the miracles, with which they were accompanied.

“And my speech,” i.e., private conversation, “and my preaching,” in public, “was not in the persuasive words of human wisdom,” i.e., recommended by the graces of oratory, or the reasonings of philosophy, which men are apt to employ when they endeavour to persuade others, and which, with the haughty Corinthians, especially, would be a most powerful instrument of persuasion—“but in the shewing of the spirit and of power,” are thus interpreted by some, “but in the shewing of the power of the Holy Ghost.” It may, however, be better to understand the words “spirit and power” separately; the former referring to the zeal and energy with which the Apostle discoursed both publicly and privately on the truths of faith—a zeal and fire which displayed the interior workings of the Holy Ghost—and the latter, to the miracles which he wrought in confirmation of the truth of his doctrine.

1 Cor 2:5 That your faith might not stand on the wisdom of men, but on the power of God.

And I pursued this line of conduct in order that your faith might be referred’ to its proper cause only, viz., the power of God (which is particularly displayed in bringing about prodigies of strength by means so weak and inadequate).

We have disregarded the adventitious aid of human wisdom and eloquence, in order that “your faith,” your conversion to Christ might not be ascribed to human wisdom, but to the powerful grace of God; so that it should appear to be, not a human, but, as it is in reality, a divine work.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Christ, Notes on 1 Corinthians, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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