The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for November, 2014

Commentaries for the Fourth Week of Advent Through Epiphany

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 30, 2014

FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT
We are in Year A

Year A Commentaries.

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings. Note: there are two possible 1st readings to choose from.

Today’s Divine Office.

1st reading: Navarre Bible Commentary on Song of Songs 2:8-14.

Alt. 1st Reading: Navarre Bible Commentary on Zephaniah 3:14-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 33.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 33.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 33.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:39-45.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:39-45.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 1:39-45.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 1:39-45.

TUESDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Samuel 1:24-28.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial (1 Samuel 2:1, 4-8). On 1-10.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary Luke 1:46-56.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Luke 1:46-56.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:46-56.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:46-56.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s Gospel Luke 1:46-56.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Malachi 3:1-4, 23-24.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Malachi 3:1-4, 23-24.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 25.

Fatheer Berry’s Introduction to Psalm 25.

St Augustine on Psalm 25.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 25.

Lection Divina Notes on Psalm 25.

Some Rambling on Psalm 25. “Off the top of my head” reflections on St John the Baptist in relation to today’s first reading (the Baptist is the focal point of both the first and Gospel readings today).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:57-66.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:57-66.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 1:57-66.

THURSDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF ADVENT

Please Note: Resources for the Christmas Vigil are listed below under Christmas day.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:1-5a, 8b-12, 14a, 16.

St Augustine on 2 Samuel 7:4-5a, 12-14a, 16 and Psalm 89.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:67-79.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Luke 1:67-79.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:67-79.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 1:67-79.

DECEMBER 25
SOLEMNITY OF THE NATIVITY OF THE LORD

CHRISTMAS

Vigil Mass for the Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord (Dec 24).

Mass During the Night: The Nativity of the Lord (Midnight Mass).

Mass at Dawn: The Nativity of the Lord.

Mass During the Day: The Nativity of the Lord.

DECEMBER 26
FEAST OF ST STEPHEN THE FIRST MARTYR

Commentaries for the Feast of St Stephen.

DECEMBER 27
FEAST OF THE HOLY FAMILY, JESUS, MARY AND JOSEPH
NOTE: Dec. 27 is usually the Feast of St John the Evangelist, however, because the 27th falls on a Sunday this year it is superseded by the Feast of the Holy Family which is always celebrated on the Sunday following Christmas. Nonetheless I have provided commentaries for that feast as well (last link).

Corrected/Updated Commentaries for the Feast of the Holy Family. The Lectionary allows several alternate readings and I have not yet added commentaries to these.

Commentaries for the Feast of St John the Apostle.

DECEMBER 28
FEAST OF THE HOLY INNOCENTS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

St Augustine’s Homily on 1 John 1:5-2:2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 1:5-2:2.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 1:5-2:2.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 124.

Pope Benedict XVI on Psalm 124.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 2:13-18.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 2:13-18. On 13-23.

My Notes on Matthew 2:13-18.

DECEMBER 29
THE FIFTH DAY IN THE OCTAVE OF CHRISTMAS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

St Augustine on 1 John 2:3-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’ Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:22-35.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:22-35.

DECEMBER 30
THE SIXTH DAY IN THE OCTAVE OF CHRISTMAS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

St Augustine on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:36-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:36-40.

DECEMBER 31
THE SEVENTH DAY IN THE OCTAVE OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Cornelius a Lapdie’s Commentary on 1 John 2:18-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:18-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:1-18.

Fathers Nolan and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:1-18.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:1-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:1-18.

SERMONS FOR THE NEW YEAR’S EVE/NEW YEARS DAY.

JANUARY 1
THE OCTAVE DAY OF CHRISTMAS
SOLEMNITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY, MOTHER OF GOD

Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, The Mother of God (Octave of Christmas).

JANUARY 2
MEMORIAL OF SAINT BASIL THE GREAT AND SAINT GREGORY NANZIANZEN, BISHOPS AND DOCTORS OF THE CHURCH

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Father MacIntryre’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:19-28.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 1:19-28. Scroll down and read lectures 12 & 13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:19-28.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on John 1:19-28. Prayer and reflection on the Gospel in the Carmelite tradition.

THE EPIPHANY OF THE LORD

Commentaries for the Epiphany of the Lord.

Next Week’s Posts.

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Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Third Week of Advent

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 30, 2014

SUNDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT.
SPECIAL NOTE: Depending on when Advent has started, the normal readings (daily, not Sunday) for the Third Week of Advent may be superseded by the readings specially chosen for December 17-24.  When a Sunday falls during this time period its readings are not superseded. Links have been provided for this contingency.

Year A Commentaries. The time of the Messiah was to be marked by integral healing and salvation (1st reading). In His person and mission, heralded by the Baptist, our Lord manifested and communicated such healing and salvation (gospel). We are called upon to wait patiently for the fullness of the Messianic age (2nd reading), as we glorify the works of God and look forward to the final coming of the Lord (Ps).

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

MONDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18 the normal readings are omitted and take from the readings for that date (see the first link).

If this day falls on Dec. 17 or 18. Commentaries for December 17-24.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Numbers 24:2-7, 15-17a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Numbers 24:2-7, 15-17a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 25.

Father Berry’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 25.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 25.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 25.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 25.

My Notes on Psalm 25:4-5, 8-9.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 21:23-27.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 21:23-27.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 21:23-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 21:23-27.

TUESDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18 the normal readings are omitted and take from the readings for that date (see the first link).
NOTE: This year this day falls on Dec 12, the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The second link is to commentaries for that feast. The links that follow are commentaries for the normal Advent weekday readings.

If this day falls on Dec. 17-18. Commentaries for December 17-24.

2017. Commentaries for the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

Today’s Mass Readings.

My Notes on Zephaniah 3:1-2, 9-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Zephaniah 3:1-2, 9-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 21:28-32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 21:28-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 21:28-32.

WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18 the normal readings are omitted and take from the readings for that date (see the first link).

If this day falls on Dec. 17-18. Commentaries for December 17-24.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 45:6c-8, 18, 21c-25.

My Notes on Isaiah 45:6c-8, 18, 21c-25. Only partially complete, will update.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 85.

My Notes on Psalm 85.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 7:18-23.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 7:18-23. Actually, this homily begins with verse 17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 7:18-23.

THURSDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18 the normal readings are omitted and take from the readings for that date (see the first link).

If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18. Commentaries for December 17-24.

My Notes on Isaiah 54:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 54:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 30.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 30.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 30.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 30.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 30.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 7:24-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 7:24-30.

FRIDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
If this day falls on Dec 17 or 18 the normal readings are omitted and take from the readings for that date (see the first link).

If this day falls on Dec. 17-18. Commentaries for December 17-24.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 56:1-3, 6-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 67.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 67.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 67.

Lectio Divina Commentary on Psalm 67.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 5:33-36.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on John 5:33-36. On 31-47.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 5:33-36.

SATURDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT
Saturday of the third week of Advent always falls during the period of Dec-17-24. Go to the link below and click on the appropriate date.

Commentaries for December 17-24.

 

FOURTH SUNDAY OF ADVENT

Year A Commentaries. Our Lord came in fulfillment of prophecy (1st, 2nd, Gosp. readings) and became “Immanuel,” “God with us” ( 1st, Gosp.) through his resurrection from the dead (2nd reading; see also Mt 28:19-20). We pray that our Lord, “the King of glory,” will come to be with us (Ps; see also Jn 14:2-3, 17:24).

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

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Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:5-25

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 30, 2014

Ver 5. There was in the days of Herod, the king of Judea, a certain priest named Zacharias, of the course of Abia: and his wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elizabeth.6. And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless.7. And they had no child, because that Elizabeth was barren, and they both were now well stricken in years.

CHRYS; St. Luke commences the history of his Gospel with Zacharias and the birth of John; relating one marvelous event before another, the less before the greater. For since a virgin was about to become a mother, it had been fore-ordained by grace that the old should previously conceive. He fixes the time, when he says, In the days of Herod, and in the following words adds his rank, king of Judea. There was another Herod, who killed John; he was tetrarch, whereas this one was king.

THEOPHYL; Now the time of Herod, i. c. of a foreign king, bears witness to our Lord’s coming, for it had been foretold, The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come. For from the time that our fathers came out of Egypt, they were governed by judges of their own nation, until the Prophet Samuel; and then by kings, until the carrying away to Babylon. But after the return from Babylon, the chief power was in the hands of priests, until the time of Hyrcanus, who was both king and high priest. He was slain by Herod, after which the government of the kingdom was delivered over by the command of Augustus Caesar to this same Herod, a foreigner, in whose thirty-first year, according to the prophecy we have mentioned, Shiloh came.

AMBROSE; Divine Scripture teaches us with respect to those whom we commemorate, that not only the characters of the men themselves, but of their parents also, ought to be praised, that they might be distinguished by an inheritance, as it were, handed down to them of unspotted purity. Now not only from his parents, but also from his ancestors, St. John derives his illustrious descent, a descent not exalted by secular power, but venerable from its sanctity. Complete then is that praise which comprehends birth, character, office, actions, and judgments.

The office was that of the Priesthood, as it is said, A certain Priest of the name of Zacharias.

THEOPHYL; For John was allotted a Priestly tribe, that he might with the more authority herald forth a change of priesthood.

AMBROSE; His birth is implied in the mention made of his ancestors. Of the course of Abia, i.e. of high rank among the noblest families.

THEOPHYL; There were Princes of the Sanctuary or High Priests, both of the sons of Eleazar and the sons of Thamar, whose courses according to their respective services when they entered into the House of God David divided into twenty-four lots, of which the family of Abia (from which Zacharias was descended) obtained the eighth lot. But it was not without meaning that the first preacher of the new covenant was born with the rights of the eighth lot; because as the old Covenant is often expressed by the seventh number on account of the Sabbath, so frequently is the new Covenant by the eighth, because of the sacrament of our Lord’s or our resurrection.

THEOPHYL; Wishing to show also that John was legally of Priestly descent, Luke adds, And his wife was of the daughters of Aaron, and her name was Elisabeth, for it was not permitted to the Jews to take a wife from any other tribe but their own. Elisabeth by interpretation signifies “rest,” Zacharias “the remembrance of the land.”

THEOPHYL; John was born of just parents, that so he might the more boldly give precepts of justice to the people, which he had not learnt as novelties, but had received by right of inheritance from his ancestors. Hence it follows, And they were both just before God.

AMBROSE; Here their whole character is comprehended in their justice, but it is well said before God, for a man by affecting a popular good-will might seem just to me, but not be just before God, if that justice instead of springing from simpleness of heart, was a mere presence carried on by flattery. Perfect then is the praise, “that a man is just before God;” for he only is perfect who is approved by Him who cannot be deceived. St. Luke comprehends the action in the commandment, the doing justice in the justification. Hence it follows, walking in all the commandments and justifications of the Lord. For when we obey the command of heaven we walk in the commandments of the Lord, when we observe justice we seem to possess the justification of the Lord. But to be “blameless” we must “provide things honest”, not only before God, but also before men; there is no blame when both motive and action are alike good, but a too austere righteousness often provokes censure. A righteous act may also be done unrighteously, as when a man out of ostentation gives largely to the poor, which is not without just cause of blame. It follows, And they had no son, because Elizabeth was barren.

CHRYS; Not only Elisabeth, but the wives of the Patriarchs also, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel, were barren, which was counted a disgrace among the ancients. Not that their barrenness was the effect of sin, since all were just and virtuous, but ordained rather for our benefit, that when you saw a virgin giving birth to the Lord, you might not be faithless, or perplexing your mind with respect to the womb of the barren

THEOPHYL; And that you might learn that the law of God seeks not a bodily increase of sons but a spiritual, both were far advanced, not only in the body but in the Spirit, “making ascents in their heart,” having their life as the day not as the night, and walking honestly as in the day.

Ver 8. And it came to pass, that while he executed the Priest’s office before God in the order of his course,9. According to the custom of the Priest’s office, his lot was to burn incense when he went into the temple of the Lord.10. And the whole multitude of the people were praying without at the time of incense.

THEOPHYL; The Lord appointed by the hand of Moses one High Priest, at whose death another was to succeed in due order. This was observed until the time of David, who by the command of the Lord increased the number of the Priests; and so at this time Zacharias is said to have been performing his Priest’s office in the order of his course, as it follows: But it came to pass, when Zacharias was performing the Priest’s office in the order of his course before God, according to the custom of the Priesthood, his lot was, &c.

AMBROSE; Zacharias seems here to be designated High Priest, because into the second tabernacle went the High Priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself and the sins of the people.

THEOPHYL; It was not by a new lot that he was chosen when the incense was to be burnt, but by the old lot, whereby according to the order of his Priesthood he succeeded in the course of Abia.

It follows, And all the multitude of the people, &c. Incense was ordered to be carried into the Holy of Holies by the High Priest, the whole people waiting without the temple. It was to be on the tenth day of the seventh month, and this day was to be called the day of expiation or propitiation, the mystery of which day the Apostle explaining to the Hebrews, points to Jesus as the true High Priest, who in His own blood has entered the secret places of heaven that he might reconcile the Father to us, and intercede for the sins of those who still wait praying before the doors.

AMBROSE; This then is that High Priest who is still sought by lot, for as yet the true High Priest is unknown; for he who is chosen by lot is not obtained by man’s judgment. That High Priest therefore was sought for, and another typified, the true High Priest for ever, who not by the blood of victims, but by His own blood, was to reconcile God the Father to mankind. Then indeed there were changes in the Priesthood, now it is unchangeable.

Ver 11. And there appeared to him an angel of the Lord standing on the right side of the altar of incense.12. And when Zacharias saw him, he was troubled, and fear fell upon him.13. But the angel said to him, Fear not, Zacharias: for your prayer is heard; and your wife Elisabeth shall bear you a son, and you shall call his name John.14. And you shall have joy and gladness; and many shall rejoice at his birth.

CHRYS; When Zacharias entered into the temple to offer up prayers to God for all men, interceding between God and man, he saw an angel standing within, as it is said, And there appeared to him an angel.

AMBROSE; It is well said that there appeared an angel to Zacharias, who suddenly beheld him; and this is the expression especially used by Divine Scripture with respect to angels or God, that what cannot be seen beforehand may be said to appear. For things which are the objects of our senses are not seen as He is seen, Who is seen only as He will, and Whose nature is not to be seen.

ORIGEN; And we speak thus not only of the present time, but also of the future. When we shall have passed from the world, God will not appear to all men, nor will the angels, but to him only who has a clean heart. The place will neither hinder nor serve any one.

CHRYS; But the angel evidently came not in a dream, because the tidings he brought were too hard to be understood, and needed therefore a more visible and marvelous manifestation.

DAMASCENE; Angels, however, are revealed not as they really are, but transformed (as men are able to behold them) into whatever the Lord commands.

THEOPHYL; It is said the altar of incense, because the other altar was set apart for burnt offerings.

AMBROSE; It was not without good reason that the angel appeared in the temple, for the coming of the true High Priest was now announced, and the Heavenly Sacrifice was preparing at which angels were to minister. For one cannot doubt that an angel stands by where Christ is sacrificed. But he appeared at the right hand of the altar of incense, because he brought down the token of Divine mercy. For the Lord is on my right hand, so that I should not be moved.

CHRYS; The justest of men can not without fear behold an angel; Zacharias therefore, not sustaining the sight of the angel’s presence, nor able to withstand his brightness, is troubled, as it is added, Zacharias was troubled. But as it happens, when a charioteer is frightened, and has let loose his reins, the horses run headlong, and the chariot is overturned; so is it with the soul, when it is taken by any surprise or alarm; as it is here added and fear fell upon him.

ORIGEN; A new face suddenly presenting itself to the human eye, troubles and startles the mind. The angel knowing this to be the nature of man, first dispels the alarm, as it follows, But the angel said to him, Fear not.

ATHAN; Whereby it is not difficult to discern between good and bad spirits, for if joy has succeeded to fear, we may know that relief has come from God, because the peace of the soul is a sign of the Divine Presence; but if the fear remains unshaken, it is an enemy who is seen,

ORIGEN; The angel not only soothes his fears, but gladdens him with good tidings, adding, For your prayer is heard, and your wife Elizabeth shall bear a son.

AUG; Now here we must first consider that it is not likely that Zacharias, when offering sacrifice for the sins or for the salvation or redemption of the people, would neglect the public petitions, to pray (though himself an old man, and his wife also old) that he might receive children; and, next, above all that no one prays for what he despairs of ever obtaining. And even up to this time, so much had he despaired of ever having children, that he would not believe, even when an angel promised it to him The words, Your prayer is heard, must be understood therefore to refer to the people; and as salvation, redemption, and the putting away of the sins of the people was to be through Christ, it is told Zacharias that a son shall be born to him, because that son was ordained to be the forerunner of Christ.

CHRYS; Or it means, that this was to be the proof of his prayer having been heard, namely, that a son should be born to him, crying, Behold the Lamb of God!

THEOPHYL; As if when Zacharias asks, How shall I know this? the angel answers, Because Elisabeth shall bring forth a son, you shall believe that the sins of your people are forgiven.

AMBROSE; Or, as follows; Divine mercy is ever full and overflowing, not narrowed to a single gift, but pouring in an abundant store of blessings; as in this case, where first the fruit of his prayer is promised; and next, that his barren wife shall bear a child, whose name is announced as follows; And you shall call his name John.

THEOPHYL; It is meant as a token of particular merit, when a man has a name given him or changed by God.

CHRYS; Which must be the meaning here, for those who from their earliest years were destined to shine forth in virtue, received their names at the very first from a divine source; while those who were to rise up in later years, had a name given them afterwards.

THEOPHYL; John is therefore interpreted, “one in whom is grace, or the grace of God;” by which name it is declared, first, that grace was given to his parents, to whom in their old age a son was to be born, next, to John himself, who was to become great before the Lord; lastly, also to the children of Israel, whom he was to convert to the Lord. Hence it follows, And he shall be a joy to you, and a cause of rejoicing.

ORIGEN; For when a just man is born into the world, the authors of his birth rejoice; but when one is born who is to be as it were an exile to labor and punishment, they are struck with terror and dismay.

AMBROSE; But a saint is not only the blessing of his parents, but also the salvation of many; as it follows, And many shall rejoice at his birth, Parents are reminded here to rejoice at the birth of saints, and to give thanks. For it is no slight gift of God to vouchsafe to us children, to be the transmitters of our race, to be the heirs of succession.

Ver 15. For he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother’s womb.16. And many of the children of Israel shall he turn to the Lord their God.17. And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elias, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord.

AMBROSE; Next to his becoming the rejoicing of many, the greatness his virtue is prophesied; as it is said, For he shall be great in the sight of the Lord. The greatness signified is not of the body, but of the soul. Greatness in the sight of the Lord is greatness of soul, greatness of virtue.

THEOPHYL; For many are called great before men, but not before God, as the hypocrites. And so in like manner was John called great, as the parents of John were called just, before the Lord.AMBROSE; He extended not the boundaries of an empire, nor brought back in triumph the spoils of war, (but, what is far greater,) preaching in the desert he overcame by his great virtue the delights of the world, and the lusts of the flesh. Hence it follows; And he shall drink no wine nor strong drink.

THEOPHYL; Sicera is interpreted “drunkenness,” and by the word the Hebrews understand any drink that can intoxicate, (whether made from fruits, corn, or any other thing.) But it was part of the law of the Nazarites to give up wine and strong drink at the time of their consecration. Hence John, and others like him, that they might always remain Nazarites, (i.e. holy,) are careful always to abstain from these things. For he ought not to be drunk with wine (in which is licentiousness) who desires to be filled with the new wine of the Holy Spirit; rightly then is he, from whom all drunkenness with wine is utterly put away, filled with the grace of the Spirit. But it follows, And he shall be filled with the Holy Spirit.

AMBROSE; On whomsoever the Holy Spirit is poured, in him there is fullness of great virtue; as in St. John, who before he was born, when yet in his mother’s womb, bore witness to the grace of the Spirit which he had received, when leaping in the womb of his parent he hailed the glad tidings of the coming of the Lord. There is one spirit of this life, another of grace. The former has its beginning at birth, its end at death; the latter is not tied down to times and seasons, is not quenched by death, is not shut out of the womb.

GREEK EXPOSITOR; But what John’s work is to be, and what he will do through the Holy Spirit, is shown as follows; And many of the children of Israel shall he turn, &c.

ORIGEN; John indeed turned many, but it is the Lord’s work to turn all to God their Father.

THEOPHYL; Now since John (who, bearing witness to Christ, baptized the people in His faith) is said to have turned the children of Israel to the Lord their God, it is plain that Christ is the God of Israel. Let the Arians then cease to deny that Christ our Lord is God. Let the Photinians blush to ascribe Christ’s beginning to the Virgin. Let the Manichaeans no longer believe that there is one God of the people of Israel, another of the Christians.

AMBROSE; But we need no testimony that St. John turned the hearts of many, for to this point we have the express witness of both prophetic and evangelical Scriptures. For the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare you the way of the Lord, and make His paths straight; and his baptisms thronged by the people, declare the rapid progress of conversion. For the forerunner of Christ preached, not himself, but the Lord; and therefore it follows, And he shall go before Him. It was well said, that he shall go before Him, who both in birth and in death was His forerunner.

ORIGEN; In the spirit and power of Elijah. – He says not, in the mind of Elijah, but in the spirit and power For the spirit which was in Elijah came upon John, and in like manner his power.

AMBROSE; For never is the spirit without power, nor power without the spirit. And therefore it is said, in the spirit and power; because holy Elijah had great power and grace. Power, so that he turned back the false hearts of the people to faith; power of abstinence, and patience, and the spirit of prophecy. Elijah was in the wilderness, in the wilderness also was John. The one sought not the favor of king Ahab; the other despised that of Herod. The one divided Jordan; the other brought men to the Saving waters; John, the forerunner of our Lord’s first coming; Elijah of His latter.

THEOPHYL; But what was foretold of Elias by Malachi, is now spoken by the angel of John; as it follows, That he should turn the hearts of the parents to the children; pouring into the minds of the people, by his preaching, the spiritual knowledge of the ancient saints. And the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; i.e. not laying claim to righteousness from the works of the law, but seeking salvation by faith.

GREEK EX. Or else; The Jews were the parents of John and the Apostles; but, nevertheless, from pride and infidelity raged violently against the Gospel. Therefore, like dutiful children, John first, and the Apostles after him, declared to them the truth, winning them over to their own righteousness and wisdom. So also will Elias convert the remnant of Hebrews to the truth of the Apostles.

THEOPHYL; But because he had said that Zacharias’ prayer for the people was heard, he adds, To make ready a people prepared for the Lord; by which he teaches in what manner the same people must be healed and prepared; namely, by repenting at the preaching of John and believing on Christ.

THEOPHYL. Or, John made ready a people not disbelieving but prepared, that is, previously fitted to receive Christ.

ORIGEN; This sacrament of preparation is even now fulfilled in the world, for even now the spirit and power of John must come upon the soul, before it believes in Jesus Christ.

Ver 18. And Zacharias said to the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.19. And the angel answering said to him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak to you, and to show you these glad tidings.20. And, behold, you shall be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because you believe not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.21. And the people waited for Zacharias, and marveled that he tarried so long in the temple.22. And when he came out, he could not speak to them: and they perceived that he had seen a vision in the temple: for he beckoned to them, and remained speechless.

CHRYS; Considering his own age, and moreover the barrenness of his wife, Zacharias doubted; as it is said, And Zacharias said to the angel, Whereby shall I know this? as if he said, “How shall this be?” And he adds the reason of his doubting; For I am an old man. An unseasonable time of life, an ill-suited nature; the planter infirm, the soil barren. But it is thought by some a thing unpardonable. in the priest, that he raises a course of objections; for whenever God declares any thing, it becomes us to receive it in faith, and moreover, disputes of this kind are the mark of a rebellious spirit.

Hence it follows; And the angel answering said to him, I am Gabriel, who stand before God.

THEOPHYL; As if he says, “If it were man who promised these miracles, one might with impunity demand a sign, but when an angel promises, it is then not right to doubt. It follows; And I am sent to speak to you.

CHRYS. That when you hear that I am sent from God, you should deem none of the things which are said to you to be of man, for I speak not of myself, but declare the message of Him who sends me. And this is the merit and excellence of a messenger to relate nothing of his own.

THEOPHYL; Here we must remark, that the angel testifies, that he both stands before God, and is sent to bring good tidings to Zacharias. GREG. For when angels come to us, they so outwardly fulfill their ministry, as at the same time inwardly to be never absent from His sight; since, though the angelic spirit is circumscribed, the highest Spirit, which is God, is not circumscribed. The angels therefore even when sent are before Him, because on whatever mission they go, they pass within Him.

THEOPHYL; But he gives him the sign which he asks for, that he who spoke in unbelief, might now by silence learn to believe; as it follows; and, behold, you shall be dumb.

CHRYS. That the bonds might be transferred from the powers of generation to the vocal organs. From no regard to the priesthood was he spared, but for this reason was the more smitten, because in a matter of faith he ought to have set an example to others.

THEOPHYL. Because the word in the Greek may also signify deaf, he well says, Because you believe not, you shall be deaf, and shall not be able to speak. For most reasonably he suffered these two things; as disobedient, he incurs the penalty of deafness; as an objector, of silence.

CHRYS. But the Angel says, And, behold; in other words, “At this instant.” But mark the mercy of God in what follows: Until the day in which these things shall be performed. As if he said, “When by the issues of events I shall have proved my words, and you shall perceive that you are lightly punished, I will remove the punishment from you.” And he points out the cause of the punishment, adding, Because you believe not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season; not considering His power Who sent me, and before Whom I stand. But if he who was incredulous about a mortal birth is punished how shall he escape vengeance, who speaks falsely of the heavenly and unspeakable birth?

GREEK EX. Now while these things were going on within the delay excited surprise among the multitudes who were waiting without, as it follows: And the people waited for Zacharias, an marveled that he tarried. And while various -suspicions were going about, each man repeating them as it pleased him, Zacharias coming forth told by his silence what he secretly endured.

Hence it follows, And when he came out, he could not speak.

THEOPHYL. But Zacharias beckoned to the people, who perhaps inquired the cause of his silence, which, as he was not able to speak, he signified to them by nodding. Hence it follows, And he beckoned to them, and remained speechless.

AMBROSE; But a nod is a certain action of the body, without speech endeavoring to declare the will, yet not expressing it.

Ver 23. And it came to pass, that, as soon as the days of his ministration were accomplished, he departed to his own house.24. And after those days his wife Elisabeth conceived, and hid herself five months, saying,25. Thus has the Lord dealt with me in the days wherein he looked on me, to take away my reproach among men.

THEOPHYL; During the time of their course, the priests of the temple were so occupied by their office, that they kept themselves not only from the society of their wives, but even from the very threshold of their houses. Hence it is said, And it came to pass, that, as soon as the days were accomplished, &c. For as there was then required a priestly succession from the root of Aaron, of necessity then a time was appointed for keeping up the inheritance. But as now not a carnal succession, but spiritual perfection, is looked for, the priests are enjoined (in order that they might ever be able to serve the altar) the perpetual observance of chastity.

It follows: But after those days, &c. that is, after the days of Zacharias’s ministration were completed. But these things were done in the month of September, the twenty-second day of the month, upon which the Jews were bound to observe the feast of the Tabernacles, just before the equinox, at which the night began to be longer than the day, because Christ must increase, but John must decrease And those days of fasting were not without their meaning; for by the mouth of John, repentance and mortification were to be preached to men. It follows: And she hid, herself.

AMBROSE; What reason then for concealment, except shame? For there are certain allowed times in wedlock, when it is becoming to attend to the begetting of children; while the years thrive, while there is hope of child-bearing. But when in good time old age has come on, and the period of life is more fitted for governing children, than begetting them, it is a shame to bear about the signs of pregnancy, however lawful. It is a shame to be laden with the burden of another age, and for the womb to swell with the fruit of not one’s own time of life. It was a shame then to her on account of her age; and hence we may understand the reason why they did not at this time come together, for surely she who blushed not at their coming together in their old age, would not blush at her child-bearing; and yet she blushes at the parental burden, while she yet is unconscious of the religious mystery. But she who hid herself because she had conceived a son, began to glory that she carried in her womb a prophet.

ORIGEN; And therefore he says, Five months, that is, until Mary should conceive, and her babe leaping with joy should prophesy.

AMBROSE; And though she might blush at the time of her child-bearing, on the other hand she rejoiced that she was free from reproach, saying, Thus has the Lord, dealt with me.

CHRYS. Truly He has loosed her barrenness, a supernatural gift He has bestowed upon her, and the unfruitful rock has produced the green blade. He has taken away her disgrace, in that He has made her to bring forth. Hence it follows: In the days wherein he looked on me, to take away my reproach among men.

AMBROSE; For it is a shame among women not to receive that reward of marriage, which is the only cause of their being married.

CHRYS. Her joy therefore is twofold. of old. The Lord has taken away from her the mark of barrenness, and also given her an illustrious offspring. In the case of other births, the coming together of the parents only occurs; this birth was the effect of heavenly grace.

THEOPHYL; Now mystically by Zacharias may be signified the Jewish Priesthood, by Elisabeth the law itself; which, well administered by the teaching of the Priests, ought to have borne spiritual children to God, but was not able, because the Law made no one perfect. Both were just, because the law is good, and the Priesthood for that time holy; both were well stricken in years, because at Christ’s coming both the Law and Priesthood were just bending to old age. Zacharias enters the temple, because it is the priest’s office to enter into the sanctuary of heavenly mysteries. There was a multitude without the doors, because the multitude cannot penetrate mysteries. When he places frankincense on the altar, he discovers that John will be born; for while the teachers are kindled with the flame of divine reading, they find the grace of God flow to them through Jesus: and this is done by all angel, for the Law was ordained by angels.

AMBROSE; But in one man the voice of the people was put to silence, because in one man the whole people was addressing God. For the word of God has come over to us, and in us is not silent. He is dumb who understands not the Law; for why should you think the man who knows not a sound, to be more dumb than him who knows not a mystery. The Jewish people are like to one beckoning, who cannot make his actions intelligible.

THEOPHYL; And yet Elisabeth conceives John, because the more inward parts of the Law abound with sacraments of Christ. She conceals her conception five months, because Moses in five books set forth the mysteries of Christ; or because the dispensation of Christ is represented by the words or deeds of the saints, in the five ages of the world.

 

 

 

 

 

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Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Annunciation

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 17, 2014

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Isaiah 7:10-14, 8:10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 7:10-14, 8:10.

Word-Sunday Notes on Isaiah 7:10-14, 18:10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 40:7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 40.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 40.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 40.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Hebrews 10:4-10.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 10:4-10.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 10:4-10.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Hebrews 10. Click on the POD button or the direct download to listen.

Word-Sunday Notes on Hebrews 10:4-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 10:4-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 1:26-38.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:26-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 1:26-38.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Luke 1:26-38. Click on POD button or direct download to listen.

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Commentaries for the Second Week of Advent

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 15, 2014

SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT
NOTE: We are in Year A.

Year A Commentaries. Justice and peace are to be the marks of the Messiah and His reign (1st reading, Ps). We must reform our lives (Gospel) and live in harmony with others (2nd reading). Note the theme of judgment in 1st, Ps, and Gospel readings.

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

Update: Extraordinary Form~Commentaries on the Readings.

The Religion of the Antichrist: Cardinal Newman’s Second Advent Discourse.

MONDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Isaiah 35:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 35:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 85.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II on Psalm 85.

My Notes on Psalm 85.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 5:17-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 5:17-26.

My Notes on Luke 5:17-26.

TUESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Isaiah 40:1-11.

My Notes on Isaiah 40:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 40:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 18:12-14.

Cornelius a Lapdie’s Commentary on Matthew 18:12-14.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 18:12-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 18:12-14.

WEDNESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

My Notes on Isaiah 40:25-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 40:25-31.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 103.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:28-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

THURSDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT
NOTE: This year this day falls on Dec. 8, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. The first link below is to commentaries for this feast, the links that follow are commentaries for the normal Advent weekday.

Commentaries for the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 41:13-20.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 145.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 145.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 11:11-15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:11-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:11-15.

FRIDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 48:17-19.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 1.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 1.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 1.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 1.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 1.

My Notes on Psalm 1.

Father E.S. Berry’s Notes on Psalm 1.

A Lectio Divina Reflection on Psalm 1.

A Brief Meditation on Psalm 1.

Father Ronald Knox’s Meditation on Psalm 1.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:16-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 11:16-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:16-19.

SATURDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 48:1-4, 9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 80.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 80.

My Notes on Psalm 80.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 17:9-13.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 17:9-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 17:9-13.

THIRD SUNDAY OF ADVENT
NOTE: We are in Year A.

Year A Commentaries. The time of the Messiah was to be marked by integral healing and salvation (1st reading). In His person and mission, heralded by the Baptist, our Lord manifested and communicated such healing and salvation (gospel). We are called upon to wait patiently for the fullness of the Messianic age (2nd reading), as we glorify the works of God and look forward to the final coming of the Lord (Ps).

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

Update: The City of the Antichrist: Cardinal Newman’s Third Advent Discourse.

Next Week’s Commentaries.

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March 19~Commentaries for the Solemnity of St Joseph, Husband of Mary

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 15, 2014

GENERAL:

Pope Benedict XVI’s Homily on Today’s Readings (Solemnity of St Joseph).

St Augustine’ City of God on Today’s First Reading and Psalm 89. Augustine’s brief treatment of Psalm 89 in this post differs from his notes (see next link).

COMMENTARIES OF THE FIRST READING: 2 Samuel 7:4-5a, 12-14, 16.

Word-Sunday Notes on 2 Samuel 7:4-5a, 12-14, 16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s First Reading (2 Sam 7:4-5a, 12-14, 16).

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 89:2-3, 4-5, 27 and 29.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89. Notes are to the entire Psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22. This post is on verses 13-25.

Pending: Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22.

Word-Sunday Notes on Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18, 22.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 1:16, 18-21, 24a. Alternative reading further below.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 1:16, 18-21, 24a.

Word-Sunday Notes on Matthew 1:16, 18-21, 24a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 1:16, 18-21, 24a.

Alternative: COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 2:41-51a.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 2:41-51a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:41-51a.

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Feb. 22~Commentaries for the Feast of the Chair of St Peter

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 15, 2014

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: 1 Peter 5:1-4.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 Peter 5:1-4.

My Notes on 1 Peter 5:1-4. On 1-11.

Word-Sunday Notes on 1 Peter 5:1-4.

Navarre Bible Commentary 1 Peter 5:1-4.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 23:1-3a, 4, 5, 6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 23.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 23.

Pseudo-St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 23.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 23.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 23.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 23.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 16:13-19.

Juan de Maldonado on Matthew 16:13-19. Actually, this post includes verses 20-23.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 16:13-19.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 16:13-19. On 13-23.

Word-Sunday Notes on Matthew 16:13-19.

Navarre Commentary on Matthew 16:13-19.

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Commentaries for the First Week of Advent

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 11, 2014

FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT
NOTE: We Are in Year C

Year A Commentaries.

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

EXTRAORDINARY FORM: Commentaries and Resources.

The Time of the Antichrist: Newman’s First Advent Discourse. The first of four discourse on the Antichrist by John Henry Newman.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT
In 2015 this day falls on Nov 30, the Feast of St Andrew the Apostle. The first link below is to commentaries for that Feast. Remaining links concern the regular readings.

Commentaries for the Feast of St Andrew, Apostle.

My Notes on Isaiah 2:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 2:1-5.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 122.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 122.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 122.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on 122.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 8: 8:5-11.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew  8:5-11.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:5-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:5-11.

TUESDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

Father Maas’ Commentary on Isaiah 11:1-10. This post is actually on verses 1-16.

My Notes on Isaiah 11:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 11:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 72.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 72.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 72.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 10:21-24.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 10:21-24.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

Haydock’s Commentary on Isaiah 25:6-10. Very basic notes.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 25:6-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 23.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 23.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 23.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 23.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 15:29-37.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 15:29-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 15:29-37.

THURSDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

My Notes on Isaiah 26:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 26:1-6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 118.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 118.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 118.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21, 24-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:21, 24-27. This post includes commentary on verses 22 & 23 as well.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21, 24-27. This post includes commentary on verses 22 & 23 as well.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:21, 24-27. On 21-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:21, 24-27.

FRIDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

Pending (maybe): My Notes on Isaiah 29:17-24.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 29:17-24.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 27.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 27.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 27.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:27-31.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:27-31.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 9:27-31.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:27-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 9:27-31.

SATURDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 30:19-21, 23-26.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 147.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 147.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 147. On verses 1-11.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:35-10:1, 5a, 6-8.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:35-10:1, 5a, 6-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 9:35-10:1, 5a, 6-8.

SUNDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT
NOTE: We Are in Year C

Year A Commentaries.

Year B Commentaries.

Year C Commentaries.

Update: Extraordinary Form~Commentaries on the Readings.

The Religion of the Antichrist: Cardinal Newman’s Second Advent Discourse.

Next Week’s Posts.

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Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Advent, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 11, 2014

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: 2 Samuel 7:1-5, 8b-12, 14a, 16.

Word-Sunday Notes on 2 Samuel 7:1-5, 8b-12, 14a, 16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Samuel 7:1-5, 8b-12, 14a, 16.

St Augustine on Aspects of 2 Sam 7 in relation to Psalm 89.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm89:2-3, 4-5, 27-29.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 89.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 16:25-27.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 16:25-27.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 16:25-27.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Romans 16:25-27.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 16:25-27.

Word-Sunday Notes on Romans 16:25-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 16:25-27.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 1:26-38.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 1:26-38.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 1:26-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 1:26-38.

OTHER RESOURCES: examines one or more of the readings.

The Once and Future King. A blog post on the readings from Catholic biblical scholar John Bergsma.

Lector Notes. Brief theological and historical background. Can be printed, copied and used as a bulletin insert.

Parish Bible Study Notes on the Readings.

St Martha’s Podcast. Audio online. Looks at the readings in some detail.

Dr. Scott Hahn Podcast. Audio online. Very brief. Highlights main theme(s) of the readings. Text available.

Fr. Robert Barron’s Homily Podcast. A noted author, theologian and speaker.

 

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August 6: Commentaries for the Feast of the Transfiguration, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 10, 2014

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14.

Word-Sunday Notes on Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14.

Sacred Space Commentary on Daniel 7:9-10, 13-14.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 97:1-2, 5-6, 9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

St Augustine’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 97.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 2 Peter 1:16-19.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on 2 Peter 1:16-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Peter 1:16-19.

Word-Sunday Notes on 2 Peter 1:16-19.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 17:1-9.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 17:1-9.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 17:1-9.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 17:1-9.

Word-Sunday Notes on Matthew 17:1-9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 17:1-9.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 17:1-9.

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