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Archive for April, 2015

Commentaries on the Fifth Sunday of Easter, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2015

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings in the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB. Used in most English speaking countries.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 9:26-31~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 9:26-31.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on Acts 9:26-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 9:26-31.

Haydock Bible Commentary on Acts 9:26-31. Very basic.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 22:26-27, 28, 30, 31-32~

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 22.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Commentary on Psalm 22. Psalm 21 in his translation. Latin and English text are side by side. Post is on entire Psalm.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 22. Post is on entire Psalm.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 22. Pdf. One page near the end is blank but just scroll past it, the text itself in not interrupted.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 John 3:18-24~

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:18-24.

St Augustine’s Homily on 1 John 3:18-24.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:18-24.

Haydock Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:18-24. Very basic.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 John 3:18-24.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 15:1-8~

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:1-8.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 15:1-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:1-8.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 15:1-8.

Haydock Bible Commentary on John 15:1-8. very basic.

Father MacIntyre’s Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:1-8.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 15:1-8.

NOTES, COMMENTARIES, BLOG POSTS ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL: Commentaries on particular readings listed further below.

Word Sunday. Brief notes on the readings.

Sacerdos. Theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Bible Study Notes. Prepared for their own bible study classes, apparently.

The Sacred Page Blog. Catholic biblical Scholar Dr. John Bergsma looks at the readings and gighlights a specific theme: “Christians are called to remain: remain in Christ, remain in the Church, remain in love with each other.”

CHILDREN AND TEEN RESOURCES:

Proclaiming the Faith. Grade School Level.

(1) Faith First. Grades 1-3, I think.

(2) Faith First. Grades 4-6, I think.

(3) Faith First. Middle School.

PODCASTS:

St Martha’s Podcast. Looks at all the readings in some detail.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Very brief. Does good job highlighting major theme(s).

Father McBride’s Podcast on Acts 9. Listen to episode 5.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John 15. Click on the POD icon or the direct download link.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES: Pending.

Update: Father Barron’s Podcast Homily. From a noted theologian and speaker.

Torch. Dominican website. Text homily on St Paul in Acts.

Catholic Doors Ministry. Text.

Augustinian Friends. Text.

Sunday Soundbite. Audio or text. Very brief.

Father Robert Altier’s Homily. Text.

Fr. Tommy Lane on Bear Fruit. Text.

Fr. Tommy Lane: Guarding the Deposit of Faith and Bearing Fruit for the Kingdom. Text.

Today’s Good News. Text, very brief.

Pope John Paul II. 2000 homily.

Pope John Paul II. 2003 homily.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Christ, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Fourth Week of Easter

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 25, 2015

FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Easter.

Year B: Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Easter.

Year C: Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Easter.

MONDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 11:1-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 11:1-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 11:1-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 42.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 42.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary 42.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 10: 11-18.

Cornelius a Lapide Commentary  John 10:11-18.

St Augustine’s Commentary on John 10:11-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 10:11-18.

TUESDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 11:19-26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 11:19-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 11:19-26.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 87.

Father McSwiney’s Introduction and Brief Notes on Psalm 87.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 87.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 10:22-30. Previously posted.

Aquinas’ Lecture on John 10:22-30. This is his 5th lecture on John 10 and it examines verses 19-30.

St Cyril of Alexandria on John 10:22-30. This post is on John 10:18-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 10:22-30.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

My Notes on Acts 12:24-13:5a.

Father MacEvilly’s Notes on Acts 12:24-13:5a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 12:24-13:5a.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 67.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on psalm 67.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 57.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 12:44-50.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 12:44-50.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 12:44-50.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 12:44-50.

THURSDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 13:13-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 13:13-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 13:13-25.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Father’s Nolan and Brown’s Commentary on John 13:16-20.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 13:16-20.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 13:16-20. Scroll UP slightly and read lectures 3 & 4.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 13:16-20.

FRIDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 13:26-33.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 13:26-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 13:26-33.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 2.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 2.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 2. Latin and English side by side.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 2.

My Notes on Psalm 2.

St Cyril of Alexandria Homiletic Commentary on John 14:1-6.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:1-6.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 14:1-6.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 14:1-6.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 14:1-6. Read lectures 1 & 2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:1-6.

SATURDAY OF THE FOURTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 13:44-52.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 13:44-52.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 13:44-52.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:7-14.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 14:7-14.

Father’s Nolan and Brown’s Commentary on John 14:7-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:7-14.

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year A

YEAR A: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

YEAR B: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

YEAR C: COMMENTARIES FOR THE FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

Next Week’s Posts.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 18, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings From the NABRE. Used in USA.

Mass Readings From the NJB. Used in most English speaking countries.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 4:8-12.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 4:8-12. Commentary actually begins with verse 1.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 4:8-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 4:8-12. Begins with verse 7.

St John Chrysostom’s Tenth Homiletic Commentary on Acts.

Homilist’s Catechism. Catechism passages referencing the reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Ps 118:1, 8-9, 21-23, 26, 28, 29.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 118.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 118 (117 in Vulgate). On whole Psalm.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 118. On whole Psalm.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 118. On whole Psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 John 3:1-2.

St Augustine’s Commentary on 1 John 3:1-2.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 John 3:1-2.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:1-2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:1-2. Includes comments on vs. 3.

Homilist’s Catechism.  Catechism passages using the reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 10:11-18.

Haydock Commentary on John 10:11-18. Very basic.

Cornelius a Lapide on John 10:11-18.

Aquina’s Catena Aurea on John 10:11-18. Commentary extends to verse 21.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 10.  There are a total of six lectures, numbers 3 & 4 deal with this Sunday’s text.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 10:11-18.

St Augustine’s Commentary on John 10:11-18.

Homilist’s Catechism. Catechism passages using the reading.

The Noble Shepherd in John 10: Cultural and Rhetorical Background. Fr. Jerome Neyrey’s article from the Journal of Biblical Literature.

Jesus the Good Shepherd (Old Testament Background of a Familiar Metaphor. Non-catholic author. Article from the Journal of Biblical Literature.

Poor Little Sheep Who Have Found the Way. Brief article from biblical scholar Father John Donahue.

NOTES, COMMENTARIES, BLOG POSTS ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL:  Commentaries on particular readings listed further below.

The Scandalous Jesus. Blog post on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma of The Sacred Page.

Word Sunday. Brief notes on the readings.

Sacerdos. Theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Study Notes. Prepared for their own bible study classes, apparently.

CHILDREN AND TEEN RESOURCES:

Proclaiming the Faith. Grade school level, I think.

(1) Faith First. Grades 1-3, I think.

(2) Faith First. Grades 4-6, I think.

(3) Faith First. Middle School level (i.e., Junior High).

Catholic Culture on the 4th Sunday of Easter. Suitable for High School level.

PODCASTS:

(1) St Martha’s Podcast. Studies all the readings of the day in some detail.

(2) St Martha’s Podcast. Different study of the readings, different presenter from above.

Dr Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Very brief. Does good job highlighting major theme(s) of the readings.

Father McBride’s Podcast on Acts 4. Listen to episode 3.

Dr. Tim Gray’s Podcast Study of John. From EWTN. Listen to episode 9.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John. On chapters 10-11.

HOMILIES & HOMILY NOTES:

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on John 10:11-16.

The Sacred Passion: Homiletic Sketch On The Epistle.

Christ The Good Shepherd: Homiletic Sketch On The Gospel.

The Church And Salvation: Dogmatical Sketch On The Gospel. Scroll down slightly to find the beginning of the sermon.

The Meaning Of The Five Sundays After Easter: Liturgical sketch.  Scroll down slightly.

The Qualities Of The Sheep Of Christ: Symbolical Sketch.

We Must Be Good Shepherds Of Our Souls: Moral Sketch.

The Signs Of Election: Moral Sketch.

 

 

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 4:8-12

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 18, 2015

Acts 4: 8 Then Peter, filled with the Holy Ghost, said to them: Ye princes of the people and ancients, hear.

8. “Filled with the Holy Ghost” denotes a particular actual grace given him on this occasion, strongly influencing him; different or distinct from the habitual graces given him on Pentecost Sunday. Ordinary and habitual grace would not suffice for heroic deeds. A new actual grace is required. Thus, it is said of Sampson, on occasion of his wonderful displays of strength, “the spirit of the Lord came strongly upon him” (Judges 15:14).

How different is Peter’s conduct from what it had been on a former occasion. Then, trembling at the empty chidings of a silly maid, he denied his Lord. Now, as head of the Apostolic College, boldly confronting the united authority of the Jews, he makes reparation for his former crime by loudly proclaiming his Divine Messiahship, preaching the glorious Resurrection of the Crucified, whose power they were after witnessing in the miraculous cure of the lame man. Showing the deference due to their office, he respectfully addresses them as representatives of the supreme authority among the Jews, “Princes of the people,” &c. Before the same Council, the same men, in the same place and city, he repaires the scandal he gave in denying his Divine Master.

Acts 4:9 If we this day are examined concerning the good deed done to the infirm man, by what means he hath been made whole:

“If we this day,” &c. If notwithstanding the evidence of the fact, we are to be treated as criminals, brought to trial and subjected to judicial examination for the good deed of having bestowed the blessing of a perfect cure on the infirm man—which should be rather a subject of praise—and called to render an account of how “he has been made whole.” “If” conveys surprise at such an extraordinary proceeding, a matter scarcely credible.

Acts 4:10 Be it known to you all and to all the people of Israel, that by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth, whom you crucified, whom God hath raised from the dead, even by him, this man standeth here before you, whole.

As you ask by what name we did this, be it known to you and all the world, it was by invoking the name and exercising the power “of our Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth.” The term of Nazareth was the epithet by which our Lord was known and scornfully referred to by the Jews. “Crucified,” “raised from the dead.” The contrast is so striking. They put him to death. God raised him up from the dead. The accusers now become the accused. With singular intrepidity and courage, St. Peter heretofore so timid, charges them with the greatest crime that could be perpetrated, the murder of their own long-expected Messiah and deliverer, putting to death the author of life.

“Standeth here,” &c. It may be that the cured man was imprisoned or guarded with the Apostles, and, very likely, brought forward at the trial to confront them.

Acts 4:11 This is the stone which was rejected by you the builders, which is become the head of the corner.

He shows that the ignominious death and Resurrection of our Lord was predicted by the Prophets. He thus strengthens his argument, especially with the Jews, who valued so much the oracles of their inspired Prophets. The first part of Psalm 117, from which the quotation is taken, literally refers to David himself. The second part, also quoted, could refer to our Lord only, in its literal sense, and is quoted by our Lord as applying to Himself (Matthew 21:42). Here is a metaphorical allusion to architecture; skilful architects place in the corners of a building the largest and most binding stone, in order to unite and sustain the two walls of the building. It thus gets the most important place. St. Peter applies this prediction to our Lord, who was scornfully rejected by the Jewish rulers, the Priests, and Scribes, the builders of the Synagogue, who should labour for the construction of God’s spiritual house, and should, therefore, be the first to receive our Lord. But while they rejected Him, God placed Him as the head “corner stone,” sustaining, upholding, and fusing into one the two peoples, Jews and Gentiles, who were to form the Church. He united the old and new dispensations. In Him all the elect of old were justified, no less than the children of the New Law. To this our Lord alludes (Matthew 21:42. See Commentary on).

Isaiah had predicted it (Isa 28:16). See also 1 Peter 2–4.

Acts 4:12 Neither is there salvation in any other. For there is no other name under heaven given to men, whereby we must be saved.

Having assured them in figurative terms, that Christ was the Messiah, St. Peter now, in language devoid of all figure, adds, as a consequence, that in him only can man find eternal Salvation.

“Name” often signifies person or being. No one else can save us from the consequences of sin, viz., hell and damnation; and bestow on us eternal joy and peace in Heaven—the chief object of our Lord’s Mission. The Apostle avails himself of this corporal cure to place before the assembled Sanhedrim the greater cure and salvation from Hell which our Lord came to bring about.

Our Lord is frequently marked out, “given” as the source of this greater and universal Salvation. (John 3:16), (1 Cor. 3:5), (1 Tim. 2:6), &c.

“Must be saved” in the present order of Divine Providence, whereby our Lord is constituted the only source of eternal life and salvation.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Notes on Acts of Apostles, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 4:32-37

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 12, 2015

Acts 4:32 And the multitude of believers had but one heart and one soul. Neither did any one say that aught of the things which he possessed was his own: but all things were common unto them. ‎

“The multitude of believers,” five thousand (c. 4:4) “one heart and one soul,” indicating the closest and tenderest union. Plutarch, in his life of Cato, quotes a saying, “two friends, one soul.” This tender union was evidenced in their relations with one another. They showed this in act, in the distribution of their property and their unselfishly giving up what they possessed to relieve the distressed members of their body.

Acts 4:33 And with great power did the Apostles give testimony of the resurrection of Jesus Christ our Lord: and great grace was in them all. ‎

Their prayer in regard to the power of working miracles having been heard, they accordingly perform miracles in corroboration of their zealous preaching of the Gospel, especially the Resurrection of Christ, the foundation of all Christian faith. Some interpret “great power” to mean the zealous preaching of the Gospel, as in the case of St. Paul (1 Cor. 2:4).

“Great grace,” &c. By this some understand grace properly so called, which, undoubtedly, was accorded them in an extraordinary degree, and was manifested among the faithful, as shown by their disinterestedness, as in next verse. Others understand it of favour with the people, a sense in which the Greek word, χαρις, is sometimes taken (c. 2:47). It was very important for them that it should be so, considering what occurred at the meeting of the Sanhedrim. Their union and charity towards the poor caused them to be held in great esteem among the people.

Some commentators hold that this v. 33 is misplaced owing to the negligence of copyists, that v. 34 should immediately follow v. 32, or that v. 33 should be read parenthetically.

Acts 4:34 For neither was there any one needy among them. For as many as were owners of lands or houses sold them and brought the price of the things they sold,

The account of the demeanour and qualities of the faithful commencing at v. 32 was interrupted in v. 33, and is here resumed again.

“For.” The corresponding Greek word is understood by Beelen to signify “therefore,” expressing a conclusion from v. 32. “No one needy” allowed to suffer want. The reason of this is given in a general way in v. 32, “all things common,” &c. It is explained here more particularly how this was done.

“For as many,” &c. The words here used indefinitely by no means convey that all the Christian cover’s sold their entire property and possessions, giving up their title to them; but only parted with whatever portion was necessary to relieve the pressing wants of their indigent brethren with whom all things were common as to use, so far as was necessary. This, however, was not obligatory, but rather quite voluntary, as appears from the case of Ananias (c. 5:4); and the singling out of Joseph (v. 36) as a singular instance of generosity would indicate the same. Doubtless, he had many imitators who sold so much of their property as was necessary for the relief of the poor.

This edifying economy practised in the early Christian Church of Jerusalem was neither general nor permanent. The Apostles, in their intercourse with their Gentile converts, did not deem it wise to establish it. Hence, their appeals to the churches they founded on behalf of the poor. It is not likely that even in the Church of Jerusalem men sold all they possessed—St. John had retained some property (John 19:27), nor is there any evidence that in Jerusalem they sold all their property, save as far as was necessary to relieve their distressed brethren.

Acts 4:35 And laid it down before the feet of the apostles. And distribution was made to every one, according as he had need. ‎

“And laid it down,” conveys that it was left for disposal “before the feet,” &c., in token of respect and reverence. The Apostles finding the duty of distributing their alms becoming too burdensome and distracting, as it interfered with prayer and preaching the word (c. 6:1, 2), appointed others for this special duty (c. 6:1, 2).

Acts 4:36 And Joseph, who, by the apostles, was surnamed Barnabas (which is, by interpretation, The son of consolation), a Levite, a Cyprian born, ‎

“Joseph,” which is sometimes read with a Greek termination, Joses. However, the vulgate reading is the more probable. He is different from the Joseph mentioned (1:23), “by the Apostles was surnamed Barnabas.” St. Luke explains the meaning of Barnabas to be “the son of consolation” The strict etymology of the Hebrew word means “son of Prophecy.” But, St. Luke interprets “son of consolation,” or exhortation, because one of the chief ends of prophecy was to exhort, console; and it would seem that Barnabas afterwards displayed this gift in an eminent degree. Barnabas is most probably singled out because of his exemplary liberality, and of his being afterwards distinguished as a zealous preacher of the Gospel. He is frequently referred to in the Acts as the companion of St. Paul, 11:22–30; 12:25; 13:1–50.

St. Luke interprets it “the son of consolation,” or rather exhortation. παρακλησεως. Barnabas was most probably surnamed the son of exhortation on account of his talent and success in preaching, and the gift of prophecy with which Barnabas was favoured was given in the Church for instruction unto edification.

“A Levite” descended from Levi. The Levites were employed in the lower services of the temple and assisting the priests in the discharge of their office.

“A Cyprian born.” After the captivity the Jewish race were dispersed all over the earth. There were many Jews in the Island of Cyprus (Dion. Lib. 68, 69).

Acts 4:37 Having land, sold it and brought the price and laid it at the feet of the Apostles.

“Having land, sold it.” By Divine arrangement (Numbers 18:20, 23) the Levites, as a tribe, were prohibited from holding lands in Judea, except pasture lands in the immediate vicinity of their cities (Numbers 30:3, 4). This prohibition did not comprise individuals even in Judea nor the countries outside Judea. This prohibitory law in regard to the Levites had fallen into disuse (Jeremiah 32:7). Moreover, the property of Barnabas may have been in Cyprus. Levites could purchase land and have a title to it in right of their wives.

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Commentaries for the Third Sunday of Easter, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 11, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

NABRE: Today’s Mass Readings. used in the U.S.

NJB: Today’s Mass Readings. New Jerusalem Bible commonly used outside US. Scroll down for readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: (Acts 3:13-15, 17-19).

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19. .

Haydock Bible Commentary on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19.

Word Sunday on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 3:13-15, 17-19

COMMENTARY ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: (Psalm 4:2, 4, 7-8, 9).

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 4.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 4.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 4. On whole Psalm.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 4.

My Notes on Psalm 4.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 4. On entire Psalm.

Father E.S. Berry’s Commentary on Psalm 4.

Haydock Commentary on Psalm 4.

COMMENTARY ON THE SECOND READING: (1 John 2:1-5a).

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:1-5a.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 John 2:1-5a.

St Augustine’s Commentary on 1 John 2:1-5a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:1-5a.

Haydock Commentary on 1 John 2:1-5a.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 John 2:1-5a.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: (Lk 24:35-48).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 24:35-48.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 24:35-48.

Haydock Commentary on Luke 24:35-48.

Homilist’s Catechism on Luke 24:35-48.

Christian Leadership Center on Luke 2:35-48. Technically not a commentary. Helpful suggestions for a homily.

PODCASTS AND VIDEOCASTS: Bible studies and homilies.

Father McBride’s Podcast on Acts 3. Listen to episode 3.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Luke 24. Download or click on the “POD” icon.

(1) St Martha’s Podcast. This first study employs content and a presenter different from the second.

(2) St Martha’s Podcast. This second study employs content and a presenter different from the first.

Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily. Noted speaker and theologian.

Dr. Scott Hahn Podcast. Very brief. Does good job of highlighting the major theme(s) of the readings.

ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL:

Lector Notes. Brief, helpful historical and theological background. Can be printed out and used as a bulletin insert.

Catholic Mom’s Resource Page. Scroll down for the April 22 resources.

Get to Know the Readings.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Bible Study Notes.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines. Gives theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

Dr. John Bergsma’s Blog Post on the Readings. One of the scholars writing at The Sacred Page blog.

HOMILIES AND HELPS FOR HOMILETICS: Texts

He Waits for You To Approach Him.  Father Tommy Lane.

Jesus’ Forgiveness Flow to Us From the Cross. Fr. Tommy Lane.

Fr. John Thornhill, SM.

You Catholics, you’re always talking about sin. Why can’t you give it a rest? Fr. John Speekman.

Lector Works. “A series of thoughts about the lectionary readings of the day, as an oral proclamation within the church’s public prayer, and how the writer would want to have them declared and received effectively.“

Lector Notes. Brief theological and Historical background on readings. Can be copied and used as bulletin insert.

Catechist’s Background and Preparation. From Faith First. Also linked under “For Children.”

FOR CHILDREN:

Children’s Sermon. Includes links to children’s activities at the end.

Children’s Readings. From Word Sunday.

Catechist’s Background and Preparation. From Faith First.

Primary Level Children’s Lesson Plan. I’m guessing grades 1-3.

Intermediate Level Children’s Lesson Plan. I’m guessing grades 4-6.

Junior High Level. Grades 7-8 (Middle School).

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for Divine Mercy Sunday, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 9, 2015

Readings and Office:

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 4:32-35

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 4:32-35.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 4:32-35.

Papal Magisterium on Acts 4:32-35.

Word Sunday’s Notes on Acts 4:32-35.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 4:32-35. Runs to verse 37, posted for another occasion.

Haydock Commentary on Acts 4:32-35. Notes on whole chapter.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 4:32-35. Popup window of catechism excerpts. The window must be closed before you can access other catechism links.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 118:2-4, 13-15, 22-24

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 118.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 118. Entire psalm.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 118. On entire Psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 118.

Word Sunday on Psalm 118. Brief notes on entire Psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 John 5:1-6

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 5:1-6. On verses 1-9 actually.

St Augustine’s Homily on 1 John 5:1-3.

Word Sunday on 1 John 5:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 5:1-6.

Haydock Commentary on 1 John 5:1-6. Notes on whole chapter.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 John 6:1-6.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: John 20:19-31

Father McIntyre’s Commentary on John 20:19-31.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 20:19-31.

Part 1: St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 20:19-31. On 19-23.

Part 2: St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 20:19-31. On 24-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 20:19-31.

St Augustine’s Tractate 121 on the Gospel of John. Rather brief.

Word Sunday on John 20:19-31.

Catena Aurea on John 20:19-31.

Aquinas’ Commentary on the Gospel of John 20:19-31. Read lectures 4-6.

Haydock Commentary on John 20:19-31. Notes on whole chapter.

Homilists Catechism on John 20:19-31.

ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL:

Lector Notes. Brief, helpful historical and theological background. Can be printed out and used as a bulletin insert.

Get to Know the Readings.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Bible Study Notes.

Sacerdos. Gives theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

How Precious is that Flow? Blog post on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

PODCASTS:

Father McBride’s Podcast on Acts 4. Listen to episode 3.

Dr. Tim Gray on John. Listen to episode 12.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on John. Includes the resurrection appearance to St Mary Magdalene, the commissioning of the disciples, and the appearance to St Thomas. Several seconds to download.

Father Robert Barron’s Homily.

TEXT HOMILIES ON THE GOSPEL: The following links are (mostly) to online books containing sermons and homilies on the Gospel reading. You can click on the site’s zoom feature (magnifying glass icon) to increase text size for easier reading.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on John 20:19-31.

First Homily on John 20:19-31.

Second Homily on John 20:19-31.

A Homily for Low Sunday (First Sunday After Easter).

A Homiletic Sketch on the Gospel.

A Dogmatical Sketch on the Gospel.

A Symbolical Sketch on the Gospel.

A Moral Sketch on the Gospel.

Another Moral Sketch on the Gospel.

Sunday Reflections. Blog post by Fr. Eugene Lobo.

THEOLOGY:

Aquinas’ Lecture on the Creed’s “I believe in the Resurrection of the body“.

Matthias Scheeben on the Resurrection of the Body.

The Resurrection of the Flesh.

The Resurrection: A Biblical Study. A seminal work of the 20th century by Father F. X. Durrwell.

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