The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for October, 2015

Commentaries for the Second Sunday of Advent, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 17, 2015

  SECOND SUNDAY OF ADVENT, YEAR C

READINGS AND MISSAL:

Mass Readings in the NABRE Translation. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Used in most English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Baruch 5:1-9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Baruch 5:1-9.

My Notes on Baruch 5:1-9.

Word-Sunday Notes on Baruch 5:1-9.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 126:1-6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 126.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 126.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 126.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 126.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 126.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 126.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11. On 1-11.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11. On 3-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11. On 3-6, 8-11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11. Read lectures 1 & 2.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11. On 1-11.

Word-Sunday Notes on Philippians 1:4-6, 8-11.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Luke 3:1-6.

My Notes on Luke 3:1-6.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 3:1-6.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 3:1-6.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 3:1-6.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 3:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 3:1-6.

GENERAL RESOURCES: sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings (off the mark this week, in my opinion), the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

Scripture Speaks. I’ve linked to the archive. This Sunday’s post not yet available.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: “Make Straight the Paths.”  Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma reflects on the readings.

PODCASTS:

St Martha’s Bible Study Podcast. This episode has a substitute speaker and the sound quality is rather poor.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast.

Father Mike’s Introduction to Baruch. On Lamentation, Baruch, Ezekiel.

Father Mike’s Introduction to Philippians. Philippians-Thessalonians.

Father Mike’s Introduction to Luke.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Luke 3-4. Click on POD icon or direct download to listen. A brief written summary of the talk is provided as well.

(1) Father Barron’s Podcast Homily: Be Ready. From a noted author, theologian, speaker.

(2) Father Barron’s Podcast Homily: Return Home.

(3) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: The Steadfast Love of God.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief, does good job of highlighting major theme(s) of the readings.

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November 30~Commentaries for the Feast of St Andrew, Apostle

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 17, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 10:9-18. On 9-21.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 10:9-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 10:9-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 10:9-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 19.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

My Notes on Matthew 4:18-22. On 12-22.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 4:18-22. On 12-22.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 4:18-22. On 12-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 4:18-22.

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Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 10:9-18

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 17, 2015

To help provide context this post includes Fr. Callan’s brief summaries of Romans 10:5-13 and 10:14-21.

THE JUSTICE OF THE LAW AND THE JUSTICE OF FAITH

A Summary of Romans 10:5-13~The Apostle speaks in these verses, first of the justice of the Law, as contrasted with the justice of faith; he then shows that this latter is also necessary for the salvation of the Jews; there is no distinction, both Jew and Gentile must be saved by faith.

9. For if thou confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and believe in thy heart that God hath raised him up from the dead, thou shalt be saved.

The Apostle explains yet more clearly what is required in order to have part in the salvation of Christ. Not only is it necessary to believe, but thou must also confess with thy mouth, i.e., make public confession that Jesus is Lord (the literal order) of the universe, and therefore truly God. This means a public confession of Christ’s Divinity, such as was required before Baptism (Acts 8:37; Acts 16:31). Further, besides believing and confessing the Incarnation of the Son of God, it is necessary to believe in His Resurrection from the dead. Paul mentions these two mysteries because they are the principal ones of Christianity, those on which all others depend. If he speaks first of external, and then of internal faith, it is only because he is following the order of Moses’ words, which speak of the mouth first, and secondly of the heart.

10. For, with the heart, we believe unto justice; but, with the mouth, confession is made unto salvation.

St. Paul here returns to the natural order and speaks first of internal belief, and then of external profession of faith.

With the heart, etc., i.e., the internal act of faith is the beginning and foundation of justification.

We believe. More literally, Faith is formed (πιστευεται), i.e., a state of faith is formed on our part, as the present tense indicates. The phrase  εις δικαιοσυνην, and not εις δικαιωσιν, shows that one attains real justice, and not a mere declaration of it, just as salvation will be really possessed (Lagrange).

Confession . . . unto salvation, i.e., salvation will follow upon our faith and justification, provided we persevere to the end of life in the justification we have received, and do not fail to make at times external profession of our faith. Again the present tense, ομολογειται, marks a state of justice, and not a mere act, on man’s part. Of course, justification, if ever lost through mortal sin, can always be regained by a proper use of the Sacrament of Penance.

11. For the scripture saith: Whosoever believeth in him, shall not be confounded.

The New Dispensation is one of faith which gives to all the same rights to salvation. This doctrine of faith, however, is not new, having been already announced by the scripture, i.e., by Isaiah 28:16. St. Paul had previously (Rom 9:33) quoted these same words of the Prophet; but here he adds the word πας, whosoever, to the text of Isaiah, in order to express more clearly the universality of salvation through faith.

In him, in the context of Isaias, refers to the “corner-stone,” which was a figure of Christ.

Shall not be confounded, because through faith in Christ we are reconciled with God and have a firm hope of attaining salvation.

12. For there is no distinction of the Jew and the Greek: for the same is Lord oyer all, rich unto all that call upon him.

There is no distinction, etc. The Apostle had used the same argument, only more openly, to prove the universality of salvation in Rom 3:29. There he said God was the God of the Gentiles as well as the Jews; here he insists that both have the same Saviour.

Lord means Jesus Christ (Cornely, Lagrange, etc.), and not God the Creator, as some of the older commentators thought, because there is question here of faith in Christ. Jesus is the κυριος παντων, Lord over all, as in Acts 10:36; Philip 2:11.

Rich unto all, because by His death Christ has provided an infinite treasury of merits (Eph 3:8) which He holds at the disposition of all, on condition that they call upon him, i.e., that they believe in Him with their hearts and confess Him with their mouth (verse 10).

13. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord, shall be saved.

St. Paul appeals to the Prophet Joel 2:32 (3:2 in NAB and other translations) to prove that whosoever will call upon the name of Jesus shall be saved. The same text from Joel was quoted by St. Peter in his sermon to the faithful on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:21). The Apostle applies to Christ what Joel had said of Yahweh, which is a clear proof of the Divinity of Jesus.

THE JEWS REFUSED TO BELIEVE IN THE GOSPEL

A Summary of Romans 10:14-21~In these verses St. Paul shows all that God has done to lead the Jews to the faith. He has shown already (verse 3) that they misunderstood the justice of God, although it was easily within their reach to grasp and understand, if only they would have had faith (verses 6-13). Now he goes on to prove that they could have made this act of faith, and that if they have not done so, it is manifestly their own fault. Faith should be supported by authorized preaching, and such preaching faith has had, as Isaias proves. But all have not believed. Yet they have heard and understood, and it is their own fault if they have not believed. Cf. St. Chrys., Lagr., h. 1.

14. How then shall they call on him, in whom they have not believed? Or how shall they believe him, of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear, without a preacher?
15. And how shall they preach unless they be sent, as it is written: How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things!

In the preceding verse it was said that invocation of the name of Christ was necessary for salvation. But to invoke a person, it is first necessary to believe in him; and to believe, one must first have learned. One learns through preaching, provided the preaching be duly authorized and reliable. These conditions being presupposed, there is no reason for not believing.

Preaching, therefore, is the ordinary means of learning the truths of faith; but it must be done by those who have the proper authority and the right to preach : there are many pseudo-apostles and pseudo-prophets (2 Cor. 11:13; Titus 1:11). God, of course, is free to make known the truths of salvation otherwise than through preaching, if He wishes, but that would be something out of His ordinary way of acting.

How shall they believe him, etc. The Vulgate querm non audierunt, corresponding to the Greek ου ουκ ηκουσαν (hou ouk ekousan = whom they have not heard), would seem to suggest that those who had not heard Christ could not believe in Him. But ηκουσαν (ekousan = heard) with the genitive sometimes means in classic Greek to hear of or about a person (Cornely). Our English translation, “of whom they have not heard,” is therefore correct, and the Vulgate should read, de quo non audierunt. At any rate, the fact that very few who were then living had seen Christ or heard Him was an argument for the necessity of duly authorized preachers, Apostles, envoys of Christ.

Unless they be sent, i.e., by God, either directly, as was St. Paul himself, or indirectly, through the authority constituted by God, as are all those who receive their commission from the Apostolic body and Church instituted and empowered by Christ. This Apostolate which, through its preaching, is to convert souls to Christ, had already been foretold by Isaias 52:7. The citation is more according to the Hebrew than the LXX. The Prophet’s words refer literally to the messengers who announced the fall of Babylon and the return of the Jews from captivity; but in their mystical sense, as here used by St. Paul, they have reference to the preachers of the Gospel.

Of them that preach the gospel of peace is an addition to Isaias which is not found in the best Greek MSS.

Glad tidings, etc., literally refers to the announcement made by the messengers of whom Isaias spoke, but figuratively, to the preachers of the Gospel of Christ.

16. But all do not obey the gospel. For Isaias saith: Lord, who hath believed our report?

Although the Gospel was preached, St. Paul here affirms that generally, especially by the Jews, it was not obeyed. He says all do not, etc.; better, “all have not,” etc., simply to soften, as much as possible, the sad truth of Jewish indifference and obduracy. This deplorable fact of disobedience to the Gospel and to the preaching of the Apostles was foretold by Isaias 53:1, whom St. Paul cites almost literally according to the LXX. The word Lord is added to the citation. Isaias was about to describe the passion and humiliation of the future Messiah, and he cried out full of anguish and fear, who will believe what I am going to announce? How few they were who afterwards did believe in the Messiah we are told by St. John 12:
37, 38.

Our report literally means “our hearing,” i.e., our preaching, what they heard from us.

To conform to the Greek the obediunt of the Vulgate ought to be
obedierunt.

17. Faith then cometh by hearing; and hearing by the word of Christ.

As said above (verse 14), faith cometh by hearing, i.e., by preaching, according to God’s ordinary Providence, and hearing,
i.e., preaching, comes by the word of Christ, i.e., by the commission and mandate of Christ given to the Apostles and their successors (Cornely), or by the word revealed through Christ (Lagr.).

18. But I say: Have they not heard? Yes, verily, their sound hath gone forth into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the whole world.

St. Paul anticipates an objection or excuse on the part of the Jews. Will they, i.e., the Jews, say they have not heard the preaching of the Gospel? That they certainly have heard it, he proceeds to prove by a quotation from Psalm 19:4, cited according to the LXX. The Psalmist is speaking of the glory of God being declared by the heavens; and St. Paul, accommodating the text to his purpose (Cornely, Zahn, etc.), says that as the heavens declare everywhere the glory of the Creator, so has the preaching of the Gospel been heard everywhere in the world. Hence there is no excuse for the incredulity of the Jews.
All the earth and the ends of the whole world are obviously hyperboles, used to express a great truth. The Apostle merely wishes to say that the Gospel was then widely known in the Roman world, and so could not be unknown to the Jews (cf. Acts 1:8).

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 10:9-18

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 17, 2015

This post opens with a brief summary analysis of chapter 10, followed by Fr. MacEvilly’s notes on Verses 9-18. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the scripture he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS OF ROMANS CHAPTER 10

In this chapter, the Apostle continues the subject of the rejection of the Jews, and dilates on the cause of this rejection, as assigned, verse 30, of the preceding; but in order to remove the harshness involved in the announcement of the rejection of the Jews, he expresses his affectionate feelings towards them, and his anxious desire for their salvation (verse 1). He bears testimony to their zeal—a zeal, however, which missed its true object, Christ (1–4). Having referred (verse 3), to the system of justice at variance with the true justice of God, which the Jews vainly endeavoured to establish, he proves from Moses the superiority of the justice by faith (5–8), and he reduces the duties of a Christian life to two heads, faith in the heart and its external profession, both of which, of course, accompanied with the other conditions which faith prescribes, confer justice on all men, without distinction of Jew or Gentile (8–13).

He takes occasion to justify his mission of preaching among the Gentiles, since otherwise they would not become partakers of the blessings which God had designed for them as well as for the Jews (14–16). He shows, from Moses and Isaias, that God had determined to call the Gentiles, and to reject the Jews, on account of their obstinacy and resistance to his gracious calls and invitations (17–21).

Rom 10:9 For if thou confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in thy heart that God hath raised him up from the dead, thou shalt be saved. ‎

If, then, you believe in your heart, and confess with your mouth, that Jesus Christ our Lord is Son of God, and became incarnate and suffered for us, and that God raised him from the dead, you shall obtain the salvation of true justice here, and of eternal glory hereafter.

All you require is, to believe in our Lord Jesus Christ, who descended from heaven, became man, and died for us, and believe in his resurrection, or “that God hath raised him,” &c., and profess the same externally, and you “shall be saved,” i.e., you shall obtain not temporal life—the reward of the law—but life eternal. The raising of Christ from the dead being an act of power, is, by appropriation, ascribed to God the Father. These are the leading articles of our faith. Of course, under them are included the other articles of faith necessary to be believed, together with faith, hope, charity, without which, man, although he have true faith, cannot be saved. The words, “thou shalt be saved,” like the attribute of every affirmative proposition, are understood restrictively. Instead, then, of going up to heaven to bring down Christ, or descending to the abyss, all you require is, to believe in your heart and profess with your mouth, that Christ did come, &c., and “you shall be saved,” the other conditions, the principal of which is the performance of good works, being observed.

Romans 10:10 For, with the heart, we believe unto justice: but, with the mouth, confession is made unto salvation. ‎

For, the interior assent and faith of the heart is required to obtain justice, but the external profession of the same faith is necessary to preserve this justice and obtain final salvation.

The external profession of our faith is, sometimes, an imperative duty, under pain of mortal sin, and, therefore, necessary to preserve justice and sanctifying grace.

Rom 10:11 For the scripture saith: Whosoever believeth in him shall not be confounded. ‎

This is clearly proved from Scripture (Isaias 38:16), Whosoever believeth in him shall not be confounded, or frustrated in his expectations.

He proves the truth of his assertion (verse 9), viz., that by believing in Christ, whosoever thou art, “thou shalt be saved.” This he shows from the prophet Isaias (28.) Whosoever believeth in him shall not be confounded, i.e., frustrated in his expectation. Hence, he is here treating of faith to which hope is annexed—(See 9:33). The prophecy of Isaias, just quoted, regards the Messiah, since by “him” is meant the Messiah.

Rom 10:12 For there is no distinction of the Jew and the Greek: for the same is Lord over all, rich unto all that call upon him. ‎

By saying, “whosoever,” the Scripture removes all distinction, whether of Jew or Gentile, without exception; for God is equally the Supreme Lord of all, and the riches of his bounty are held out to all who sincerely invoke Jesus as the Messiah.

The Apostle assigns a reason, why no distinction should be made between Jew and Gentile; because God is equally the Supreme Lord of all, and “rich,” i.e., bountiful towards all who invoke him, and profess him to be the Son of God.

Rom 10:13 For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. ‎

We have in proof of this, the testimony of the prophet Joel (2:32), Whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord (Jesus) shall be saved.

He proves from the prophet (Joel 2) that God is bountiful to all, without exception, who call on his name, “Whosoever shall call,” etc. We have the authority of St. Peter (Acts, 2:17–37), that these words of Joel are to be referred to our Lord Jesus Christ.

Rom 10:14 How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? Or how shall they believe him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher? ‎

But since we must believe in God before invoking his name, how can men invoke God in whom they have not believed? or, how shall they be able to believe in him, unless they first hear of him? or, how shall they be able to hear of him, unless there be some person to make him known to them by preaching?

The Apostle takes occasion, from the general promises of God regarding Jew and Gentile alike, to justify his own mission and preaching among the Gentiles. He shows the necessity of preaching, in order that they might be partakers in the rich blessings which God has in store for them; he proceeds, step by step, from invocation to faith; from faith to hearing; from hearing to preaching; from preaching to mission; so that, in a certain sense, mission becomes, in this summary recapitulation, the basis of our salvation; since, without this mission on the part of God, imparted to his preachers, the people shall not have true faith, nor the true worship of God. From this the Apostle leaves it to be inferred, that, as God is rich in bounty towards the Gentiles, and since, for the communication of his blessings, preaching the gospel with a legitimate mission is necessary, he himself has preached to the Gentiles by the orders and commission of God himself.

There are many Divines who, from this passage, undertake to prove the necessity of having a doctrine propounded by the true Church, before it can become a point even of divine faith; in other words, they assert that the proposition of a doctrine by the true Church enters the formal object of faith. At all events, we can clearly infer from this passage, that the preaching through a legitimate ministry is the ordinary means of imparting the true faith, and that God will not permanently impart his sanction to a system of faith promulgated by an uncommissioned teacher. In fact, it is clearly inferable that in the ordinary Providence of God, a divine mission and appointment are necessary for the due effect of preaching the Gospel; for, it is on this supposition that the Apostle’s argument in favour of his own mission among the Gentiles is based. God might, undoubtedly, by interior inspirations, teach an infidel the necessary truths of faith. He might also, if he pleased, aid, by the interior enlightenment of grace, the preaching of an heretical minister propounding, in a particular instance, revealed truth, so as to beget faith in the hearers; but, this is not in accordance with his ordinary Providence; nor can we admit for an instant, that he would give permanent stability to any system of faith emanating from such a teacher.

Rom 10:15 And how shall they preach unless they be sent, as it is written: How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things? ‎

But how shall heralds of salvation preach him with permanent success, unless they are his own appointed messengers receiving a commission from him? It is of those preachers only, sent by divine commission, that we are to understand the words of the prophet (Isaias, 52:7): How joyous the approach of those preachers of the gospel, who announce to us peace, reconciliation with God, and all good things conducive to salvation!

As it is written (Isaias 52:7), “How beautiful.” i.e., such a mission from God is necessary, in order that the teachers would be the true heralds of salvation, in whom shall be verified the words of the prophet, “How beautiful,” &c. These words, in their literal and primary signification, refer to the messengers who first brought the news of the return of the Jews from the Babylonish captivity, and in their mystical signification, to the preachers of the Gospel. The Apostle here follows, with the omission of the unimportant words, (upon the mountains), the Hebrew version, which runs thus: “How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, and that preacheth peace; of him that sheweth forth good,” &c. The quotation differs widely from the Septuagint, which most probably had been corrupted in this passage of Isaias.

Rom 10:16 But all do not obey the gospel. For Isaias saith: Lord, who hath believed our report? ‎

But, although the advent of the heralds of salvation is thus pleasing; still, all men do not obey the gospel. This, however, is not to be wondered at; since, it was predicted by Isaias, who, in the person of the Apostle, says, “how few have believed and obeyed the words they heard from us.”

“Our report,” in Greek, τῇ ἀκουῇ ἡμῶν, our hearing, or the doctrine heard from our preaching. He answers the objection by showing that this obduracy was predicted by Isaias.

Rom 10:17 Faith then cometh by hearing; and hearing by the word of Christ. ‎

From the foregoing (14–19), I conclude that faith comes from hearing, and the hearing, from which faith springs, comes from preaching the word of God.

This is the point which he wished to establish (verse 14), “How shall they believe him, of whom they have not heard? “And hearing by the word of Christ.” In the ordinary Greek, ῤήματος θεου, the word of God. The chief MSS. have, Χριστου, “of Christ.”

Rom 10:18 But I say: Have they not heard? Yes, verily: Their sound hath gone forth into all the earth: and their words unto the ends of the whole world.

But I ask, is it from want of hearing of the word of God that men have not embraced it? Certainly not. For, as the heavens, by their silent eloquence, proclaim the attributes and perfections of God throughout the entire extent of creation; so has the voice of the Apostles and of the heralds of divine truth been heard all over the globe.

Their sound hath gone forth,” &c. These words are quoted by the Apostle from Psalm 18:5, according to the Septuagint version of the Psalms. In their primary and literal signification, they refer to the heavenly bodies, and the order and harmony of the visible creation, which so eloquently proclaim the glory and attributes of God: but in their mystical signification, they refer to the preaching of the Apostles. In this sense they are to be regarded as a prophecy in the text of David, which prophecy, St. Paul announces, was about to be accomplished, and shall be gradually fulfilled before the end of the world; and hence, the Apostle, as well as the Psalmist, employs words of the past tense, “hath gone forth,” on account of the certainty of its accomplishment; or it might be said, that the prediction was really accomplished in the days of the Apostle; because the Apostles and the first heralds of salvation had announced the Gospel in the principal places of the world, from which the fame of their preaching had been heard throughout the rest of the globe. It is to be observed, that in this, and the following verse, 19, the Apostle meets a twofold objection, which the Jews might allege in excuse for their incredulity, viz., that they did not hear the Gospel, or were ignorant of its communication to the Gentiles, and so might be excused from embracing it. The first is answered in this verse., and the second, next verse, where Moses, their own favourite legislator, predicts the call of the Gentiles.—(Beelen).

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Commentaries for the First Sunday of Advent, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 17, 2015

FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT, YEAR C

READINGS AND MISSAL:

Mass Readings in the NABRE Translation. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Used in most English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON TODAY’S FIRST READING: Jer 33:14-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Jeremiah 33:14-16.

Word-Sunday Notes on Jeremiah 33:14-16.

Pending. My Brief Notes on Jeremiah.

Catechism Links: 156214; 215; 397; 1063; 2465-2470.The Catechism makes no direct reference to Jer 33:14-16, however, since the text speaks of God fulfilling his covenant promises to David, I think the following passages on God’s truthfulness and fidelity to his covenant and promises (and what that means for us) might be helpful.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 25:4-5, 8-9, 10, 14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 25. Very brief.

Father Berry’s Introduction and Notes to Psalm 25.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 25.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 25.

My Notes on Psalm 25:4-5, 8-9, 10, 14. Actually on 1-14.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 25.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

Father Callan’s Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2. Includes verse 11.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

Word-Sunday Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2.

Catechism Links: The catechism doesn’t employ 1 Th 3:12-4:2 but the following links might be useful:

#826. Love (charity) Essential for Holiness. “Abound in love…to be blameless in holiness.” (1 Th 3:12-13).

#815. Love/Charity as Bond of Faith & Apostolic Succession. “As you have received from us” (1 Th 4:1).

#s 897-913. The Lay Faithful’s Mission. “How you should conduct yourselves to please God” (1 Th 4:1).

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

My Notes on Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

Homilist’s Catechism on Luke 21:25-28, 34-36.

GENERAL RESOURCES: sites that usually dea with the readings as a whole. Commentaries on individual readings are listed further below.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

Scripture Speaks.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: Happy New Year: the First Sunday of Advent!. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma reflects on the readings.

Christian Leadership Center: Preaching the Lectionary for 1st Advent. An ecumenical site.

PODCASTS:

Father Mike’s Introduction to Jeremiah.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Jeremiah 30-33.

Father Mike’s Introduction to 1 Thessalonians. On Philippians, 1 & 2 Thessalonians.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of 1 Thessalonians 3:12-4:2. starts as the beginning of chapter 3.

Father Mike’s Introduction to Luke.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on Luke 21-22. Click on POD icon or the direct download link.

St Martha’s Podcast on the 1st Sunday of Advent Readings. Looks at all the readings.

(1) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: Look to the Son of Man. Noted speaker and theologian.

(2) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: The End of the World as We Know It.

(3) Father Robert Barron’s Homily Podcast: The Second Coming.

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Commentaries for the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 4, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings in the NABRE Translation. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Used in most English speaking countries. Scroll down. I’ve seen conflicting reports concerning whether or not it is the JB, or the NJB that is currently used in most English speaking nations. If anyone knows of a Bishop’s Conference site that has a set up similar to the US Bishop’s site linked above (but using the JB or NJB), please let me know.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Daniel 7:13-14.

St Jerome’s Notes on Daniel 7:13-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Daniel 7:13-14. Includes 9-10.

Word-Sunday Notes on Daniel 7:13-14.

Homilist’s Catechism on Daniel 7:13-14.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 93.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 93.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 93.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 93.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 93.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 1:5-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 1:5-8.

Pending (maybe): My Notes on Revelation 1:5-8.

Word-Sunday Notes on Revelation 1:5-8.

Homilist’s Catechism on Revelation 1:5-8.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 18:33b-37.

My Notes on Today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37).

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37). Includes 38.

St Thomas’ Lecture on Today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37). Scroll down to lecture 6.

Word-Sunday Notes on John 18:33-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37).

Homilist’s Catechism on Today’s Gospel (Jn 18:33-37).

GENERAL RESOURCES: sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Word Sunday. The readings in both and literal translation, notes on the text, podcast, children’s reading.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Pope John Paul II’s Homily for Christ the King. 1997.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Angelus Address on Christ the King. 2005.

Sacred Page Blog: Viva Cristo Rey!. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma reflects on the readings.

PODCASTS:

The Church and the Mystery of the Kingdom. Some helpful insights into Daniel and the question of the Kingdom.

Father Mike’s Introduction to the Book of Daniel.

(1) St Martha’s Parish Podcast on Revelation. Scroll down slightly. This series is less in depth than the second one listed below.

(2) St Martha’s Parish Podcast Study of Revelation. Scroll down and click on “class 2.”

EWTN’s Study of John. Listen to episode 11.

St Martha’s Parish Podcast Study of John. Listen to session 10.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on John 17-18. Click on POD icon or the direct download link.

Franciscan Sisters’ Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings.

St Martha’s Bible Study for Christ the King. Looks at all the readings.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief. Does good job of highlighting major theme(s). Text available.

(1) Fr. Robert Barron’s Podcast: There’s a New King in Town. From 2009.

(2) Fr. Robert Barron’s Podcast: True Kingship.

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Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 4, 2015

THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

Last Week’s Commentaries.

MONDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Maccabees 1:10-15, 41-43, 54-57, 562-63.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

My Notes on Psalm 119:53, 61, 134, 150, 155, 158.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 18:35-43.

Redemptoris Missio on Luke 18:35-43.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 18:35-43.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 18:35-43.

TUESDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Maccabees 6:18-31.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 3.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 3.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 3.

My Notes on Psalm 3.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 19:1-10.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 19:1-10.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 19:1-10.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 19:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 19:1-10.

WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Maccabees 7:1, 20-31.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 17.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 17.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 17.

My Notes on Psalm 17:1m 5-6, 8, 15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 19:11-28.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 19:11-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 19:11-28.

THURSDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Maccabees 2:15-29.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 50.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 50.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 19:41-44.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 19:41-44.

Haydock Bible Commentary on Luke 19:41044. On 41-47.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 19:41-44.

FRIDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Maccabees 4:36-7, 52-59.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 19:45-48.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 19:45-48.

SATURDAY OF THE THIRTY-THIRD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Maccabees 6:1-13.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 9.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 9.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 20:27-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 20:27-40.

THIRTY-FOURTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B
THE SOLEMNITY OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST, KING OF THE UNIVERSE, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.

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Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 3, 2015

THIRTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Wisdom 1:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 1 :1-7.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 139.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 139.

Pope Jon Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 139.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 17:1-6.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 17:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 17:1-6.

TUESDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Wisdom 2:23-3:9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 2:23-3:9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’s Lecture on Psalm 34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 17:7-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 17:7-10.

WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Wisdom 6:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 6:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 82.

Father McSwiney’s Introduction to Psalm 82.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 17:11-19.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 17:11-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 17:11-19.

St Augustine’s Homily on Luke 17:11-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 17:11-19.

THURSDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 7:22b-8:1.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 17:20-25.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 17:20-25. On 20-37, incorporating both today and tomorrow’s gospel readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 17:20-25.

FRIDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 13:1-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 19.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 17:26-37.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 17:26-37. On verses 20-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 17:26-37.

SATURDAY OF THE THIRTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Wisdom 18:14-16, 19:6-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 18:1-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 18:1-8.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Luke 18:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 18:1-8.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 18:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 18:1-8.

THIRTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for he Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time.

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Commentaries for the Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 3, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings in the NABRE Translation. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Used in most English speaking countries. Scroll down. I’ve seen conflicting reports concerning whether or not it is the JB, or the NJB that is currently used in most English speaking nations. If anyone knows of a Bishop’s Conference site that has a set up similar to the US Bishop’s site linked above (but using the JB or NJB), please let me know.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Daniel 12:1-3.

St Augustine on Daniel 12:1-3.

St Jerome on Daniel 12:1-3.

Word-Sunday Notes on Daniel 12:1-3.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Daniel 12:1-3.

Homilist’s Catechism on Daniel 12:1-3.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 16.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 16.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 16.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 16.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 16. Ps 15 in Vulgate.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 16.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 16.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrew 10:11-14, 18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

Pending: Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

Word-Sunday Notes on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18. On 1-18. You will have to scroll down from the previous lecture as the link to this specific lecture is broken.

Homilist’s Catechism on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 13:24-32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 13:24-32. On 21-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 13:24-32.

Origen on Today’s Gospel. Brief. Focuses on the idea of the Son of Man coming in great power.

Word-Sunday Notes on Mark 13:24-32.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 13:24-32.

Speaking of Scripture Blog on Mark 13:24-32. Excerpt from Dr. Mary Healy’s Commentary on Mark, part of the new CATHOLIC COMMENTARY ON SACRED SCRIPTURE series.

GENERAL RESOURCES: sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

Scripture Speaks. I’ve linked to the archive. This Sunday’s post not yet available.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma’s reflections on the readings and psalm.

PODCASTS:

Father Francis Martin’s Reflection on the Readings. 4 videos, each approximately 15 minutes long. The last three deal with the readings, the first is introductory. The link is time sensitive.

(1) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on Daniel. Introduction.

(2) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on Hebrews. Introduction to James and Hebrews.

(3) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on Mark. Introduction.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief. Does good job of highlighting the major theme(s). Text available.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on Hebrews 10:11-14, 18. Begins at verse 5.

EWTN’s Podcast Study of Mark 13:24-32. Listen to episode 12 which begins with the end of chapter 12 (the widow’s mite) and then proceeds to chapter 13.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings.

(1) Father Rober Barron’s Podcast Homily: Good News of the Apocalypse. Noted speaker and theologian.

(2) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: The Last Battle.

(3) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: The End of the World.

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Commentaries for the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 2, 2015

THIRTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings in the NABRE Translation. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Used in most English speaking countries. Scroll down.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: 1 Kings 17:10-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Kings 17:10-16.

Word-Sunday Notes on 1 Kings 17:10-16.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 Kings 17:10-16.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Psalm 146:7, 8-9, 9-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 146.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Hebrews 9:24-28.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 9:24-28.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 9:24-28.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Hebrews 9:24-28. On 23-28.

Word-Sunday Notes on Hebrews 9:24-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 9:24-28.

Homilist’s Catechism on Hebrews 9:24-28.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 12:38-44.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:38-44.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

Word-Sunday Notes on Mark 12:38-44.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 12:38-44.

GENERAL RESOURCES: sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: A Lesson on Faith. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma’s reflections on the readings and psalm.

PODCASTS:

St Martha’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at the readings in some detail.

(1) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on 1 Kings. Introduction to 1 & 2 Kings.

(2) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on Hebrews. Introduction to James and Hebrews.

(3) Father Mike’s Bible Study Podcast on Mark. Introduction.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief. Does good job of highlighting major theme(s). text available.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings.

(1) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: A Tale of Two Widows. Noted speaker and theologian.

(2) Father Robert Barron’s Podcast Homily: Christ the High Priest.

Posted in Bible, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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