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Archive for April, 2016

Commentaries for the Sixth Week of Easter

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

Year B: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

Year C: Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter.

MONDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 16:11-15.

FatherMacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 16:11-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 16:11-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 149.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:26-16:4.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:26-16:4.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:26-16:4.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:26-16:4.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:26-16:4.

TUESDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 16:22-34.

Father Macevilly’s Commentary on Acts 16:22-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 16:22-34.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 138.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 138.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 138.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 138.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 138.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:5-11. Actually on 5-17.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 16:5-11. On verses 8-11, actually.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:5-11.

WEDNESDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 17:15, 22-18:1.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 17:15, 22-18:1.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 17:15, 22-18:1.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 148.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 148.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 148.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 148.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 148.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:12-15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 16:12-15.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 16:12-15.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 16:12-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:12-15.

SOLEMNITY OF THE ASCENSION OF THE LORD
OR
THURSDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER
Note: In some places the celebration of the Ascension is moved to the following Sunday. The first link is to commentaries for the Ascension, followed by commentaries for the normal weekday reading.

COMMENTARIES FOR THE SOLEMNITY OF THE ASCENSION.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 18:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 18:1-8.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 16:16-20. On 16-22.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:16-20. On 16-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:16-20.

Aquinas’ Sermon Notes on John 16:20.

St John Chrysostom’s Homily on the Gospel. This homily is on verse 16-33.

The following six homilies are from Father Johann Evangelist Zollner (1828-1901), a famed preacher in his day. All are on John 16:16-22.

The Farewell Discourse Of Our LordHomily on the Gospel.

Christian HopeDogmatic homily on the Gospel.

The Three Feasts Falling In Easter Time. Liturical homily.

The Travail Of The Woman In Childbirth A Figure Of The Miseries Of Human LifeA symbolic exposition of the Gospel textScroll down page slightly.

The Efficacy Of TearsA moral exposition of the Gospel text. Scroll down page.

The Folly Of The Children Of The World And The Wisdom Of The Children Of God. Another moral exposition of the Gospel.  Scroll down page slightly.

FRIDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 18:9-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 18:9-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 47.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 47.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 47.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 47.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 47.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:20-23.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 16:20-23. On verses 19-24.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 16:20-23. Includes vs. 19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:20-23.

SATURDAY OF THE SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary Acts 18:23-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 18:23-28.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 47.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 47.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 47.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 47.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 47.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 16:23-28. On 23-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:23-28.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 16:23-28. Read Lectures 6-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:23-28.

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER
Note: We are in Year A
For those celebrating the Ascension today, see above, the first link under Thursday.

Year A: Commentaries for the Seventh Sunday of Easter.

Year B: Commentaries for the Seventh Sunday of Easter.

Year C: Commentaries for the Seventh Sunday of Easter.

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Commentaries for the Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR C

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Scroll down. Used in most English speaking countries. For some reason the site has the Gospel reading before the second reading.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 7:55-60.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 7:55-60. Actually on 51-60.

fATHER MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 7:55-60.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 7:55-60.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 7:55-60.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 97:1-2, 6, 7, 9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97. Whole psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97. Whole psalm.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 97. Whole psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20.

Pending (maybe): My Notes on Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20.

Homilist’s Catechism on Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 17:20-26.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 17:20-26.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 17:20-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 17:20-26.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 17:20-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 17:20-26.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 17:20-26.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Pending.

PODCASTS AND VIDEOS:

ON THE READINGS AS A WHOLE:

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Link is to the archive page. the study become available on Thursday. Looks at the readings and responsorial.

St Martha’s Parish Sunday Bible Study. Looks at the readings in some detail.

ON THE FIRST READING:

EWTN’s Gospel of the Holy Spirit. Listen to episode 4.

St Catherine of Siena’s Parish Bible Study of Acts of Apostles. Video on chapters 6-7.

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast Bible Study of Acts of Apostles. Listen to episode 6.

ON THE SECOND READING:

Institute of Catholic Culture on Revelation. A three part introductory overview of the book.

St Martha’s Podcast Study of Revelation. On chapters 20-22.

A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On chapters 20-22.

ON THE GOSPEL:

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John’s Gospel.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast of John’s Gospel. Listen to the episode on 15:1-18:2.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY HELPS: Pending.

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Commentaries for the Seventh Sunday of Easter, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR B

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Reading in the New American Bible. Used in the U.S.A.

Mass Readings in the New Jerusalem Bible. Scroll down slightly. The NJB is the translation for the readings used in most English speaking countries.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 1:15-17, 20a, 20c-26.

Father Callan’s Commentary on the First Reading.

Navarre Bible Commentary on the First Reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Ps 103:1-2, 11-12, 19-20.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 John 4:11-16.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on the Second Reading.

St Augustine’s Lecture on the Second Reading. On verses 12-16.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on the Second Reading.

Navarre Bible Commentary on the Second Reading. Includes vv. 17-18.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: John 17:11b-19.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

NOTES, COMMENTARIES, BLOG POSTS ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL: 

Apostolic Succession and Church Government. A blog post on the Sunday readings by Catholic biblical scholar, Dr. John Bergsma.

Word Sunday. Notes on the readings along with other stuff.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Bible Study. Notes on the readings used in their parish study.

CHILDREN AND TEEN RESOURCES:

Proclaiming the Faith. Grade school level.

PODCASTS:

St Martha’s PodcastStudy of the Sunday Readings. Looks at all the readings in some detail.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast.

Fr. McBride’s Podcast on Acts. Listen to episode 1.

St Irenaeus Ministries’ Podcast Study of John 17. Actually begins with John 15:9 and continues  to the end of chapter 17. Click on the POD icon or “direct download” link.

HOMILIES, HOMILY NOTES, HOMILY SUGGESTIONS:

Torch. Dominican website. Text.

Augustinian Friends.Text.

Sunday Soundbites. Audio and text available. Brief.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines. Text. Gives themes of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 18:1-8

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

Act 18:1 After these things, departing from Athens, he came to Corinth.

Corinth, the capital of Achaia. For description of (see the Introduction to Corinthians). Here is what Fr. MacEvilly wrote in that introduction: CORINTH was a wealthy city, situated on the isthmus that divides the Morea from continental Greece. It was destroyed by Mummius (A.C. 146) by order of the Roman Senate, and a hundred years after restored by Julius Cæsar (A.C. 44). It was constituted by Augustus the capital of Achaia (A. 27). In the time of St. Paul, it more than recovered its former opulence and splendour. Owing to its favourable situation for commerce—having a ready communication with the East and West, by means of its ports on the Ægean and Ionian seas—it became the grand emporium in these parts. It abounded in riches, and their attendant vices, of every description. There were two leading vices, however, for which Corinth was particularly remarkable, viz., pride and impurity; the latter of which is often permitted by a jealous God, as the appropriate punishment of the former. The dissoluteness of the Corinthian women became, accordingly, proverbial throughout the rest of Greece; and the loathsome vice of impurity was, to a certain extent, publicly sanctioned—Venus being one of the tutelary deities of the city. We are informed by Strabo (lib. 9), and by Herodotus (in Clio), that the temple of this goddess at Corinth was wealthy enough to support more than one thousand courtezans devoted to infamy and prostitution. Such was the wretched state, such the deplorable spiritual condition of this city, on the occasion of the Apostle’s first visit (A.D. 52), which is recorded (Acts 18). He remained there eighteen months, and founded a Church composed partly of Jewish, but principally of Gentile converts.

Act 18:2 And finding a certain Jew, named Aquila, born in Pontus, lately come from Italy, with Priscilla his wife (because that Claudius had commanded all Jews to depart from Rome), he came to them.

“Aquila.” There was no distinction made in the public acts of the Empire, between Jews and Christians. Christians, therefore, were comprised in the Edict of Claudius. Whether Aquila was converted at Rome, and professing the Christian religion when St. Paul came to Corinth, or was converted by St. Paul, is disputed (Vide Beelen). The exact date of the Edict of Claudius (who reigned from A.D. 41-54) is unknown. A number of scholars date the event circa 49, but this is debated. The extent of the expulsion is also debated. Luke says “all Jews” were commanded to depart, but “all” in the Mediterranean world was often used as a hyperbole (= many, most). How long the edict was in force is also unknown.

Act 18:3 And because he was of the same trade, he remained with them and wrought. (Now they were tentmakers by trade.)

“Same trade.” Tent-making, manufacturing tents from skins or cloth. The Apostle gloried in labouring for his livelihood (Acts 20:34; 2 Thess. 3:9, 10). He was brought up at the feet of Gamaliel, and originally destined for the legal profession. The Jews made it a custom to have their children taught some useful trade, as a part of their education. This was inculcated by the Rabbins.

“Tent-making.” Making portable tents out of cloth or skins was a pretty remunerative trade in the East.

Act 18:4 And he reasoned in the synagogue every sabbath, bringing in the name of the Lord Jesus. And he persuaded the Jews and the Greeks.

“Reasoned,” discoursed, incidentally “bringing in the name of Jesus.” It was only after the arrival of Silas and Timothy, he entered boldly into discussion regarding our Lord (v. 5).

“Persuaded.” Strove to persuade. “Greeks,” Proselytes of the gate, who frequented the synagogue.

Act 18:5 And when Silas and Timothy were come from Macedonia, Paul was earnest in preaching, testifying to the Jews that Jesus is the Christ.

“Silas,” &c. (17:15), “earnest;” was animated by their presence to preach to the Jews, “that Jesus is the Christ” their long-expected Messiah.

Very likely, Silas and Timothy brought him from Macedonia some pecuniary aid (2 Cor. 11:8, 9) so that now he needed not to labour for his support and could devote his undivided attention and all his time to preaching and the work of the ministry.

Act 18:6 But they gainsaying and blaspheming, he shook his garments and said to them: Your blood be upon your own heads: I am clean. From henceforth I will go unto the Gentiles.

“Blaspheming,” Uttering opprobrious language against our Lord, vilifying him, speaking of him scornfully and contemptuously.

“Shook his garments.” A symbolical action, conveying that he gave up all communication with them; had nothing in common with them.

“Blood.” Destruction and ruin “on your own heads.” “I am clear.” I have done my part.

“Henceforth.” This was peculiar and exceptional treatment of the Corinthian Jews. For, we find that he afterwards laboured for the conversion of his Jewish brethren elesewhere.

Act 18:7 And departing thence, he entered into the house of a certain man, named Titus Justus, one that worshipped God, whose house was adjoining to the synagogue.

Thence,” the synagogue, “entered into the house,” &c., which served for the purpose of instruction, which he gave before in the synagogue. He lodged with Aquila.

“Worshipped God.” This Titus Justus was a proselyte.

Act 18:8 And Crispus, the ruler of the synagogue, believed in the Lord, with all his house. And many of the Corinthians hearing, believed and were baptized.

Fr. MacEvilly offers no note on this verse. The following is taken from the CBSC, an Anglican commentary: This “Crispus” is alluded to, 1 Cor 1:14, as one of the few whom St Paul himself baptized. His previous distinguished position among the Jews, and the conversion of his whole family, would make him noticeable among the Christian converts. There may have been more than one synagogue in Corinth. In Acts 18:17 we read of Sosthenes, the ruler of the synagogue. But it is quite possible that this man may have been appointed immediately after the conversion of Crispus, and may have been desirous to shew his zeal against the Christian teachers by laying an immediate information against Paul before the proconsul.

“and many of the Corinthians … were baptized”. St Paul mentions that he himself only baptized (in addition to Crispus) Gaius and the household of Stephanas (see 1 Cor 1:14-16). But Silas and Timothy were now by his side and would care for the admission of the new converts to baptism.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:1-8

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

This post opens with Fr. MacEvilly’s summary analysis of 1 Corinthians 15, followed by his commentary on verses 1-8. Text in purple represents his paraphrasing of the scripture he is commenting on.

A SUMMARY ANALYSIS OF 1 CORINTHIANS CHAPTER 15

The Apostle devotes this, almost concluding chapter, to arrest the progress of an error which teas broached at Corinth regarding the fundamental dogma of the resurrection of the body. Among the Corinthian converts, many, it would seem, were deeply imbued, before embracing the faith, with the scepticism of the Sadducees, and certain doctrines of Pagan philosophy, both equally subversive of the resurrection as well of the soul as of the body. Others among them had adopted the tenets of those who denied the resurrection of the body only. Having embraced the faith at an advanced period of life, they could hardly divest themselves of the false notions which they had for a long period of time entertained. In this chapter, the Apostle proves the resurrection of the body, and, as the basis of this proof, he establishes, on several grounds, the fundamental dogma of the Resurrection of Christ, from which he infers the general resurrection of all men. He first reminds the Corinthians of the gospel preached by himself among them, the leading heads of which were, Christ’s death for our sins, his burial and resurrection (1–4). He proves the truth of Christ’s Resurrection from several testimonies and arguments (4–12). From the Resurrection of Christ, he infers the general resurrection of all: such being the connection between both, that if we rise not again, neither has Christ arisen. After pointing out the absurd consequences which the denial of the Resurrection of Christ would involve (12–22), and having explained the order in which the dead shall arise (22–24), he introduces a new argument in favour of the general resurrection, grounded on the total subjection of all things, death included, to Christ (24–29). He advances new arguments to prove our future resurrection, and shows the origin of the unbelief of the Corinthians—viz., evil communications (34). In the next place, he replies to the principal difficulties against the resurrection (34–42). After describing the qualities of glorified bodies (42–46), and after showing that as we are now earthly, we shall then be heavenly, he exhorts us to conform to our heavenly model (46–50). He points out the mode of the resurrection, and exhorts the Corinthians to the performance of good works.

1Co 15:1 Now I make known unto you, brethren, the gospel which I preached to you, which also you have received and wherein you stand.

I wish, brethren, to recall to your minds the gospel, or the truths of faith, which I preached to you, which you received and embraced, and in which you have hitherto persevered.

“Now I make known unto you,” &c. This he says, for the purpose of showing that in the instructions which he is about giving them, he is only reminding them of those matters which they already heard himself preach when among them.

1Co 15:2 By which also you are saved, if you hold fast after what manner I preached unto you, unless you have believed in vain.

In the belief and profession of which you have received that initial salvation of justice which places you in the way of consummate salvation in the life to come, provided you adhere to it, according as I have preached it; otherwise, you shall have believed in vain.

“By which you also are saved,” refers to salvation by grace here, which shall lead to consumate salvation hereafter. “If ye hold fast,” &c. This he adds in consequence of the metaphorical interpretation put by some of them on the words of our Redeemer regarding the Resurrection, as if they meant a rising out of sin and ignorance and leading a new life. Some interpreters include from the words—“I preached to you,” verse 1, to “after what manner,” &c., verse 2, in a parenthesis; and interpret the passage thus:—I wish to recall to your minds the gospel which I preached unto you (…) and “after what manner I preached unto you,” i.e., by what arguments I establish this preaching. From thus reminding you, you know if you have adhered to what I preached; for, if you do not persevere in it, you have believed to no effect. The construction and interpretation in the Paraphrase are, however, the more probable. “Unless,” has the meaning of otherwise.

1Co 15:3 For I delivered unto you first of all, which I also received: how that Christ died for our sins, according to the scriptures:

I taught you among the first and principal articles of faith, which I myself received, as I did my gospel from the revelation of Jesus Christ, that Christ died for our sins, as has been predicted regarding him in the Scriptures.

“How that Christ died.” This, he adds, to introduce the subject of the resurrection; since there would be no resurrection unless Christ died. “According to the Scripture.” This he mentions for the purpose of removing the scandal which the death of Christ was apt to beget in the minds of the weak and unstable.

1Co 15:4 And that he was buried: and that he rose again according to the scriptures:

And that he was buried (in testimony of his being really dead), and that he rose again on the third day, as was prefigured and predicted in Scripture.

“That he was buried.” These words are employed for the reason already assigned regarding Christ’s death. “The third day.” When the Evangelists say he was buried three days, they mean three partial days, viz., a part of the first day, the entire second day, and a part of the third. Hence, no contradiction between them and St. Paul here. The first argument adduced in favour of the resurrection is the testimony of the Scriptures.

1Co 15:5 And that he was seen by Cephas, and after that by the eleven.

My next argument in proof of his resurrection is the testimony of St. Peter, the Prince of the Apostles, to whom he appeared in the first instance, after having previously appeared to the women, and after him, to the eleven Apostles.

The next argument is the testimony of St. Peter, and the “eleven.” Judas was dead; and hence, only eleven of the apostolic college remained. In Greek, we read, ειτα τοις δωὃεκα, and after that, by the twelve. This reading is susceptible of explanation, although only eleven were present by a figure common to all languages, according to which a number of persons acting in concert and forming a body of colleagues, are designated by the number of which the body was originally composed—although at the time that a particular act was ascribed to them, some of the members may have been absent (v.g.) the same form of expression is used in reference to the Decemvirs. It is said the Decemviri did, what was only the act of a lesser number than ten; so it is also with regard to the “twelve” here.—(See also Gospel of St. John, 20:24). It is likely the Apostle refers here to the second apparition of our Redeemer to his Apostles on the octave of Easter day, when the “eleven” were present.—(John, 20:26). The Apostle does not, in his account of Christ’s several apparitions, follow the order of the Evangelists; for the first apparition was made to the women. Peter was the first of the men that he appeared to. After this, happened the apparition to the disciples going to Emmaus, to wich no allusion is made here by the Apostle.

1Co 15:6 Then was he seen by more than five hundred brethren at once: of whom many remain until this present, and some are fallen asleep.

Afterwards, he was seen by more than five hundred disciples, assembled together, of whom many are still alive to attest the fact; others have slept in the Lord.

This probably refers to the apparition to his disciples in Galilee. The Evangelist does not mention the number of persons present on that occasion. St. Matthew (28:16, 17), says: “the eleven” saw him, he but does not say how many more besides.

1Co 15:7 After that, he was seen by James: then by all the apostles.

Afterwards, he was seen by James (surnamed the Just); and after that by all the Apostles and Disciples at his Ascension.

“James,” the venerable first Bishop of Jerusalem, whose testimony was of the greatest weight with the Jews. This apparition is not recorded by any of the Evangelists. Hence, it must refer to some private one with which St. James was favoured, distinct from those made to him, in common with the other Apostles.

1Co 15:8 And last of all, he was seen also by me, as by one born out of due tine.

And last of all, he was seen by me, who am, as it were, an abortion, and deserving only of contempt, compared with the other Apostles.

“As one born out of due time,” or abortion, the meaning of the Greek word, εκτρώμα. This word contains no allusion to the late period of his call to the Apostleship. It is expressive rather of his unworthiness and imperfection, which is conveyed in the idea of an abortive offspring, as appears from following verse. Christ was seen by St. Paul at his conversion.—(Acts, 9:3).

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Commentaries for the Feast of Saints Philip and James, Apostles

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 30, 2016

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:1-8. On 1-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:1-8. On 1-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 19.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 19.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19. Psalm 18 in the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate. Latin and English translation are side by side.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19. This Psalm is numbered as 18 in the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:6-14.

Aquinas’ Lecture on John 14:6-14. Read Lectures 2 & 3.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 14:6-14.

St Augustine’s Tractates on John 14:6-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14: 6-14.

Pope Benedict XVI on Saint Philip.

Pope Benedict XVI on Saint James the Lesser.

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Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 27, 2016

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Mass Readings in the NJB Translation. Scroll down. Used in most English speaking countries. For some reason the site has the Gospel reading before the second reading.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

My Notes on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

Word-Sunday Notes on Acts 15:1-2, 22-29.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 67.

Augustine’s Notes On Psalm 67. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary On Psalm 67. On entire psalm.

Lection Divina Commentary on Psalm 67.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 67.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

My Notes on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23 .

Word-Sunday Notes on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 21:10-14, 22-23.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 14:23-29.

St Augustine’s Commentary On John 14:23-29 .

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 14:23-29.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 14.  Scroll UP slightly to find the beginning of Lecture 6, which starts at 14:22.  Read through Lectures 6-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 14:23-29.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 14:23-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 14:23-29.

Word -Sunday Notes on John 14:23-29.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Sites which offer commentaries, reflections, summaries,etc., on one or more of the readings in a single post.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines.  Gives the theme(s) of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Wednesday Word.  It’s about the Sunday readings, but the document is posted on Wednesday, hence the name. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

Sacred Page Blog: Reflection on the readings by Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

Living Space. Commentary/reflections on the readings.

Glancing Thoughts: Brief reflection on the first reading from philosopher Eleanore Stump.

The Gospel in its Historical Cultural Context. Briefly examines the gospel reading in light of first century Mediterranean culture.

Thoughts From The Early Church. Excerpt on the Gospel from St Bernard of Clairvaux.

Scripture In Depth. Succinct summary of the readings and their relation to one another.

PODCASTS:

Franciscan Sisters Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings in some detail.This Sunday’s episode should be available sometime Thursday.

EWTN’s Gospel of the Holy Spirit (On Acts 15). Listen to episode 8.

St Catherine of Siena’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostle. Video on chapters 13-15.

Institute of Catholic Culture’s Podcast Study of Acts of Apostles. Listen to part 8 on chapters 10-15.

Institute of Catholic Culture on Revelation. A three part introductory overview of the book.

St Martha’s Podcast Study of Revelation. On chapters 20-22.

Franciscan Sisters Study of Revelation 21-22.

Part 1: A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On 20-22.

Part 2: A Catholic Study of the Book of Revelation. On 20-22.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of John’s Gospel. On chapters 13-14. Click on the POD icon or the direct download link.

Franciscan Sisters Study of John 13:10-14:31.

 

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Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 10

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

THE JEWS MISUNDERSTOOD THE JUSTICE OF GOD
A Summary of Romans 10:1-4

The Apostle protests again (cf. Rom 9:1-3) to the Romans his sincere affection and sympathy for his fellow-Jews. Their failure, he says, is due, not to lack of zeal, but to the error of insisting on their own false notion in preference to the true notion of justice. The theme is the same as in Rom 9:30-33; but, while there he was speaking of Israel stumbling at the stumbling-block, he is here entering into a psychological analysis of the Jewish mind which, in observing the Law, came short of Christ, the end of the Law.

Rom 10:1. Brethren, the will of my heart, indeed, and my prayer to God, is for them unto salvation.

Here St. Paul gives renewed assurance of his abiding interest in the salvation of his fellow-Jews. And yet, their incredulity has put a chasm between him and them, as is evident from the fact that he speaks of them in the third person, while addressing the Romans in the second person as brethren.

The will of my heart (ευδοκια = eudokia), i.e., my strong desire (St. Chrysostom), or my inclination, purpose (Lagrange). The particle μεν (men), not followed by δε (de), is most probably to be used in its adverbial sense of confirmation, meaning here, certainly translated above as “indeed” (Lagrange).

Rom 10:2. For I bear them witness, that they have a zeal of God, but not according to knowledge.

I bear them witness, etc. The Apostle, who had been a zealous Pharisee, and had himself been eaten up with zeal for God (Gal. 1:14; Acts 22:3), was well able to testify to the zeal of his fellow-Jews. They certainly were most assiduous in studying the law of God, but they failed to understand God’s designs. They were at great pains to promote the honor and glory of God, but they were little concerned to scrutinize their own conceptions to see what God’s honor and glory might consist in. Hence their ignorance was culpable. Thus St. Paul (1 Tim. 1:13) blamed his own ignorance, and St. Peter (Acts 3:17) said that the Jews crucified Christ through ignorance.

A zeal of God, i.e., a zeal for the cause of God.

Knowledge, i.e., a profound understanding (επιγνωσιν = epignosin) . Cf. Eph. 1:17; 4:13; Col. 1:9-10; etc.

Rom 10:3. For they, not knowing the justice of God, and seeking to establish their own, have not submitted themselves to the justice of God.

They not knowing, through their own culpable ignorance, the justice of God, i.e., the system of gratuitous justification by means of grace through faith in Christ to come, as the Scriptures had announced (Rom 3:21; 41-25). To receive this grace of justification it was needful that the Jews should recognize themselves as sinners, even like the Gentiles; but they were persuaded that it was necessary for the honor of God to establish their own, i.e., to defend as true justice their own idea of justification, based on the external observance of the Law, and the result of their own personal efforts. Considering this frame of mind we can readily understand how they would not submit themselves to “the justice of God,” i.e., the justification which God communicates to men, which is a gratuitous gift of God dependent upon faith in Christ. Cf. Philip, 3:9.

Rom 10:4. For the end of the law is Christ, unto justice to every one that believeth.

For (γαρ = gar) explains why the submission of the preceding verse was required.

The end, etc., i.e., the purpose of the Mosaic Law was to lead to Christ. All the precepts and ceremonies of the Law were types of Christian mysteries, intended to prefigure Christ and to prepare man for His coming. How far astray, then, were the Jews in trying to establish a system of justification independent of faith in Christ! But Fr. Lagrange and others understand τελος νομου (= telos nomou, “end of the law”) here to mean not that the Law was ordained and led to Christ, or that Christ was its perfection and fulfillment; but that, since the justice of God is now given in Christ, the Law has come to an end, as an instrument of justice, and has no further purpose (cf. also Gal. 3:25). Hence in the first explanation τελος (telos) would mean purpose; in the second, end, or term. We see no reason why both explanations cannot stand.

Law, although without the article in Greek, means the Mosaic Law, as is clear from the context (Lagrange, Cornely, etc.), and not law in general (Weiss, Zahn, etc.).

That believeth. To obtain justification and salvation faith in Christ has at all times been the indispensable means,—in Christ to come under the Old Law, and in Christ already come under the New Dispensation.

THE JUSTICE OF LAW AND THE JUSTICE OF FAITH
A Summary of
Romans 10:5-13

The Apostle speaks in these verses, first of the justice of the Law, as contrasted with the justice of faith ; he then shows that this latter is also necessary for the salvation of the Jews; there is no distinction, both Jew and Gentile must be saved by faith.

Rom 10:5. For Moses wrote, that the justice which is of the law, the man that shall do it, shall live by it

The Apostle quotes Moses (Lev. 18:5, according to the LXX) to show the difference between the justice of the Law and that of faith. If a man is able to obtain the justice of the Law, he will have as his reward, temporal, and even eternal life; but this justice is very difficult, being beyond man’s natural strength.

The justice … of the law, i.e., the justice which resulted from an observance of all the precepts of the Mosaic Law.

The man that shall do it, etc., i.e., the man that is able to do such a difficult thing.

Shall live by it. To the observers of the Law there was promised a life of temporal blessings (Deut. 28:2-13; 30:9-10), and also life eternal (Matt. 19:17; Luke 10:25-28). But to obtain this latter it was necessary to observe, not only externally, but also internally, all the precepts of the Law; and, in particular, to love God and have faith in Christ to come (Deut. 6:5; Matt. 22:36; Rom. 2:13; 4:11)—a task utterly beyond the powers of fallen human nature unaided by grace (Rom 7:22-25). This grace, however, which the Law could not provide, would be given by God in virtue of faith in Christ to come. The Jews erroneously thought they could keep the Law by their own mere natural strength, and thereby obtain the rewards promised.

Wrote should be “writeth,” and scripsit of the Vulgate should be scribit, to conform to the Greek.

Rom 10:6. But the justice which is of faith, speaketh thus: Say not in thy heart, Who shall ascend into heaven? that is, to bring Christ down;
Rom 10:7. Or who shall descend into the deep? that is, to bring up Christ again from the dead.

To show that the justice of faith, unlike that of the Law, is not difficult to obtain St. Paul here personifies it, and makes it address man in the words of Deut. 30:11-14. These words, in their primary and literal meaning, refer to the Law of Moses, the precepts of which were not difficult to understand; but in their accommodated sense, here made use of by the Apostle (Calmet, Beelen, Cornely, etc.), they relate to the justice of faith,— to Christian faith, which is comparatively easy to obtain, involving no such insurmountable difficulty as ascending into heaven, to bring down Christ, the object of faith ; or descending into the deep, i.e., into the grave, to bring up Christ again from the dead, i.e., to believe that Christ, the object of our faith, descended there. As Moses told the Hebrews that it was not necessary “to ascend into heaven,” or “go over the sea” in search of the Law which was indeed very near to them; so here the Apostle, accommodating the words of the Prophet, says that, since Christ descended from heaven and became incarnate once, and likewise once died, was buried and rose again for our salvation, it is not necessary that we should try either to ascend into heaven or descend to the abode of the dead to work out the redemption which Christ already has wrought for us. Since, therefore, the two fundamental mysteries of our redemption, the Incarnation and the Resurrection, have already been accomplished for us, our justification is easy, provided we have proper faith in God through His incarnate and risen Son.

The words of Deut. 30:13 (“which of us can cross the sea”) are here somewhat modified by St. Paul (“who shall ascend into the deep”), in order to render more vivid the contrast between heaven and the abyss, and better to accommodate the words of Moses to Christ’s burial and Resurrection from the dead.

Rom 10:8. But what saith the scripture? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart. This is the word of faith, which we preach.

The word scripture is wanting in Greek, and is considered a gloss. This verse is the positive complement of the thought of the preceding verses. Justice personified is still speaking. It is not necessary to seek salvation afar off, it is very near. It consists in a word which must be received by faith. As Moses said the word, i.e., the Law, was nigh and easy to understand; so, says St. Paul, it is with the word of faith, which we preach, i.e., the Gospel truths that are necessary for salvation. These words, through the preaching of the Apostles, are carried to all in such a way that all may have them in their mouth and in their heart, without the necessity of long journeys or grave fatigue.

In the Vulgate scriptura should be omitted; justitia, understood from verse 6, is the subject of dicit.

Rom 10:9. For if thou confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and believe in thy heart that God hath raised him up from the dead, thou shalt be saved

The Apostle explains yet more clearly what is required in order to have part in the salvation of Christ. Not only is it necessary to believe, but thou must also confess with thy mouth, i.e., make public confession that Jesus is Lord (the literal order) of the universe, and therefore truly God. This means a public confession of Christ’s Divinity, such as was required before Baptism (Acts 8:37; 16:31). Further, besides believing and confessing the Incarnation of the Son of God, it is necessary to believe in His Resurrection from the dead. Paul mentions these two mysteries because they are the principal ones of Christianity, those on which all others depend. If he speaks first of external, and then of internal faith, it is only because he is following the order of Moses’ words, which speak of the mouth first, and secondly of the heart.

Rom 10:10. For, with the heart, we believe unto justice; but, with the mouth, confession is made unto salvation.

St. Paul here returns to the natural order and speaks first of internal belief, and then of external profession of faith.

With the heart, etc., i.e., the internal act of faith is the beginning and foundation of justification.

We believe. More literally, Faith is formed (πιστευεται = pisteuetai), i.e., a state of faith is formed on our part, as the present tense indicates. The phrase εις δικαιοσυνην (eis dikaiosynen), and not εις δικαιοσιη (eis dikaiosin), shows that one attains real justice, and not a mere declaration of it, just as salvation will be really possessed (Lagrange).

Confession . . . unto salvation, i.e., salvation will follow upon our faith and justification, provided we persevere to the end of life in the justification we have received, and do not fail to make at times external profession of our faith. Again the present tense, ομολογειται (homologeitai = “confession”), marks a state of justice, and not a mere act, on man’s part. Of course, justification, if ever lost through mortal sin, can always be regained by a proper use of the Sacrament of Penance.

Rom 10:11. For the scripture saith: Whosoever believeth in him, shall not be confounded.

The New Dispensation is one of faith which gives to all the same rights to salvation. This doctrine of faith, however, is not new, having been already announced by the scripture, i.e., by Isaiah 28:16. St. Paul had previously (Rom 9:33) quoted these same words of the Prophet; but here he adds the word πας (= pas), whosoever, to the text of Isaias, in order to express more clearly the universality of salvation through faith.

In him, in the context of Isaias, refers to the “corner-stone,” which was a figure of Christ.

Shall not be confounded, because through faith in Christ we are reconciled with God and have a firm hope of attaining salvation.

Rom 10:12. For there is no distinction of the Jew and the Greek: for the same is Lord over all, rich unto all that call upon him.

There is no distinction, etc. The Apostle had used the same argument, only more openly, to prove the universality of salvation in Rom 3:29. There he said God was the God of the Gentiles as well as the Jews; here he insists that both have the same Saviour. 

Lord means Jesus Christ (Comely, Lagr., etc.), and not God the Creator, as some of the older commentators thought, because there is question here of faith in Christ. Jesus is the κυριος παντων (= kyrios panton, “Lord over all”), as in Acts 10:36; Philip, 2:11. 

Rich unto all, because by His death Christ has provided an infinite treasury of merits (Eph. 3:8) which He holds at the disposition of all, on condition that they call upon him, i.e., that they believe in Him with their hearts and confess Him with their mouth (verse 10).

Rom 10:13. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord, shall be saved.

St. Paul appeals to the Prophet Joel 2:32 to prove that whosoever will call upon the name of Jesus shall be saved. The same text from Joel was quoted by St. Peter in his sermon to the faithful on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:21). The Apostle applies to Christ what Joel had said of Yahweh, which is a clear proof of the Divinity of Jesus.

THE JEWS REFUSED TO BELIEVE IN THE GOSPELA Summary of Romans 10:14-21

In these verses St. Paul shows all that God has done to lead the Jews to the faith. He has shown already (verse 3) that they misunderstood the justice of God, although it was easily within their reach to grasp and understand, if only they would have had faith (verses 6-13). Now he goes on to prove that they could have made this act of faith, and that if they have not done so, it is manifestly their own fault. Faith should be supported by authorized preaching, and such preaching faith has had, as Isaias proves. But all have not believed. Yet they have heard and understood, and it is their own fault if they have not believed. Cf. St. Chrys., Lagr., h. 1. 

Rom 10:14. How then shall they call on him, in whom they have not believed? Or how shall they believe him, of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear, without a preacher?
Rom 10:15. And how shall they preach unless they be sent, as it is written: How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, of them that bring glad tidings of good things!

In the preceding verse it was said that invocation of the name of Christ was necessary for salvation. But to invoke a person, it is first necessary to believe in him; and to believe, one must first have learned. One learns through preaching, provided the preaching be duly authorized and reliable. These conditions being presupposed, there is no reason for not believing.

Preaching, therefore, is the ordinary means of learning the truths of faith; but it must be done by those who have the proper authority and the right to preach : there are many pseudo-apostles and pseudo-prophets (2 Cor. 11:13; Titus 1:11). God, of course, is free to make known the truths of salvation otherwise than through preaching, if He wishes, but that would be something out of His ordinary way of acting.

How shall they believe him, etc. The Vulgate querm non audierunt, corresponding to the Greek ου ουκ ηκουσαν (hou ouk ekousan = “whom they have not heard”), would seem to suggest that those who had not heard Christ could not believe in Him. But ηκουσαν (ekousan = “heard”) with the genitive sometimes means in classic Greek to hear of or about a person (Cornely). Our English translation, “of whom they have not heard,” is therefore correct, and the Vulgate should read, de quo non audierunt. At any rate, the fact that very few who were then living had seen Christ or heard Him was an argument for the necessity of duly authorized preachers, Apostles, envoys of Christ.

Unless they be sent, i.e., by God, either directly, as was St. Paul himself, or indirectly, through the authority constituted by God, as are all those who receive their commission from the Apostolic body and Church instituted and empowered by Christ. This Apostolate which, through its preaching, is to convert souls to Christ, had already been foretold by Isaias 52:7. The citation is more according to the Hebrew than the LXX. The Prophet’s words refer literally to the messengers who announced the fall of Babylon and the return of the Jews from captivity; but in their mystical sense, as here used by St. Paul, they have reference to the preachers of the Gospel. 

Of them that preach the gospel of peace is an addition to Isaias which is not found in the best Greek MSS. 

Glad tidings, etc., literally refers to the announcement made by the messengers of whom Isaias spoke, but figuratively, to the preachers of the Gospel of Christ. 

Rom 10:16. But all do not obey the gospel. For Isaias saith: Lord, who hath believed our report? 

Although the Gospel was preached, St. Paul here affirms that generally, especially by the Jews, it was not obeyed. He says all do not, etc.; better, “all have not,” etc., simply to soften, as much as possible, the sad truth of Jewish indifference and obduracy. This deplorable fact of disobedience to the Gospel and to the preaching of the Apostles was foretold by Isaias 53:1, whom St. Paul cites almost literally according to the LXX. The word Lord is added to the citation. Isaias was about to describe the passion and humiliation of the future Messiah, and he cried out full of anguish and fear, who will believe what I am going to announce? How few they were who afterwards did believe in the Messiah we are told by St. John 12:
37, 38. 

Our report literally means “our hearing,” i.e., our preaching, what they heard from us.

To conform to the Greek the obediunt of the Vulgate ought to be obedierunt. 

Rom 10:17. Faith then cometh by hearing; and hearing by the word of Christ.

As said above (verse 14), faith cometh by hearing, i.e., by preaching, according to God’s ordinary Providence, and hearing, i.e., preaching, comes by the word of Christ, i.e., by the commission and mandate of Christ given to the Apostles and their successors (Cornely), or by the word revealed through Christ (Lagr.).

Rom 10:18. But I say: Have they not heard? Yes, verily, their sound hath gone forth into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the whole world.

St. Paul anticipates an objection or excuse on the part of the Jews. Will they, i.e., the Jews, say they have not heard the preaching of the Gospel? That they certainly have heard it, he proceeds to prove by a quotation from Psalm 19:4, cited according to the LXX. The Psalmist is speaking of the glory of God being declared by the heavens; and St. Paul, accommodating the text to his purpose (Cornely, Zahn, etc.), says that as the heavens declare everywhere the glory of the Creator, so has the preaching of the Gospel been heard everywhere in the world. Hence there is no excuse for the incredulity of the Jews. 

All the earth and the ends of the whole world are obviously hyperboles, used to express a great truth. The Apostle merely wishes to say that the Gospel was then widely known in the Roman world, and so could not be unknown to the Jews (cf. Acts 1:8).

Rom 10:19. But I say: Hath not Israel known? First, Moses saith: I will provoke you to jealousy by that which is not a nation; by a foolish nation I will anger you.

Another objection is forestalled and refuted by the Apostle. It having been proved that the Jews had heard the Gospel preaching, could it be that they would say that they did not understand it? That is impossible; for the Apostle adduces certain texts from the Old Testament (Deut. 32:21) in which it had been foretold that the Gentiles, far less prepared than the Jews, would understand and embrace the faith ; from which it follows that the Jews could not plead an obscurity in the preaching of the Gospel that would excuse their failure to understand.

Hath not Israel known? i.e., have not the Jews understood (ουκ εγνω = ouk egno)? There is question here of the Jews understanding that which they had heard, namely, the Gospel.

First, Moses, i.e., God through Moses first, in order of time among the inspired writers, threatened the Jews on account of their obstinacy in not understanding, that is, in rendering homage to “that which was no god” (Deut. 32:21), i.e., to an idol; and He told them that He would incite them “to jealousy and anger” by bestowing first temporal, and later spiritual blessings upon that which is not a nation, upon a foolish nation, i.e., the Gentiles. The pagans were called “not a nation,” i.e., an inferior nation, as compared with the religious and moral standard of the Jews. They were looked upon as “a foolish nation,” i.e., as almost incapable of understanding the things of God; and yet they understood the preaching of the Gospel which the Jews, with all their superior privileges and divine assistances, did not grasp and obey. The words of Moses found their entire fulfillment when the Jews were rejected and the spiritual blessings of the Messiah were conferred upon the Gentiles.

Rom 10:20. But Isaias is bold, and saith: I was found by them that did not seek me: I appeared openly to them that asked not after me.

St. Paul now cites Isaiah 65:1, whose words clarify the obscurity that might lurk in Moses’ words of the preceding verse. God is speaking through the Prophet.

Isaias is bold, i.e., outspoken, without regard for the sensibilities and prejudices of his fellow-Jews.

I was found, etc., i.e., I permitted myself to be discovered, through the preaching of the Gospel, by the Gentiles that did not seek me, i.e., that were wrapped in the darkness of idolatry, and that consequently neither knew Me nor adored Me.

I appeared openly, through the same preaching of the Gospel, to them, i.e., to the Gentiles, that cared not for Me, nor desired My revelation. How much more, therefore, should the Jews have known and understood the Gospel message! In their failure to do this how great was their culpability!

Rom 10:21. But to Israel he saith: All the day long have I spread my hands to a people that believeth not, and contradicteth me.

Isaiah 65:2 is here cited directly against the Jews. It was said in verses 19, 20 that if a people that did not know God have recognized Him in His manifestations, much more should Israel have known and understood His messages. And why has Israel not recognized and understood the revelation of God in the Gospel? Simply because it was incredulous and resisted God’s proffered gifts, because of its continual disobedience and opposition to God. On the part of God there were invitations the most tender; on the part of Israel, obstinate refusal. St. Paul is not retracting what he said in Romans 9 about the designs of God ; he is picturing here the problem under the aspect of the responsibility incurred by human wills deaf to the call of God (Lagrange).

To Israel. The preposition “to,” προς (= pros), according to modern interpreters should rather be concerning, with regard to. “To,” however, sufficiently renders the meaning of the Vulgate ad and of the Greek προς (pros), in the present instance.

All the day, etc., i.e., God at all times, like a loving father, stretched out His arms and desired to embrace Israel, but in vain.

To a people, etc., i.e., to Israel, incredulous and rebellious. Throughout its history Israel was unfaithful and rebellious to the law and will of God, but its obstinacy and disobedience became most manifest when it rejected the Messiah and His Gospel. To itself alone, therefore, is due Israel’s exclusion from the Messianic kingdom. Cf. Matt 23:37; Luke 11:15; John 8:48; 9:10, etc.

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Video: The New Commandment and the New Creation (Fifth Sunday of Easter)

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

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The New Commandment and the New Creation: The Lectionary Readings Explained (The Fifth Sunday of Easter)

Posted by Dim Bulb on April 24, 2016

In this video, Dr. Pitre discusses Jesus’ new commandment and the new creation as found in the readings for the Fifth Sunday of Easter in Year C.

Source: The New Commandment and the New Creation: The Lectionary Readings Explained (The Fifth Sunday of Easter)

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