The Divine Lamp

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Archive for May, 2017

Suggestions for Homilies, Bible Studies, Discussion Groups for the 12th Sunday of Ordinary Time, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 29, 2017

Readings and Catechism Links: 

First Reading Jer 20:10–13 See CCC 2584.
Response Ps 69:14c
Gospel Acclamation John 15:26b, 27a

 

Some Basic Suggestions: 
Note: Scripture passages below contained within red, rounded brackets (…) indicate a reference from today’s readings.

1. As always, the Psalm (Ps 69:8–10, 14, 17, 33-35) and it’s response (Ps 69:14c) suggest themes for the first and Gospel readings. The first part of the response (“Lord, in your great love”) relates well to the Lord’s care and protection of the faithful (Jer 20:11, 12b, 13b; Mt 10:29-31). The second part of the antiphon (“answer me”) relates to the theme of prayer (Jer 20:12b, 13b). The gospel reading itself doesn’t relate to prayer, but the entire missionary discourse of Mt 10 is introduced with a reference to it, and this can be easily worked into a homily or brought up for discussion in a bible study (see Mt 9:35-39) .

2. God is our Father (Mt 10:29) and as such loves and cares for us (see Ps 103:13; CCC 268, 270), CCC 218-221, 733) even when friends (Jer 20:10) and family may not because of our faith and commitment to God and the Gospel (see Jer 9:3-5; 11:18-19, 21; Mt 10:34-36; Lk 4:16-30). This could help prepare for next Sunday’s Gospel which is on Mt 10:37-42. See also God as Father, Mother, and Husband: CCC 219Isa 49:14-15; 66:13; Ps 131:2-3; Hos 11:1-4; Jer 3:4-19.

3. Terror (Jer 20:10), fear (Mt 10:26) and intimidation and how to cope with it by trusting in God’s love (Ps 69:14, 17, 34).

4. Evil, suffering, and persecution as tests of faith. God’s faithful can be and are tested by God (Jer 20:12; CCC 164) but such trials are of great value (Mt 10:32), especially when accompanied by prayer (Ps 69:14).  See also James 1:2-8; see also Heb 12:1-13.

5. Christ is the reason why believers are persecuted, insulted, ostracized, etc., (Mt 10:17-25; Mt 5:11-12) He is also a model to be imitated when such things occur (see 1 Pet 2:20-25 with 1 Pet 3:8-4:1 and 1 Pet 4:12-16). Jeremiah’s experience in these matters prefigured Christ. Zeal for God’s house (Ps 69:10) nearly consumed Jeremiah (Jer 26:1-19, cf. Jer 7:1-15), and did consume Jesus (Jn 2:13-22; cf. Mt 26:59-62; Mk 14:57-59). Here one could talk about the Church as a temple (2 Cor 6:16 Eph 2:20-22; 1 Tim 3:15 1 Pet 2:5); or the the believer’s bodies as temples (1 Cor 3:16; 6:19), and relate how commitment to the Church, the Gospel and righteous living in faith can lead to opposition (see 2 Tim 3:12; 1 Pet 4:4)

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Commentaries for the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, A, B & C
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 12:1-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 33.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 33.

St Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:1-5.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 7:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:1-5.

TUESDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 13:2, 5-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 15.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 15.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 15. Ps 14 in Thomas’ Psalter.

St Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 15.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 15:1-12, 17-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 105.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:15-20.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

THURSDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: in 2017 this day falls on June 29, the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul. The first two links below relate to it; the remaining links are for the regular Mass of the day.

2017. Vigil: Commentaries for the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul.

2017. Mass During the Day: Commentaries for the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 16:1-12, 15-16.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 106).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:21-29.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

FRIDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 17:1, 9-10, 15-22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 128.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Pending: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 8:1-4.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

SATURDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 18:1-15.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Responsorial.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Update: Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Update: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Pending: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

THIRTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

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Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

READINGS:

NABRE. Used in the USA.

NJB. Use in most English speaking countries.

THEMES:

Suggestions for Homilies, Bible Study and Discussion Groups.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines.

Lector Works. “A series of thoughts about the lectionary readings of the day, as an oral proclamation within the church’s public prayer, and how the writer would want to have them declared and received effectively.” Identifies a “central point” for each reading and a suggested “message for our assembly.”

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: 2 Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a.

Haydock Bible Commentary on 2 [4] Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a. Following the LXX and Vulgate this commentary designates 2 Kings as 4 Kings. In these translations 1 & 2 Samuel were designated as 1 & 2 Kings, while what we today call 1 & 2 Kings were called 3 & 4 Kings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a.

Cambridge Bible Commentary. Protestant. The excerpt has no theological issues to concern Catholics.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 89:2-3, 16-17, 18-19

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 89.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 89.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 6:3-4, 8-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 10:37-42

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-11

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

This post begins with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief analysis of all of chapter 6, followed by his notes on verses 3-11. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the verses he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS OF ROMANS 6

In this chapter, the Apostle answers an objection to which his doctrine in the preceding (verse 20), might give rise (1). From the very rite of baptism, he shows that we should no longer commit sin; on the contrary, we should lead a new life of grace; for the rite of immersion practised in his time in baptism, was a type of our death to sin, and the egress from the waters of baptism was a type of our spiritual resurrection, both of which were effected, as well as signified, by the sacrament of baptism; and both had the death and resurrection of Christ for models (2–9). He next shows, from the very nature of Christ’s death, which took place but once, and of his resurrection, which was the entrance to an immortal life, that we, too, after his example, should persevere in a life of grace (9–11). He exhorts to a life of sanctity (11–20). He points out the present and future fruits of a life of sin and of a life of grace.

Rom 6:3  Know you not that all we who are baptized in Christ Jesus are baptized in his death?

For that we are dead to sin, you may clearly see, by calling to mind what you already know, viz., that when we are baptized in the name and by the authority of Jesus Christ, we are baptized into the likeness and representation of his death.

He now proves that they are dead to sin, since by being “baptized in Christ Jesus,” in the Greek, εἰς Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν, into Christ Jesus, i.e., by professing ourselves followers of Christ in the rite of baptism. In the Codex Vaticanus, the word “Jesus” is wanting, it simply is, “baptized unto Christ.” “Are baptized in his death”; in the Greek, εἰς τὸν θάνατον, into his death, i.e., into the likeness and representation of his death. So that his death on the cross would be represented by our death to sin, of which the baptism by immersion—the form of baptism in use in the time of the Apostle—was a significant type; and this death to sin on our part is effected by baptism, since, according to the doctrine of St. Thomas, the sacraments operate what they signify.

Rom 6:4  For we are buried together with him by baptism into death: that, as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we also may walk in newness of life.

For, in order vividly to represent his death, we have been buried with him in the baptismal rite of immersion. So that as Christ has been resuscitated from the grave by the glorious operation of his Father’s power, we also, emerging from the baptismal waters, would lead a new life, as he did after his resurrection, and continue perseveringly in it.

He shows how our spiritual death to sin is signified by baptism. For, our immersion in baptism is a type of our burial, and, consequently, of our death to sin, of which his death on the cross was the model. “For we are buried together with him by baptism,” his burial, and, consequently, his death, being the model of our burial and death to sin, signified by our immersion in the waters of baptism. In all the Greek copies we have, οὖν, therefore, instead of “for.” “Into death,” to represent his death, which must precede burial. “That as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father,” i.e., by the glorious operation of the Father’s power, to enter on a new and immortal life, we too, after emerging from the waters of baptism, which is a type of our spiritual resurrection, would, like Christ, risen from the grave—our resuscitated model—enter on a new and holy life. As the death of Christ is the model of our death to sin, so is his resurrection from the tomb the model of our spiritual resurrection, and both signified by the rite of baptism, then conferred by immersion.

Rom 6:5  For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection.

For, if, like young shoots, we have been engrafted on him by baptism, so as to represent, by our death to sin, his death on the cross, we shall certainly, for a like reason, be engrafted also unto the likeness of his resurrection, which will be effected by our leading a new life of grace, after the model of his glorious and immortal life.

He shows why we should walk in the newness of life, or become assimilated to Christ in his resurrection; for, our assimilation to him in our spiritual death, was not to rest there. Baptism not only represented and effected our spiritual death to sin—for this was but one spiritual effect signified and caused by baptism—but it also signified and effected our resurrection to a new life, in which we are to live after the model of Christ resuscitated from the grave. Our death to sin was the precursor of our new life of grace. Hence, if we die with Christ, with much greater reason shall we rise with him. “Planted together with him,” συμφυτοι γεγοναμεν; there is allusion in these words to the grafting of young shoots on the stock of another tree: Christ is the stock of the true and faithful vine on which we must be engrafted, to die with him to sin, and to live with him to grace, as the young graft participates in all the vicissitudes of the stock on which it is inserted. The nutriment we derive from our insertion on him, will not be merely confined to our dying to sin; it is intended to produce in us the fruits of a new and spiritual life.

Rom 6:6  Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin may be destroyed, to the end that we may serve sin no longer.

We should die to sin and live a new life of grace, if we consider that in baptism, our old man, i.e., the corruption of nature, which we inherited from Adam, is crucified with Christ, so that the whole mass, or body of sin consisting of different members, may be destroyed, and we may no longer serve as slaves under the tyranny of sin.

From the end of baptism he shows that we should be dead to sin, and walk in the newness of life (verse 4); for, while baptism represents the crucifixion of Christ, it also signifies and effects the crucifixion of our vices. “Our old man,” i.e., the sinfulness and corruption inherited from Adam, or rather man himself, as affected by this sinfulness. The Apostle distinguishes two men, the old and the new. The “old man was crucified” with Christ; for, in his person “who was made for us a malediction,” the entire fallen race of Adam was nailed to the cross. “That the body of sin,” i.e., the entire mass or collection of sins—the members of which collection are uncleanness, avarice, &c. (Colossians, 3). They are called a body, because as different members joined together constitute a body, so all the particular sins committed by the “old man” constitute a “body” also; in using the word body, the Apostle carries with him the idea of crucifixion, and alludes to the body of man after he fell in Adam, before he was renewed in Christ. This corrupt body was made by man the instrument of indulging his concupiscences. “May be destroyed,” by mortifying and restraining its members, “and may serve sin no longer.” “Sin” is represented as a tyrant exercising dominion over us.

Rom 6:7  For he that is dead is justified from sin.

For, as the dead slave is freed from servitude, so are we, who are dead to sin by baptism, freed from its tyranny; and hence, we should no longer serve it.

He continues to represent sin as a tyrant exercising sway—“is justified from sin?” “justified” is taken in a legal sense to signify acquitted, fully absolved, so as not to be again questioned on that account.

Rom 6:8  Now, if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall live also together with Christ.

But if we be really dead to sin with Christ, we have a firm hope and confidence, that one day we shall enjoy with Christ a glorious and immortal life.

“We believe,” i.e., we confidently hope, “we shall live together with Christ.” These words are understood by Estius to refer to our living a life of grace after the model of His glorious and immortal life. The interpretation in the Paraphrase, which makes it refer to our living with him one day a life of glory in heaven, is, however, to be preferred; for, the Apostle would appear to take occasion, from treating of the life of grace, to refer to the reward of future glory, as a means of stimulating men to the practice of virtue. The opinion of Estius, however, derives great probability from the meaning given to the words, alive unto God, verse 11, where the foregoing example is applied.

Rom 6:9  Knowing that Christ, rising again from the dead, dieth now no more. Death shall no more have dominion over him.

As we know that Christ, resuscitated from the tomb, dies no more, death has no further dominion over him he (enjoys a glorious and immortal life, free from all the ills of mortality).

These words show that Christ, now risen, shall live for ever; and hence, as we are to live with him, we are to enjoy an immortal life. The connexion is more easily seen in the interpretation of Estius: “We shall live also together with Christ,” (verse 8). But what life is that?—an unceasing, continuous life of grace; for such is its model—the life of Christ resuscitated from the tomb; or, perhaps, it might be more probably said, that this verse has no immediate connexion with the foregoing; but that in it is merely introduced a new reason for persevering in grace—founded on the mode of Christ’s death and resurrection. From the very nature, the oneness, of Christ’s resurrection, he shows our obligation to persevere in good, and not relapse again into the state of sin.

Rom 6:10  For in that he died to sin, he died once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.

For, so far as his death is concerned, it took place but once for the expiation of sin, but as to his life, it is altogether employed for the glory of God.

“He died to sin, he died once,” i.e., he died one death to expiate and atone for sin. In the common Greek, the punctuation is so placed that the words “to sin” are joined to “once,” thus, “he died to sin once.” The punctuation in the Codex Vaticanusὅ γὰρ απεθανεν, τῆ αμαρτία, απεθανεν εφαπαξ,” leaves the matter doubtful. “But he liveth unto God,” i.e., solely for God’s glory; and hence, our life of grace should be devoted to the same; or, the words, “unto God,” may mean, he lived a life worthy of God, immortal and unchangeable.

Rom 6:11  So do you also reckon that you are dead to sin, but alive unto God, in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

So do you, therefore, after his example, regard yourselves as dead to sin by baptism, and gifted with an unchanging, unfading life of grace, to be wholly devoted to the promotion of God’s glory, through the grace and merits of Jesus Christ our Lord.

He applies the foregoing, and founds on it the exhortation to sanctity of life. Hence, we should regard ourselves after baptism as dead once and for ever to sin, and living, like Christ, solely for God, performing all the actions of our life solely for the end of advancing his glory.

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Commentary on 2 Kings 4:8-11, 15-16a

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

The following is from a Protestant reference work, The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. The excerpt has no theological issues which should concern Catholics. Text in red indicate my additions.

2 Kings 4:8

8. And it fell on a day] From its use elsewhere the Hebrew noun, as here, with the article signifies ‘on that day’, ‘at that time’, and indicates a closer connexion with the preceding narrative than would be gathered from the A.V. But see below, verses 11 and 18.

Elisha passed to Shunem] In Jos 19:18, Shunem is among the places allotted to the tribe of Issachar. It is also mentioned as the place where the Philistines encamped before the battle of Gilboa (1 Sam 28:4). It has been identified with Solam, a village situate on the little Hermon about 3 miles north of Jezreel. When Elisha was travelling either from Samaria or Jezreel to Carmel, Shunem lay on his road. The place is mentioned as being the home of Abishag (1 Kings 1:3) and from that is derived the Jewish tradition which makes the Shunammite woman of the present narrative to have been the sister of Abishag.

a great woman] The adjective is used to signify wealthy in 1 Sam 25:2, of Nabal, and 2 Sam 19:32 of Barzillai, who is described as ‘a very great man’. As the Shunammite woman had a husband still alive, it would be more natural to speak of him as ‘great’ in the sense of ‘rich’, and perhaps here the meaning is rather ‘influential’. She was clearly a person of independent character, and one who could act when the occasion demanded it.

she constrained him to eat bread] The journeys of Elisha to and fro had somehow become known to her and she offered him hospitality. This was the usual way in the East, where houses for public entertainment were uncommon.
as oft as he passed by] Apparently the allusion is to such rounds as the chief of the prophetic colleges would make to the different centres at which they were gathered. That Elisha’s visits were frequent is clear from the next verse.

2 Kings 4:9

she said unto her husband] The woman was not content with providing food, but out of reverence for the character of the visitor, desired to provide a lodging also.

I perceive that this is a holy man of God] Probably before the first invitation the woman had learnt something of Elisha’s work and the reason of his frequent journeys. Now when he became their guest she had full opportunity of enquiring from Gehazi, and observing for herself the way in which he laboured to keep alive the true worship of God in the land. The existence of a family like this of the Shunammite is evidence that amid much corruption God was not yet forgotten in the ten tribes. The name ‘man of God’ was applied to Elijah (1 Kings 17:24) by the widow of Zarephath after she had beheld what great things God did through his ministry. She added also ‘the word of the Lord in thy mouth is truth’, which probably represents much of the feeling of the Shunammite when she spake of Elisha as ‘holy’.

2 Kings 4:10

Let us make] The R.V. brings ‘I pray thee’ to follow these words according to the Hebrew order.

a little chamber … on the wall] The Hebrew might mean either a chamber with a wall, a walled room, in contradistinction to one built of wood, or a building above the usual roof of the house and so supported by the walls. The latter seems to be the sense required here, for it is said (verse 21) that the mother went up when she wished to lay the dead child upon the prophet’s bed. As the roofs of Eastern houses can be reached by a staircase from outside, a chamber on the housetop (cf. Prov 21:9; Prov 25:24) would furnish the sort of privacy which Elisha would desire. He could also thus come in and go out without being mixed up with the movements of the household.

a bed] The articles here named form the proper furniture of an Eastern room, where a superabundance of such articles is nowhere found.

a stool] The word is that which is often rendered ‘throne’, and it probably in this case means the couch or divan which runs along the wall of an Eastern dwelling-room.

he shall turn in] The verb, which is the same as in verse 8, is that which Lot employs (Gen 19:2) in his invitation to the two angels. Preparation was made so that the prophet and his servant might be at rest, and come and go when they pleased. As a halting place in a long journey it would be very acceptable.

2 Kings 4:11

No comment is offered on this verse which reads: Now, there was a certain day, when he came, and turned into the chamber, and rested there. It simply states that the purpose for which the “little chamber” was furnished was fulfilled.

2 Kings 4:14

And he said] Clearly, to Gehazi. This the LXX. adds.

Verily she hath no child] R.V. son. The R.V. is correct, though it seems from the whole narrative that the woman was childless. Of the great grief felt from want of children we learn in the history of Hannah (1 Sam 1:10-11). Gehazi had probably learnt that this was a sorrow in the family at Shunem.

2 Kings 4:15

And he said. Call her] It would seem from these words that the woman had gone away at once after saying she had no wants which needed a petition to the king or the captain of the host.

she stood in the door] Her reverence for Elisha kept her at the threshold.

2 Kings 4:16a
The “a” following 16 indicates the first part of the verse.

according to the time of life] R.V. when the time cometh round. The literal sense of the verb is explained on the margin of R.V. = liveth, or reviveth. The phrase is the same which is used Gen 18:14 to the childless Sarah before the birth of Isaac.

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Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR A

READINGS:

NABRE. Used in USA.

NJB. Used in most English speaking countries.

THEMES: Suggested homily, bible study and catechetical ideas.

Homily, Bible Study, Catechetical Helps for the 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A.

Doctrinal Homily Outline.

Lector Notes.

Lector Works.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Jeremiah 20:10-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Jeremiah 20:10-13.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 69:8-10, 14, 17, 33-35.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 69.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 69.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 69.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 5:12-15.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 5:12-15. On 12-19.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 5:12-15. On 12-21.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 5:12-15. On 12-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 5:12-15.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 10:26-33.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:26-33. On 24-33.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:26-33. On 24-33.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:26-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:26-33.

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Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:26-33

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

Ver 26. “Fear them not therefore: for there is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be known.27. What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light: and what ye hear in the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops.28. And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.”

Remig.: To the foregoing consolation He adds another no less, saying, “Fear ye not them,” namely, the persecutors. And why they were not to fear, He adds, “For there is nothing hid which shall not be revealed, nothing secret which shall not be known.”

Jerome: How is it then that in the present world, the sins of so many are unknown? It is of the time to come that this is said; the time when God shall judge the hidden things of men, shall enlighten the hidden places of darkness, and shall make manifest the secrets of hearts. The sense is, Fear not the cruelty of the persecutor, or the rage of the blasphemer, for there shall come a day of judgment in which your virtue and their wickedness will be made known.

Hilary: Therefore neither threatening, nor evil speaking, nor power of their enemies should move them, seeing the judgment-day will disclose how empty, how nought all these were.

Chrys.: Otherwise; It might seem that what is here said should be applied generally; but it is by no means intended as a general maxim, but is spoken solely with reference to what had gone before with this meaning; If you are grieved when men revile you, think that in a little time you will be delivered from this evil. They call you indeed impostors, sorcerers, seducers, but have a little patience, and all men shall call you the saviours of the world, when in the course of things you shall be found to have been their benefactors, for men will not judge by their words but by the truth of things.

Remig.: Some indeed think that these words convey a promise from our Lord to His disciples, that through them all hidden mysteries should be revealed, which lay beneath the veil of the letter of the Law; whence the Apostle speaks, “When they have turned to Christ, then the veil shall be taken away.” [2Co_3:16] So the sense would be, Ought you to fear your persecutors, when you are thought worthy that by you the hidden mysteries of the Law and the Prophets should be made manifest?

Chrys.: Then having delivered them from all fear, and set them above all calumny, He follows this up appropriately with commanding that their preaching should be free and unreserved; “What I say to you in darkness, that speak ye in the light; what ye hear in the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops.”

Jerome: We do not read that the Lord was wont to discourse to them by night, or to deliver his doctrine in the dark; but He said this because all His discourse is dark to the carnal, and His word night to the unbelieving. What had been spoken by Him they were to deliver again with the confidence of faith and confession.

Remig.: The meaning therefore is, “What I say to you in darkness,” that is, among the unbelieving Jews, “that speak ye in the light,” that is, preach it to the believing; “what ye hear in the ear,” that is, what I say unto you secretly, “that preach ye upon the housetops,” that is, openly before all men. It is a common phrase, To speak in one’s ear, that is, to speak to him privately.

Rabanus: And what He says, “Preach ye upon the housetops,” is spoken after the manner of the province of Palestine, where they use to sit upon the roofs of the houses, which are not pointed but flat. That then may be said to be preached upon the housetops which is spoken in the hearing of all men.

Gloss. ord.: Otherwise; What I say unto you while you are yet held under carnal fear, that speak ye in the confidence of truth, after ye shall be enlightened by the Holy Spirit; what you have only heard, that preach by doing the same, being raised above you bodies, which are the dwellings of your souls.

Jerome: Otherwise; What you hear in mystery, that teach in plainness of speech; what I have taught you in a corner of Judaea, that proclaim boldly in all quarters of the world.

Chrys.: As He said, “He that believeth on me, the works that I do he shall do also, and greater things than these shall he do;” [Joh_14:12] so here He shews that He works all things through them more than through Himself; as though He had said, I have made a beginning, but what is beyond, that I will to complete through your means. So that this is not a command but a prediction, shewing them that they shall overcome all things.

Hilary: Therefore they ought to inculcate constantly the knowledge of God, and the profound secret of evangelic doctrine, to be revealed by the light of preaching; having no fear of those who have power only over the body, but cannot reach the soul; “Fear not those that kill the body, but cannot kill the soul.”

Chrys.: Observe how He sets them above all others, encouraging them to set at nought cares, reproaches, perils, yea even the most terrible of all things, death itself, in comparison of the fear of God.”But rather fear him, who can destroy both soul and body in hell.”

Jerome: This word is not found in the Old Scriptures, but it is first used by the Saviour. Let us enquire then into its origin. We read in more than one place that the idol Baal was near Jerusalem, at the foot of Mount Moriah, by which the brook Siloe flows. This valley and a small level plain was watered and woody, a delightful spot, and a grove in it was consecrated to the idol. To so great folly and madness had the people of Israel come, that, forsaking the neighbourhood of the Temple, they offered their sacrifices there, and concealing an austere ritual under a voluptuous life, they burned their sons in honour of a daemon.

This place was called, Gehennom, that is, The valley of the children of Hinnom. These things are fully described in Kings and Chronicles, and the Prophet Jeremiah. [2Ki_23:10, 2Ch_26:3, Jer_7:32; Jer_32:35] God threatens that He will fill the place with the carcasses of the dead, that it be no more called Tophet and Baal, but Polyandrion, i.e. The tomb of the dead. Hence the torments and eternal pains with which sinners shall be punished are signified by this word.

Aug., City of God, book xiii, ch. 2: This cannot be before the soul is so joined to the body, that nothing may sever them. Yet it is rightly called the death of the soul, because it does not live of God; and the death of the body, because though man does not cease to feel, yet because this his feeling has neither pleasure nor health, but is a pain and a punishment, it is better named death than life.

Chrys.: Note also, that He does not hold out to them deliverance from death, but encourages them to despise it; which is a much greater thing than to be rescued from death; also this discourse aids in fixing in their minds the doctrine of immortality.

Ver 29. “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.30. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.31. Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.”

Chrys.: Having set aside fear of death, that the Apostles should not think that if they were put to death they were deserted by God, He passes to discourse of God’s providence, saying, “Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing, and one of them does not fall to the ground without your Father?”

Jerome: If these little creations fall not without God’s superintendence and providence, and if things made to perish, perish not without God’s will, you who are immortal ought not to fear that you live without His providence.

Hilary: Figuratively; That which is sold is our soul and body, and that to which it is sold, is sin. They then who sell two sparrows for a farthing, are they who sell themselves for the smallest sin, born for flight, and for reaching heaven with spiritual wings. [margin note: see Psa_124:7] Caught by the bait of present pleasures, and sold to the enjoyment of the world, they barter away their whole selves in such a market. It is of the will of God that one of them rather soar aloft; but the law proceeding according to God’s appointment decrees that one of them should fall. In like manner as, if they soared aloft they would become one spiritual body; so, when sold under sin, the soul gathers earthly matter from the pollution of vice, and there is made of them one body which is committed to earth.

Jerome: That He says, “The hairs of your head are all numbered,” shews the boundless providence of God towards man, and a care unspeakable that nothing of ours is hid from God.

Hilary: For when any thing is numbered it is carefully watched over.

Chrys.: Not that God reckons our hairs, but to shew His diligent knowledge, and great carefulness over us.

Jerome: Those who deny the resurrection of the flesh ridicule the sense of the Church on this place, as if we affirmed that every hair that has ever been cut off by the razor rises again, when the Saviour says, “Every hair of your head” – not is saved, but – “is numbered.” Where there is number, knowledge of that number is implied, but not preservation of the same hairs.

Aug., City of God, book xxii, ch. 19: Though we may fairly enquire concerning our hair, whether all that has ever been shorn from us will return; for who would not dread such disfigurement. When it is once understood that nothing of our body shall be lost, so as that the form and perfectness of all the parts should be preserved, we at the same time understand that all that would have disfigured our body is to be united or taken up by the whole mass, not affixed to particular parts so as to destroy the frame of the limbs; just as a vessel made of clay, and again reduced to clay, is once more reformed into a vessel, it needs not that that portion of clay which had formed the handle should again form it, or that which had composed the bottom, should again go to the bottom, so long as the whole was remoulded into the whole, the whole clay into the whole vessel, no part being lost.

Wherefore if the hair so often shorn away would be a deformity if restored to the place it had been taken from, it will not be restored to that place, but all the materials of the old body will be revived in the new, whatever place they may occupy so as to preserve the mutual fitness of parts. Though what is said in Luke, “Not a hair of your head shall fall to the ground,” [Luk_21:18] may be taken of the number, not the length of the hairs, as here also it is said, “The hairs of your head are all numbered.”

Hilary: For it is an unworthy task to number things that are to perish. Therefore that we should know that nothing of us should perish, we are told that our very hairs are numbered. No accident then that can befal our bodies is to be feared.

Thus He adds, “Fear not, ye are better than many sparrows.”

Jerome: This expresses still more clearly the sense as it was above explained, that they should not fear those who can kill the body, for if the least animal falls not without God’s knowledge, how much less a man who is dignified with the Apostolic rank?

Hilary: Or this, “ye are better than many sparrows,” teaches that the elect faithful are better than the multitude of the unbelieving, for the one fall to earth, the other fly to heaven.

Remig.: Figuratively; Christ is the head, the Apostles the hairs, who are well said to be numbered, because the names of the saints are written in heaven.

Ver 32. “Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven.33. But whosoever shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven.”

Chrys.: The Lord having banished that fear which haunted the minds of His disciples, adds further comfort in what follows, not only casting out fear, but by hope of greater rewards encouraging them to a free proclamation of the truth, saying, “Every man who shall confess me before men, I also will confess him before my Father which is in heaven.” And it is not properly “shall confess me,” but as it is in the Greek, “shall confess in me,” shewing that it is not by your own strength but by grace from above, that you confess Him whom you do confess.

Hilary: This He says in conclusion, because it behoves them after being confirmed by such teaching, to have a confident freedom in confessing God.

Remig.: Here is to be understood that confession of which the Apostle speaks, “With the heart men believe unto justification, with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.” [Rom_10:10] That none therefore might suppose that he could be saved without confession of the mouth, He says not only, “He that shall confess me,” but adds, “before me;” and again, “He that shall deny me before men, him will I also deny before my Father which is in heaven.”

Hilary: This teaches us, that in what measure we have borne witness to Him upon earth, in the same shall we have Him to bear witness to us in heaven before the face of God the Father.

Chrys.: Here observe that the punishment is manifold more than the evil done, and the reward more than the good done. As much as to say, your deed was more abundant in confessing or denying Me here; so shall My deed to you be more abundant in confessing or denying you there. Wherefore if you have done any good thing, and have not received retribution, be not troubled, for a manifold reward awaits you in the time to come. And if you have done any evil, and have not paid the punishment thereof, do not think that you have escaped, for punishment will overtake you, unless you are changed and become better.

Raban.: It should be known that not even Pagans can deny the existence of God, but the infidels may deny that the Son as well as the Father is God. The Son confesses men before the Father, because by the Son we have access to the Father, and because the Son saith, “Come, ye blessed of my Father.” [Mat_25:34]

Remig.: And thus He will deny the man that hath denied Him, in that he shall not have access to the Father through Him, and shall be banished from seeing either the Son of the Father in their divine nature.

Chrys.: He not only requires faith which is of the mind, but confession which is by the mouth, that He may exalt us higher, and raise us to a more open utterance, and a larger measure of love. For this is spoken not to the Apostles only, but to all; He gives strength not to them only, but to their disciples. And he that observes this precept will not only teach with free utterance, but will easily convince all; for the observance of this command drew many to the Apostles.

Raban.: Or, He confesses Jesus who by that faith that worketh by love, obediently fulfils His commands; he denies Him who is disobedient.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, fathers of the church, Notes on the Gospel of Matthew, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture, St Thomas Aquinas | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST
(Corpus Christi)

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood (Corpus Christi).

MONDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:38-42.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Matt 5:38-42). St Joe of O Blog. On verses 17-48. Covers tomorrow’s gospel too.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

TUESDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:43-48.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48. St Joe of O Blog. On verses 17-48. Posted yesterday also.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

WEDNESDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Pending: R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18. St Joe of O Blog.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

THURSDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 111.

Pope Benedict’s Commentary on Psalm 111.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15. St Joe of O Blog.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

St Augustine’s Sermon on the Lord’s Prayer.

FRIDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:18, 21-30. On 16-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:18, 21-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:19-23.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23. St Joe of O Blog. On 19-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23.

SATURDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Pending: Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Today’s Responsorial (Ps 34).

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:24-34.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

SUNDAY OF THE TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, A, B & C
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

MONDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father MacEvilly’s Introduction to 2 Corinthians.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father Boylan’s introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’s Lecture on Psalm 34.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:1-12.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

St Augustine’s Book 1 on Sermon on the Mount. On Matthew 5.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

TUESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Jaun de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:13-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 99.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 99.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 99.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:17-19.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

THURSDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction With My Notes on Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 85.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:20-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

FRIDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’c Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 116.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 116. On verses 10-19 which covers the verse used today in the responsorial.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 116.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:27-32.

Pending: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

SATURDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:33-37.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST
(Corpus Christi)

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood (Corpus Christi).

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Ninth Week in Ordinary Time (Includes Pentecost & Most Holy Trinity)

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

PENTECOST SUNDAY

Extended Vigil Mass.
Mass During the Day.

MONDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 1:3, 2:1-8.

Overview of the Book of Tobit, chapters 1-3.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:1-12.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:1-12.

TUESDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 2:9-14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:13-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:13-17.

WEDNESDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 3:1-11a, 16-17a.

Father Berry’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 25.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 25. On verses 1-9 which includes the verses used in the responsorial.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 25.

My Notes on Psalm 25. These notes cover verses 1-14 and so include the verses chosen for today’s responsorial.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:18-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:18-27.

THURSDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 6:10-11; 7:1bcde, 9-17; 8:4-9a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:28-34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:28-34.

FRIDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Tobit 11:5-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:35-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:35-37.

SATURDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Tobit 12:1, 5-15, 20.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on the Responsorial. Covers Tobit 13:1-8.

Father Cornelius a Lapides’ Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:38-44.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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