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Archive for July, 2017

Fifth Sunday After Epiphany: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica V Post Epiphaniam)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 31, 2017

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Romans Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instruction On The Epistles and Gospels.  Online book, scroll down to middle of page. Contains the readings with brief instructions, prayers. You can use the site’s zoom feature to increase text size for easier reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: Colossians 3:12-17.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 13:24-30.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30. On 24-43.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 13:24-30.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

Epistle Homily. Bishop Bonomelli.

Epistle Homily: Homiletic Sketch: Charity, the Bond of Perfection. Fr. Johann Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Homiletic Sketch: The Parable of the Wheat and the Cockle. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Dogmatic Sketch: The Sanctity of the Church. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Liturgical Sketch: How the Early Christians Celebrated Sunday. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Symbolic Sketch: Sin, A Sleep. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Moral Sketch: Why God Suffers the Wicked Among the Good. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Moral Sketch: Lukewarmness. Fr. Zollner.

Homily on the Gospel. Bishop Bonomelli.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 13:24-30.

St John Chrysostom’s Homily on Matthew 13:24-30. Same as the one listed under commentaries on the gospel.

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Fourth Sunday After Epiphany: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica IV Post Epiphaniam)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Romans Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instruction On The Epistles and Gospels.  Online book, scroll down to middle of page. Contains the readings with brief instructions, prayers. You can use the site’s zoom feature to increase text size for easier reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON:Romans 13:8-10.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 13:8-10.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 13:8-10.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 13:8-10.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Romans 13:8-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 8:23-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 8:23-27.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27.

Father Cornelius a Lapides Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

Owe No Man Anything But to Love One Another~A Homily on Romans 13:8-10 by Bishop Bonomelli.

Homily Notes on Romans 13:8: Payment of Debts. Fr. George Howe.

Homily Notes on Romans 3:10: The Decalogue. Fr. George Howe.

St Jerome’s Homily on Matthew 8:23-27.

(1) The Mystical Ship. St Thomas Aquinas’ homily notes on Mt 8:23.

(2) The Mystical Ship. St Thomas Aquinas.

Homily Notes on Matthew 8:24: The Storm as a Type of Both the Church and the Soul. Fr. George Howe.

Homily Notes on Matthew 8:24: The Passions. Fr. George Howe.

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Homily Notes on Matthew 8:24: The Passions by Fr. George Howe

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

THE PASSIONS.
A great tempest arose~Mt 8:2424.

i. A storm at sea, one of the figures of the passions of the soul.
ii. As the passions become sources of sin, consider three points.

The evil passions:

i. Included under three heads chiefly: 1 Jn. 2:16.

a. The concupiscence of the eyes: love of riches.

b. The concupiscence of the flesh: love of pleasure.

c. The pride of life: love of honours,

ii. Incitements to the passions:

a. Objects acting on the senses or the imagination.

b. Fuel supplied by reading, self-indulgence, etc.

c. Idleness: Sirach 33:29.

d. Want of self-restraint.

iii. Figured by the winds, a raging fire, an unruly horse.

Why to be subdued?

i. As useful and necessary, as the breaking in of a horse,

ii. We must avoid sin, and therefore overcome its causes,

iii. Holy Scripture warns us:

Go not after thy lusts, but turn away from thy own will Sir 18:30.
If any man will come after Me, let him deny himself Mt 16:24.

iv. Examples and teaching of the Saints:

Conquer thyself St Ignatius.
The greater violence thou offerest to thyself, the greater the progress thou wilt make Imitation of Christ.

v. Unless subdued themselves, they enslave the soul, as typified by:

The brothers of Joseph, yielding to their envy: Gen. 42.
The prodigal son: Lk 15.
Nabuchodonosor, become as an animal in the fields: Dan. 4:30.

vi. They darken the mind, and disturb the heart,

vii. They cause many mistakes and much misery, both for time and eternity,

viii. Subjection to the passions is a kind of idolatry.

Antiochus and the idol in the Temple: 1 Macc 1:57

ix. To subdue the passions is a glory.

He that ruleth his spirit (is better) than he that taketh cities~Prov. 16:32.

x. Whoso subdues them is truly free.

How to be subdued?

i. Never despair of victory. There are no passions so violent, that they cannot be overcome,

ii. Don t complain of their violence. You are stronger than they, if only you will fight them,

iii. You must wage war against them :

a. With determination.

b. Attacking the predominant passion first. Few subjects can be more interesting than that of the ruling passion, for no obstacle to progress is more common, or more secret, and therefore none more dangerous. There can be no true progress, until an active war is being waged against it.

c. With perseverance. Said the Abbot Theodore to a young monk: You complain that you are fighting now for eight years! Behold I am eighty years of age, and am fighting still.

d. Without discouragement, even should you fall.

e. With confidence in God.

I can do all things in Him who strengthened me~Phil. 4:13.

f. Taking the necessary means:Prayer, watchfulness, penance, etc.

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Homily Notes on Matthew 8:24: The Storm as a Type of Both the Church and the Soul by Fr. George Howe

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

THE STORM, A TYPE OF BOTH THE CHURCH AND THE SOUL.
A great tempest arose in the sea~Mt 8:24.

i. Scripture often represents life as a stormy ocean,
ii. The ship, in to-day’s Gospel, is a type of

a. The Church, amid persecutions and scandals.
b. The Soul, in temptation and trial.

I. The Church:

i. Persecution in some form, ever the lot of the Church: e.g.

a. The ten great persecutions, under the Roman Emperors.

b. Persecution in pagan lands still: In China, Africa, etc.

c. Opposition and oppression in civilized lands: As in Italy and France, at the present day. (Fr. Howe published these notes in 1903. Needless to say, opposition and oppression have become even more widespread in the western world).

d. Captivity or exile of the Head of the Church.

ii. Scandals in the Church:

a. Fall of even an Apostle.

b. Heresies and Schisms:

Arianism, condemned A.D. 325.

The Iconoclasts, 8th c.

Schism in England, i6th c.

c. Dissensions, disputes, etc.

iii. Recourse to God, as with the Apostles to Our Lord.

a. Fervent prayer: Lord, save us.

1. Leo XIII. on prayer in the Church’s trials.

b. Faith and Confidence in God who overrules all.

1. His promise to be ever with the Church: Mt 28:20.

c. Good lives in Catholics, showing forth the truth of Religion.

II. The Soul:

i. Individual souls tempted to sin:

a. Against God: pride, irreligion.

b. Against Neighbours: injustice of any kind.

c. Against Self: sensuality, idleness.

ii. Each one has trials of the temporal order also :

a. Poverty, sickness, deaths.

b. Persecution from neighbours,

iii. Act then, as sailors in a storm:

a. They reef the sails, lest the winds overpower them.

1. Curb the love of pleasure.

2. Mortify the senses.

3. Otherwise the soul will sink into sin, perhaps into Hell !

b. They make for the high seas :

1. Avoid the world and its pleasures.

2. Soar aloft in prayer.

c. They throw goods overboard, to lighten the vessel.

1. Cast forth sin in humble confession.

2. Sailors regret their loss, yet safety is the first consideration.

3. So we, with sin and its occasions, must gain salvation at any cost.

d. Remember that all things work for good, if we love Go: Rom. 8:28.

Lessons:

i. In the public trials of the Church, have recourse to prayer. Though His ways seem slow, God s Providence is ever watchful.
ii. So also in the private crosses of each one.
iii. Perseverance in prayer pleasing to God, and essential.
iv. Human passions cause turmoil in the soul.

a. Our Lord may seem to sleep, because of our tepidity.
b. Call on Him by Prayer, Penance, Almsdeeds.

v. Rejoice, amid the storms in your soul, as being thought worthy to suffer for God : Acts 5:41.

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Father George Howe’s Homily Notes on Romans 13:10

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

THE DECALOGUE.
Love therefore is the fulfilling of the law~Rom 13:10

i. S. Paul tells us charity is the fulfilment of the Law: Rom. 13:10.
ii. He then goes on to recall a good part of this Law.
iii. Take this occasion to speak on the Decalogue.

The Decalogue:

i. So called from the Greek, meaning “ten words.”

ii. Comprises the ten Commandments, given on Sinai: Ex. 20.

a. A compendium of Morals, as the Creed is of Faith.

b. Explicit statement of the laws of truth, order, and justice,

iii. Like God Himself, they are Holy . . . True . . . Just . . . Unchangeable,

iv. Necessary for salvation.

a. Our first duty to God is belief in His Revelation. Delivering the Mind from ignorance.

b. Our second duty is observance of His Laws. Delivering the Heart from concupiscence.

c. Need of knowing these laws, through instruction, etc.

v. Not a burden, but a benefit to man, even here. The parapet: If on a narrow plank, crossing a ravine, a parapet is raised on either side, so that a traveller cannot fall into the abyss, unless he deliberately leap over it, no one would consider its erection a piece of tyranny, or an unreasonable curtailment of his freedom and liberty: on the contrary, it is a benefit bestowed to secure his safety. So with man, on his way to eternity, the Commandments are a protection to him, as he passes along the

vi. Divided into

a. Positive: requiring a thing to be done: e.g. the 4th.

b. Negative: forbidding a thing to be done: e.g. the 7th. The stream and its banks: The positive precepts are like so many different streams, conveying the riches of a fountain to various parts of the earth. The negative are like banks, hindering the passions from troubling the waters, and turning them out of their course.

vii. Binding

a. On all men, unlike human laws.

b. Each and every commandment: Whosoever shall offend in one point is become guilty of all. Jas. 2:10.

One instrument out of tune destroys a whole concerted piece.

One weak link weakens the whole chain,

viii. Therefore possible to all.

a. God is wisdom, goodness, and justice.

b. He does not, can not, exact the impossible.

c. Grace is given to enable us to observe His Law.

d. The Saints have kept it, so may we.

ix. Confirmed by Christ in the New Law :

a. By His teaching and doctrine.

b. By His example in life.

c. By His sending the Holy Ghost.

Lessons:

i. Learn, understand and love the commandments,

ii. Humility, in submission and obedience to them,

iii. Petition for grace in temptation against them.

IV. Heaven the reward of observing them.

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Father George Howe’s Homily Notes on Romans 13:8 On the Payment of Debts

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

PAYMENT OF DEBTS.
Owe no man anything. Rom. 13:8.

1. There is one debt we can never fully pay the debt of charity.

2. All other debts we must try to discharge. Owe no man anything.

3. Too often neglected is this precept of the Apostle.

We must pay our debts:

i. When goods are bought, the price of them belongs to the seller. He parts with them, on the understanding we pay
him their value.

ii. To refuse payment is an unjust keeping of what belongs to another.

a. Now, all unjust keeping is forbidden by the 7th Commandment.

b. It is always sinful, therefore, to some degree.

c. Hence, we must pay our debts.

iii. Under this heading come wages, loans, interest, rent, etc.

a. They are all real debts of justice.

b. But how often is there unnecessary delay in paying them.

iv. We must economize, so as to be able to meet our liabilities!

Evils of delay:

i. Inconvenience and loss to creditors.

a. Tradesmen have goods to buy, for resale.

b. These they must pay for.

c. But how do it, if their own dues be withheld ?

d. All know the inconvenience of want of money,

ii. Sometimes such delay may spell ruin.

a. Tradespeople being thus unable to pay their way, further goods are refused them.

b. What responsibility in us, to place them in such a position!

iii. Necessity of having to make restitution, founded on

a. The Natural Law, implanted in the heart.

b. The Divine Law of God: Ex. 22:5; Mt 22:21.

c. The Civil Law of nations.

d. Duty most strictly binding, where possible.

e. Duty oftentimes as difficult as it is essential, e.g., through human respect, fear of detection, etc.

iv. Ill-feeling between neighbours:

a. Men thus defrauded naturally resent the evil.

b. Ill-feeling may then spring up, which

1. May deepen into hatred, and

2. Lead to detraction, calumny, etc.

c. Thus is scandal produced.

v. Scorn and ridicule brought on Religion : for,

a. Too often “Good church-goers are bad debtpayers.”

b. Too often they run into debt for mere luxuries.

c. Too often they borrow, without prospect of being able to repay ;

d. Too often they take offence, when asked to settle accounts!

e. All this is opposed to simple honesty and truemReligion. Hence the contempt into which Religion is brought.

Lessons:

i. Ever show real honesty in all your dealings with others.

ii. Be thoughtful to pay your just debts within reason able time.

iii. If bound to restitution, make it at once. Conscience cannot rest till this be done. Better still

iv. Avoid the difficulty of restitution, by avoiding the cause of it.

v. All this will be easy, if we make Christian charity our guide.

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The Mystical Ship, Part 2: Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Matthew 8:23

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

THE MYSTICAL SHIP (Part II)
FOURTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY.
“And when He was entered into a ship His disciples followed Him.”
Matt 8:23.

MORALLY, by a ship holiness of life is signified by reason of (I) the material; (II) the form; (III) the use.

I. THE MATERIAL. On the first head, the material of the ship, it is to be noted that a ship is made of wood, iron, oakum, and pitch:

(A) By wood is represented righteousness, which is the righteousness of Christ Wis. 14:7, “Blessed is the wood by which justice cometh.”

(B) By iron, on account of its solidity, fortitude is expressed Jer. 1:18, “Behold I have made thee this day an inner pillar.”

(C) By oakum or tow, by which wounds are bound up, is implied temperance, by which is healed the wound of fleshly
lust. Of those whose wounds have not been bound up it is said, Isa. 1:6, “Wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores: they have not been closed, neither bound up.” Judges 16:13, of Samson, when deceived by Delilah, and bound with new ropes, “he broke them from off his arms like a thread.”

(D) By pitch is symbolized charity, which is the bond of souls Gen. 6:14, “Pitch it (Noah’s ark) within and without with pitch.” A holy man is formed by charity 1 Cor. 16:14, “Let all your things be done with charity.

II. THE FORM. On the second head it is to be noted that the form of the ship consists in five particulars.

Firstly, the smallness of the beginning.

Secondly, breadth of the middle.

Thirdly, the height of the end.

Fourthly, the narrowness of the bottom.

Fifthly, the wideness of the top.

Concerning the smallness of its beginning, is the grief for past sins Jer. 6:26, “Make thee mourning as for an only son, most bitter lamentation.”

Concerning the breadth of the middle is hope of the eternal joys Rom. 12:12, “Rejoicing in hope.”

Concerning the height of the end is the fear of eternal punishments. The holy man grieves over the sins he commits, and he fears the punishments which he merits, but he fails not through desperation in fear and grief S. Matt. 3:8, “Bring forth, therefore, fruits meet for repentance.”

Concerning the narrowness of the bottom is the humility which arises from highest goodness Ps. 81:10, “Open thy mouth wide and I will fill it.

Concerning the wideness of the top… Unfortunately, the notes make no elucidation on this point.

III. THE USE. On the third head it is to be noted that the use of a ship in four ways stands for holiness of life.

 The first use is to carry men across the sea. We ought by holiness to pass over the sea of this world to the heavenly country, to God Wis 14:5, “Men also trust their lives even to a little wood, and passing over the sea by ships are saved.”

The second is to carry merchandise, or fruits, which are the odour of good works, to be diffused from us on all sides
Job. 4:25-26, “My days are swifter than a post they are passed away as the swift ships.” Phil. 4:18, “An odour of a sweet smell, a sacrifice acceptable, well-pleasing to God.”

The third use is to make war in them. We ought by holiness to war against the demons 1 Macc 15:3, “I have chosen
a great army, and have built ships of war.” Eph. 6:12, “We wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers.”

The fourth use is to catch fishes, to convert men to God S. Matt. 4: 19, “I will make you fishers of men.”

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Extraordinary Form: Last Sunday After Pentecost: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica XXIV et ultima Post Pentecosten)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
LAST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST
Dominica XXIV et ultima Post Pentecosten

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Roman Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Goffine’s Devout Instructions on the Epistle and Gospel.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: Colossians 1:9-14.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:9-14.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 24:15-35.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 24:15-35.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 24:15-35.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 24:15-35. Read homilies 76 & 77.

Pending (maybe) Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 24:15-35.

Pending (maybe) Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 24:15-35.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

The General Judgment. A homily on the Gospel.

The Cross on the Day of Judgment. Homily on the Gospel.

A Homily on the Epistle.

A Homily on the Gospel.

Thanksgiving and Prayer. Homily on the Epistle.

The Destruction of Jerusalem and the End of the World. Homily on the Gospel.

How Jesus Christ Will Hold the Last Judgment. Homily on the Gospel.

Processions. A Liturgical Sketch based upon the Gospel.

The Abomination of Desolation, a Figure of Sin. A Symbolic Sketch on the Gospel.

Our Death is for Us the End of the World and the Last Judgment. A Moral Sketch on the Gospel.

What We Must Do in Order to be Prepared for the Last Judgment. A Moral Sketch on the Gospel.

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Sixth Sunday After Epiphany: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica III Post Epiphaniam)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY
Dominica III Post Epiphaniam

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Romans Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instruction On The Epistles and Gospels.  Online book, scroll down to bottom of page. Contains the readings with brief instructions, prayers. You can use the site’s zoom feature to increase text size for easier reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: 1 Thessalonians 1:2-10.

My Notes on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

Father Callan on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

Father MacEvily on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

St John Chrysostom on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 13:31-35.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matt 13:31-35.

Cornelius a Lapide on Matt 13:31-35.

Juan de Maldonado on Matt 13:31-35.

St Jerome’s Commentary on Matt 13:31-35.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

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Sixth Sunday After Epiphany: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica VI quae superfuit Post Epiphaniam)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 30, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER EPIPHANY
Dominica VI quae superfuit Post Epiphaniam

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Romans Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instruction On The Epistles and Gospels.  Online book, scroll down to bottom of page. Contains the readings with brief instructions, prayers. You can use the site’s zoom feature to increase text size for easier reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: 1 Thessalonians 1:2-10.

My Notes on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

Father Callan on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

Father MacEvily on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

St John Chrysostom on 1 Thess 1:2-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 13:31-35.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matt 13:31-35.

Cornelius a Lapide on Matt 13:31-35.

Juan de Maldonado on Matt 13:31-35.

St Jerome’s Commentary on Matt 13:31-35.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

 

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