The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for July 14th, 2017

Commentaries for the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

THIRTIETH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:12-17.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:12-17.

Father Haydock’s Commentary on Romans 8:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:12-17. On 8-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:12-17.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Romans 8:13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 68.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 68.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 13:10-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 13:10-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 13:10-17.

TUESDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:18-25. On 18-27.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Romans 8:18-25.

Father Rickaby’s Commentary on Romans 8:18-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:18-25.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:18-25. On 14-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:18-25.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 126.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 126.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 126.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 126.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 13:18-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 13:18-21.

WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2017 this day falls on Nov. 1, the Solemnity of All Saints. The first link is to commentaries for that solemnity. the remaining links are to the normal weekday Mass readings.

2017. Commentaries for the Solemnity of All Saints.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:26-30.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:26-30.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:26-30. On 14-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:26-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 13.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 13.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 13:22-30.

My Notes on Luke 13:22-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 13:22-30.

THURSDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2017 this day falls on Nov. 2, the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls). The first link is to commentaries for the commemoration and the remaining links are to the normal weekday Mass readings.

2017. Commentaries for the Commemoration of All Souls.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:31b-39. On 31-39.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:31b-39. On 31-39.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:31b-39. On 31-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:31b-39.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 109.

Father McSwiney’s Introduction to Psalm 109. St Joe of O Blog.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 109.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 13:31-35.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 13:31-35.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 13:31-35.

FRIDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 9:1-5.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 9:1-5.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 9:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 9:1-5.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 147.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 147.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 147:12-20.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 14:1-6.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 14:1-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 14:1-6.

SATURDAY OF THE THIRTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 11:1-2a, 11-12, 25-29.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 11:1-2a, 11-12, 25-29. On all of chapter 11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 11:1-2a, 11-12, 25-29.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 94.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 94.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 14:1, 7-11.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 14:1, 7-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 14:1, 7-11.

THIRTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We Are in Year A.

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

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Commentaries for the Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

READINGS:

NABRE. Used in USA.

NJB. Used in most other English speaking countries.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Malachi 1:14b-2:2b, 8-10.

My Summary Notes on the Book of Malachi.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 131:1, 2, 3.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 131.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 131.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 131.

COMMENTARIES ON TH SECOND READING: 1 Thessalonians 2:7b-9, 13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:7b-9, 13. On 7-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:7b-9, 13. On 7-13.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 2:7b-9, 13. On 7-13.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 23:1-12.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:1-12.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

 

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My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 2:7b-13

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

2:7b But we were gentle among you, like a nursing mother cherishes her own children.

A contrast with the preceding verses (5-7a) is introduced with the word but. Mothers don’t demand payment from the children they nurse

2:8 Even so, affectionately longing for you, we were well pleased to impart to you, not the Good News of God only, but also our own souls, because you had become very dear to us.

The preaching of the Gospel isn’t just a job, it’s an act of love; a family affair, a giving of ones self completely, like a nursing mother. Thus:

2:9 For you remember, brothers, our labor and travail; for working night and day, that we might not burden any of you, we preached to you the Good News of God.

Concerning work and labor see the introductory comments inset above. Labor and travail are maternal images continuing the theme of 2:7. Also continued here is the theme of 2:6-7. With rare exception (Phil 4:15-16), St Paul never accepted financial help for his ministry; rather, he supported himself as a tent maker (see acts 18:1-3 and 20:33-34).

2:10 You are witnesses with God, how holy, righteously, and blamelessly we behaved ourselves toward you who believe.

Again St Paul calls on the two-fold witness of God and the Thessalonians.

2:11-12 As you know, we exhorted, comforted, and implored every one of you, as a father does his own children, cb(to the end that you should walk worthily of God, who calls you into his own Kingdom and glory.

The opening as you know builds upon the previous verse. To the end shows what it is that motivates Paul’s emphasis on his conduct. As mentioned earlier, St Paul’s primary concern is not defending his actions against false accusations; rather, he wants his converts to imitate him, that they should walk worthily of God, who call them into his own Kingdom and glory. The call of the Thessalonians took place through the preaching of the Gospel, and its mention here reminds us of St Paul’s reference to how they were chosen in 1:4, when the Gospel came to them. The father/children image is an obvious compliment to the nursing mother/Paul in labor and travail theme in verse 7 and 9.

2:13. And for this cause we also thank God without ceasing, that, when you received from us the word of God from hearing us, you accepted it no as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which also works in you that believe.

And for this cause we also thank God without ceasing, that, when you received the word of God from hearing us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which also works in you that believe.

We also thank God without ceasing draws a parallel to 1:2 which reads: “We give thanks to God always for you all, making mention of you in our prayers”.

That, when you received the word of God from hearing us, you accepted it not as the word of men, but as it is in truth, the word of God, which also works in you that believe. parallels 1:5, which reads: “How our gospel came to you not only in word, but also in power, and in the Holy spirit, and in much assurance; even as you know what manner of men we showed ourselves towards you for your sake.” The two references to “the word of God” In 2:13 also parallels 1:8-“For from you has sounded forth the word of the Lord…

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Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:3-13

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

This post opens with Father Callan’s Summary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-12 followed by his notes on verse 3-13.

THE APOSTLE’S MINISTRY AT THESSALONICA IS DEFENDED

A Summary of 1 Thess 2:1-12~After recalling the abundant spiritual fruit of the Apostles’ preaching at Thessalonica, which was due to the grace of God, St. Paul now turns to a defence of his own and of his companions’ motives and conduct while there. His Jewish opponents, who had driven the missionaries from Thessalonica, had doubtless circulated calumnies and stories about them; and so the Apostle in these verses replies to their charges. He tells how he and his helpers labored there in spite of persecution, how free they were from self- interest, and how tenderly they cared for their converts.

3. For our exhortation was not of error, nor of uncleanness, nor in deceit;
4. But as we were approved by God that the gospel should be committed to us: even so we speak, not as pleasing men, but God, who proveth our hearts. 
5. For neither have we used, at any time, the speech of flattery as you know; nor taken an occasion of covetousness, God is witness:
6. Nor sought we glory of men, neither in you, nor of others,
7. Whereas we might have been burdensome to you, as the apostles of Christ; but we became little ones in the midst of you, as a nurse cherishing her children:
8. So desirous of you, we would gladly impart unto you not only the gospel of God, but also our own souls, because you were become most dear unto us.

In these verses the Apostles’ preaching at Thessalonica is further explained. Their appeal arose not from “error” or delusion; nor was it prompted by “uncleanness,” i.e., unworthy and sordid motives and purposes, as was often the case with the worship of the heathen (e.g., the worship of Aphrodite at Corinth, where St. Paul was now writing); nor was “deceit” or fraud used to carry and enforce their message. The Apostles discharged their ministry as men “approved by God” and entrusted by Him with the preaching of the Gospel, who sought above all things to please God, the Judge of their hearts. They did not try to gain the favor of men by “flattery,” nor make their ministry the occasion of material gain or of the praise of men, though they had a right to support for their labors and to respect and honor as “apostles of Christ.” Instead of asserting their authority and making demands on the Thessalonians, the Apostles conducted themselves as children among them, and were desirous of communicating to their converts, not only the Gospel, but even their own lives, if that had been necessary. In verse 7 “little ones” (νηπιοι) is according to the best Greek reading, instead of ηπιοι, which means “gentle.” The sense is the same in either case.

1 Th 2:9. For you remember, brethren, our labor and toil: working night and day, lest we should be chargeable to any of you, we preached among you the gospel of God.
1 Th 2:10. You are witnesses, and God also, how holily and justly and without blame we have been to you that have believed:

Again St. Paul Invokes the testimony of the Thessalonlans themselves to prove the sincerity of purpose with which the Apostles preached the Gospel to them, how, namely, in addition to the fatigue of the ministry, they worked with their own hands for their temporal support, so as not to be a burden to their converts, and how blameless at the same time their conduct was.

1 Th 2:11. As you know in what manner, entreating and comforting you (as a father doth his children),
1 Th 2:12. We testified to every one of you, that you would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory.

In verse 7 above St. Paul compared his tender care of the Thessalonians to that of a nurse mother, lovingly watching over her children; and now he likens the solicitude he had for them to the vigilance of a father, exhorting, encouraging, and adjuring each and all of them to live lives worthy of the God who has called them to membership in His Church here on earth and to a participation of His unveiled glory hereafter in heaven. Such conduct on the part of the Apostles while they were at Thessalonica should convince his readers of the sincerity and purity of their aims in preaching to them.

1 Th 2:13 Therefore, we also give thanks to God without ceasing: because, when you received from us the word of the hearing of God you received it not as the word of men, but (as it is indeed) the word of God, which worketh in you that have believed.

Therefore we also, etc. The Thessalonians were witnesses of the zealous labors of the Apostles, and now the Apostles thank God for the generous response to their preaching on the part of the converts at Thessalonica. They received the Gospel through the Apostles, but they recognized it as the “word of God” Himself, and this word or divine message produced the fruits of faith in their lives.

The word of the hearing of God, i.e., the Gospel message.

In the Vulgate qui operatur should be quod operatur, to agree with the Greek, where the relative refers to “word” and not to “God.”

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:7-13

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

This post opens with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief analysis of 1 Thess chapter 2, followed by his notes on verses 7-13. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the verses he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS OF 1 THESSALONIANS CHAPTER 2
In this chapter, the Apostle adduces a variety of motives for consoling the Thessalonians, and confirming them in the faith—viz., the success of his preaching in the midst of persecutions—the nature of the doctrine preached (1 Th 2:1–3)—the purity and disinterestedness of motive which actuated him (1 Th 2:4–9)—and the sanctity of his life and conduct among them (1 Th 2:10, 11). He praises them for the zeal with which they received the word of God, and the constancy with which they persevere therein (1 Th 2:13). Finally, he expresses his great affection for them.

1Th 2:7  Whereas we might have been burdensome to you, as the apostles of Christ: but we became little ones in the midst of you, as if a nurse should cherish her children:

(And that we had no motives of avarice or ambition, is clear from the fact), that while we might, like the other Apostles of Christ, be a burthen to you for our support, or by exercising authority over you, we became like children amongst you, mild, unassuming, unconscious of our rights, like a mother nursing her own children, accommodating ourselves, to your temper and habits.

“Burdensome to you,” refers to his right to receive maintenance from them; or, according to others, to the right of exercising authority over them. This latter interpretation is followed by the Greeks; the former is, however, the more probable. “Little ones,” in the present Greek version is νήπιοι, mild, gentle—but the meaning is still the same. “As if a nurse should cherish her children”—in the Greek, τὰ ἐαυτῆς her own children. The Apostle opposes humility to the pride of false teachers. He employs a twofold metaphor, to express the feelings displayed by him in preaching the gospel to the Thessalonians. Some Expositors, in order to avoid a confusion of metaphor, connect the latter part of this with the following verse.

1Th 2:8  So desirous of you, we would gladly impart unto you not only the gospel of God but also our own souls: because you were become most dear unto us.

Thus having feelings of the liveliest affection towards you (as the mother has towards her offspring), we eagerly longed to impart to you not only the gospel of God, but also our very souls, if necessary, from no other motive except that of the purest love and affection for you.

“So desirous of you;” i.e., as desirous of you, as the nurse is of her children. He opposes charity to cupidity. What a lively picture is given here of the true Pastor of souls—at one time, clothing himself, through a spirit of accommodation to the weakness of his people, with the simplicity, humility, and meekness of children, apparently claiming no authority; at another, displaying the lively affection of a tender mother, dispensing the milk of holy doctrine in such a way, as to be prepared to give his life, and that from no motive of lucre, but purely from love and charity, co-operating with Christ in the salvation of those souls for whom our blessed Lord gave up his life;

1Th 2:9  For you remember, brethren, our labour and toil: working night and day, lest we should be chargeable to any of you, we preached among you the gospel of God.

(And how far we accommodated ourselves, like a nurse, to your weakness, you yourselves know). For you remember how we laboured and toiled, working day and night to gain sustenance, while at the same time we preached the gospel of God to you; and this labour and toil we underwent to gain a livelihood, lest we should in any way be a burthen to you.

The Apostle toiled at manual labour, for the purpose of procuring the necessaries of life, at the very time he was announcing the gospel to them. Just as St Paul and his companions remembered the work of faith and labor of love of the Thessalonians (1 Th 1:3), so too the Thessalonians remember the labor and toil of the missionaries. This is probably not just a reference to the fact that they worked to support themselves financially, but to the the burden this place on them as they attempted not to burden the Thessalonians (2 Th 3:8-9). For other references to St Paul’s manual labor see Acts 18:1-3, 20:33-35; 1 Cor 4:11-12, 9:3-18. It’s possible that St Paul emphasizes his self-employment because some in Thessalonica were becoming lazy or insinuating themselves into other people’s affairs (1 Th 3:11-12; 2 Th 3:6-12).

1Th 2:10  You are witnesses, and God also, how holily and justly and without blame we have been to you that have believed:

I call both you and God to bear testimony to the sanctity towards God, the justice towards our neighbour, the irreprehensibility towards all, that marked our conduct amongst you.

“Holily,” may also mean, in doctrine and life; “justly,” without injury of exaction; “without blame,” causing no scandal to the weak.

1Th 2:11  As you know in what manner, entreating and comforting you (as a father doth his children),

You also know how we entreated each of you (with the feelings of a father towards his children) to persevere firmly in the faith.

1Th 2:12  We testified to every one of you that you would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory.

How we consoled you in your difficulties, and earnestly besought you to lead lives worthy of the God who called you to his kingdom and his glory.

The Vulgate reading of these two verses is rather obscure. “As you know,” i.e., you also know, how we entreated each of you (as a father entreats his children), and comforted each of you, &c. The word “you” is redundant after “comforting,” in the construction adopted in the Paraphrase; a construction which, however, accords best with the Greek. “Who hath called you unto his kingdom;” i.e., his Church, where they received the Holy Ghost as a pledge of glory to come, the hopes of which should encourage them under afflictions and persecution. In the Greek version, “testified” is read in a participial form, testifying.

1Th 2:13  Therefore, we also give thanks to God without ceasing: because, that when you had received of us the word of the hearing of God, you received it not as the word of men, but (as it is indeed) the word of God, who worketh in you that have believed.

Therefore (owing to our success amongst you), we give God thanks without ceasing, that when you received from us the word of God which we preached to you, you received it not as the doctrine of men, but (what it really is) as the doctrine revealed by God, who, by the power of his grace, wrought in you the conviction of faith.

“Therefore,” all this being premised regarding his advent and success amongst them, and the purity of motive with which he preached, the Apostle now returns thanks to God for his success, and shows that his advent was not “in vain;” as he asserted (verse 1). “When you had received of us the word of the hearing of God,” i.e., the word of God which you heard from our preaching it to you. “You received it not as the word of men;” because, under the circumstances of persecution with which it was attended, they would certainly have rejected it, had they regarded it as emanating from man; but they received it as “the word of God,” who, by his grace, worked in them and made them receive his word with a firm faith. “Who worketh,” may, in the Greek construction, ὅς καὶ ενεργειται, be also rendered which works, or is worked in you, &c. There is, however, but little difference of signification between it and our Vulgate.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

TWENTY-NINTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 4:20-25. This brief post is actually on verses 13-25.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on Romans 4:20-25.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 4:20-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 4:20-25.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on the Responsorial: Luke 1:68-79. Entire canticle.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on the Responsorial: Luke 1:68-79. Entire canticle.

Navarre Bible Commentary on the Responsorial: Luke 1:68-79. Entire canticle.

Father Leopold Fonck on the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21).

St Augustine on Today’s Gospel, the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21).

Navarre Bible Commentary on the Parable of the Rich Fool (Luke 12:13-21).

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on the Danger of Riches and the Rewards of Voluntary Poverty (Matt 19:16-30; Luke 18:18-30; 12:13-34). St Joe of O Blog.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romams 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21. On 12-21.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21. On 12-21.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21. On 12-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 40.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 40.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:35-38. On 38-40.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 12:35-38.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 12:35-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:35-38.

St Augustine’s Homily on Luke 12:35. St Joe of O Blog.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary Romans 6:12-18. This post includes commentary on verses 8-18.

Father Callan’s Commentary Romans 6:12-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 6:12-18.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 124.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 124.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:39-48. This post begins with verse 35.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 12:39-48.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:39-48.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary Romans 6:19-23.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 6:19-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 6:19-23.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Commentary on Psalm 1.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 1.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 1.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 1. Latin and English side by side.

My Notes on Psalm 1.

A Lectio Divina Reading of Psalm 1.

A Jewish Medieval Commentary on Psalm 1.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:49-53.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 12:49-53.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 12:49-53.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 12:49-53.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:49-53.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 7:18-25. This post provides commentary on all of chapter 7.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 7:18-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 7:18-25.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:54-59.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 12:54-59.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:45-59.

St Augustine’s Homily on Luke 12:56, 58. St Joe of O Blog.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:1-11. This post includes commentary on verse 1-17.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:1-11. On all of chapter 8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:1-11.

Father Patrick Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 24.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 24. On verses 1-6.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 24. Latin and English side by side.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 24.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 13:1-9.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 13:1-9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 13:1-9.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 13:6-9.

St Augustine’s Homily on Luke 13:6. St Joe of O Blog.

THIRTIETH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

TWENTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

Father Rickaby’s Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 1:1-7.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:29-32.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 11:29-32. Somewhat fragmented on verses 29-36.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:29-32.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 1:16-25. On 15-25.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 1:16-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 1:16-25.

Father Rickaby’s Notes on Romans 1:16-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 1:16-25.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 19.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:37-41. On 37-46.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 11:37-41.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:37-41.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2017 this day falls on Oct. 18, the Feast of St Luke the Evangelist. The first link is to commentaries for that feast. Remaining links relate to the normal Mass of the day.

2017. Commentaries for the Feast of St Luke the Evangelist.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 2:1-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 2:1-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 2:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 2:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 62.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 62.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 62.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:42-46. On 37-46.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 11:42-46. On 42-48.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:42-46.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 3:21-30. On 21-31.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 3:21-30. On 21-31.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 3:21-30. On 21-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 3:21-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 130.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 130.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 130.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:47-54.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:47-54.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 4:1-8.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 4:1-8. On 1-12.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 4:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 4:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 32.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 32.

St John Fisher’s Commentary on Psalm 32 (31). Online book

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:1-7.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 12:1-7. On 11:52-12:7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:1-7.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18. On 13-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18. On 13-18.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18. On 13-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 4:13, 16-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 12:8-12.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 12:8-12. On 8-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 12:8-12.

TWENTY-NINTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Year A: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Twenty-Seventh Week in Ordinary Time, Week I

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 14, 2017

TWENTY-SEVENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
A suggested theme for today’s readings: God is willing to rescue the life of unbelievers and disobedient sinners from the pit (death). His threats of judgment (against the Ninevites, first reading) and his acts of judgement (against his disobedient prophet in the responsorial) are invitations to, and oriented towards, repentance. God’s people must be ready and willing to act with mercy towards anyone in need, friend or foe (Gospel reading).

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Jonah 1:1-2, 2:1-2, 11.

My Notes on Jonah 1:1-2, 2:1-2, 11.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on the Book of Jonah. St Joe of O Blog.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Exegetical Homily on Luke 10:25-37. Previously posted for the 13th Sunday after Pentecost. Begins with vs. 23.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 10:25-37. Begins with vs. 23.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 10:25-37. St Joe of O Blog.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 10:25-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 10:25-37.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Luke 10:25-37.

Homily by Bede the Venerable on Luke 10:25-37.

The Two-Fold Precept. Homily notes on Today’s Gospel can be used for homily ideas or for points of meditation or further study.

Parable of the Good Samaritan. Homily notes on Today’s Gospel can be used for homily ideas or for points of meditation or further study.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Suggested theme for today’s readings: We are all sinners and if God marks our guilt we could not stand (responsorial). This was the realization which the King of Nineveh came to when he was told the prophet’s message (first reading). Listening to God and accepting him on his terms (like the king and Mary in the Gospel reading) is absolutely essential, the one thing needful, the better part to chose (Gospel reading). Accepting him on one’s own terms, as Martha attempted to do, will get you no where with him (Gospel reading).

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Jonah 3:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Jonah 3:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 130.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 130.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 130.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 10:38-42.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 10:38-42.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 10:38-42.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 10:38-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 10:38-42.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Suggested theme for today’s reading: The Lord is “a gracious and merciful God, patient, and of much compassion, and easy to forgive evil” (first reading). Our confidence that God will hear our prayer and respond is based upon this fact (responsorial). We who so often offend God and yet rely on his compassion and mercy to forgive must be open to showing mercy and compassion towards those who sin against us (Gospel reading).

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on Jonah 4:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Jonah 4:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 86.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 86.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 86.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:1-4.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Luke 11:1-4.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:1-4.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Suggested theme for today’s readings: Blessed are those who hope in the Lord (responsorial), trusting in his goodness to respond to our needs (gospel) in spite of adversity and the seeming well-being and triumph of the wicked (first reading). The good and the evil will have their recompense (first reading, responsorial), and the good must therefore maintain hope and trust that God will respond to them with good things (first reading, gospel).

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast Study of Malachi. For episodes take you through the book.

Pending (maybe): My Notes on Malachi 3:13-20b.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Malachi 3:13-20b. This is 3:13-4:2 according to the RSVCE chapter and verse numbering.

Medieval/Patristic Commentary on Psalm 1.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 1.

My Notes on Psalm 1.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 1. Latin and English.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 1.

Lectio Divina of Psalm 1.

A Benedictine Monk’s Meditation on Psalm 1.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:5-13.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 11:5-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:5-13.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Suggested theme for today’s readings: The Lord will judge the world with justice, bringing down the wicked by their own machinations (responsorial). For this reason repentance is a must (first reading) for it puts one with God/Christ/Kingdom, not against them (gospel). It is better to stand for a night mourning in God’s house clothed in sackcloth and relinquishing food (gospel) rather than stand in armor in Satan’s palace and suffer despoilment and defeat (gospel).

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

A Brief Introduction to Joel Chapters 1 & 2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Joel 1:13-15, 2:1-2.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 9.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 9.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:15-26.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 11:15-26. On 14-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:15-26.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-SEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Joel 4:12-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 97.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 11:27-28.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 11:27-28.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 11:27-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 11:27-28.

TWENTY-EIGHTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Catholic, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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