The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for September, 2018

Father MacEvilly’s Introduction to Second Corinthians

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 29, 2018

Second Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians
Introduction

Canonicity of.—The Canonicity, or Divine authority of this Epistle, has never been called in question in the Church. Hence, in the Canon of Scriptures, it is classed among the books termed, Proto-Canonical.

There has been no difference of opinion about the language of it either. It is universally admitted to have been written in Greek.

Time and Place of.—It is generally supposed to have been written about the year 57—the same year in which the preceding Epistle was written, but a few months after it. The place where it was written is generally supposed to have been Philippi in Macedonia. This is asserted by the subscriptions of the Greek copies. Baronius states, however, that it was written from Nicopolis in Epirus.

Occasion of.—The Apostle had, in his former Epistle, promised to visit the Corinthians—a promise, however, he was prevented from fulfilling by duties of importance. And although, as he learned from Titus, whom he sent to Corinth, his former Epistle was attended with partial success; still, he was informed, that the false teachers, who insinuated themselves amongst the Corinthians, offended at the holy liberty with which they were rebuked by him, endeavoured by all means to alienate the minds of the people from him. They charged him with fickleness and irresolution—with tyranny, as instanced in his treatment of the incestuous man—with indulging in self-praise—with arrogant haughtiness in his Epistles, so ill befitting the lowliness and seeming meanness of his personal appearance and conversation, when amongst them. The Apostle defends himself against these imputations. He clears himself of the charge of fickleness, and assigns satisfactory reasons for not appearing amongst them according to his promise. He shows that his treatment of the incestuous man was attended with the most salutary results; and finding that the excommunication had the desired effect of reforming the offender, he mildly instructs them, by way of request, to remove the censure and restore him to the communion of the faithful (chapters 1, 2). He repels the charge of indulging in self-praise, by retorting upon his enemies, and by showing that unlike them, he needed no recommendation with the Corinthians; and after contrasting the Apostolic ministry with that of Moses (chap. 3), and after pointing out the exalted virtues which the Apostles practised, together with the sufferings and persecutions they underwent for the Gospel (chap. 5, 6, 7) he refutes the charge of arrogance in his Epistle, by showing, that whether absent or present he always acted consistently, always with candour and sincerity, both in his words and actions—(chapter 10).

In his own defence, and from the strictest necessity, he enumerates the manifold labours and perils he underwent in the cause of the Gospel; the success with which his efforts were crowned; and, consequently, his claims to their confidence and affection in preference to the false teachers, whom all along, in the enumeration of his own services, he indirectly censures; and whom, moreover, in several passages, depicting in their true colours, he denounces in the strongest language. And as the false teachers had endeavoured to recommend themselves by putting forward their high-sounding titles, the Apostle, in order to counteract their wicked devices, enumerates the exalted titles and heavenly favours, wherein he might justly glory—(chapters 11 and 12).

He was informed that the collection in favour of the poor of Jerusalem, which he recommended in his former Epistle, was not yet made; he, therefore, exhorts them to the zealous discharge of this meritorious duty, and instructs them to perform it with liberality, promptitude, and cheerfulness. He proposes to them, as models in this respect, the poor churches of Macedonia—(chapters, 8 and 9). Finally, he exhorts them, under pain of the severest chastisements, to correct the faults to which they were still addicted—(chapter 13).

The chief object and general scope of this Epistle may be said briefly to consist in the defence of his own conduct and apostleship against the false teachers.

Commentators remark that this Epistle may be regarded as a perfect masterpiece of that solid and impassioned eloquence for which the writings of St. Paul are so remarkable.

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June 11 Commentaries for the Memorial of St Barnabas, Apostle

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 29, 2018

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 11:21b-26, 13:1-3.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 11:21b-26, 13:1-3.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 11:21b-26, 13:1-3.

Father Boylan’s introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul IIs Commentary on  Psalm 98.

Psalm 98 and the Catholic Encyclopedia. Greek, English, Latin text of Ps. 98 hyperlinked to the CE.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:13-16.

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Commentaries for the Ascension of the Lord, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 29, 2018

NOTE: In some Diocese of the United States the Ascension is celebrated on the Following Sunday

COMMENTARIES ON THE READINGS FOR THE ASCENSION OF THE LORD

READINGS AND OFFICE: Note that the second reading allows three possible options.

Today’s Mass Readings. Please note that the second reading allows for alternatives.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 1:1-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 1:1-11.

St John Chrysostom’s Exegetical Homily on Acts 1:1-5.

St John Chrysostom’s Exegetical Homily on Acts 1:6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 1:1-11.

COMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 47:2-3, 6-7, 8-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 47.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 47.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 47.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 47.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 47.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Ephesians 1:17-23 (Alt Heb 9:24-28; 10:19-23).

Father Wilberforce’s Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23. This commentary actually begins with verse 15. It is a pdf document.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23. This commentary actully begins with verse 15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23.

Alt 2nd Reading Aquinas’ Lecture on Hebrews 9:24-28; 10:19-23.

  • On Heb. 9:23-28.
  • On Heb 10:19-23.  Link is broke, scroll down from above link

Alt 2nd Reading Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 9:24-28; 10:19-23.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 24:46-53.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 24:46-53.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Luke 24:46-53.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 24:46-53.

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Commentaries for the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

PENTECOST SUNDAY

Extended Vigil Mass.
Mass During the Day.

MONDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
The Monday after Pentecost is the Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of the Church. The first link is to commentaries for that memorial. Remaining links are for the normal Mass of the day readings.

!!! Commentaries for the Memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of the Church.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father MacEvilly’s Introduction to 2 Corinthians.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father Boylan’s introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’s Lecture on Psalm 34.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:1-12.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

St Augustine’s Book 1 on Sermon on the Mount. On Matthew 5.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

TUESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2019 this day falls on June 11, the Memorial of St Barnabas, Apostle. The first link is to commentaries for that Memorial. Remaining links are for the normal Mass of the day readings.

2019. Commentaries for the Memorial of St Barnabas, ApostleCommentaries for the Memorial of St Barnabas, Apostle.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Jaun de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:13-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 99.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 99.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 99.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:17-19.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

THURSDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction With My Notes on Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 85.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:20-26.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:20-26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 5:20-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

FRIDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’c Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 116.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 116. On verses 10-19 which covers the verse used today in the responsorial.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 116.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:27-32.

St John Chrysostom’s homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32. On 27-37.

Pending: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

SATURDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 103.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:33-37.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Commentaries for  the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

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Commentaries for the Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

EIGHTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR C

READINGS AND OFFICE:

NABRE. Used in the USA.

NJB. Used in most other English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Sirach 27:4-7.

Pending: Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 27:4-7.

Word-Sunday Notes on Sirach 27:4-7.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 92:2-3, 13-14, 15-16.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 92.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 92.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 92.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 92.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

Pending: Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

Word-Sunday Notes on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Luke 6:39-45.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:39-45.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on Luke 6:39-45. On 39-42.

Word-Sunday Notes on Luke 6:39-45.

 

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Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:39-45

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

39. And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch?
40. The disciple is not above his master: but every one that is perfect shall be as his master.
41. And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother’s eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
42. Either how canst thou say to thy brother, Brother, let me pull out the mote that is in thine eye, when thou thyself beholdest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Thou hypocrite, cast out first the beam out of thine own eye, and then shalt thou see clearly to pull out the mote that is in thy brother’s eye.

CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA. The Lord added to what had gone before a very necessary parable, as it is said, And he spake a parable to them, for His disciples were the future teachers of the world, and it therefore became them to know the way of a virtuous life, having their minds illuminated as it were by a divine brightness, that they should not be blind leaders of the blind. And then he adds, Can the blind lead the blind? But if any should chance to attain unto an equal degree of virtue with their teachers, let them stand in the measure of their teachers, and follow their footsteps. Hence it follows, The disciple is not above his master. Hence also Paul says, Be ye also followers of me, as I am of Christ (1 Cor. 1:11.). Since Christ therefore judged not, why judgest thou? for He came not to judge the world, but to shew mercy.

THEOPHYLACT. Or else, If thou judgest another, and in the very same way sinnest thyself, art not thou like to the blind leading the blind? For how canst thou lead him to good when thou also thyself committest sin? For the disciple is not above his master. If therefore thou sinnest, who thinkest thyself a master and guide, where will he be who is taught and led by thee? For he will be the perfect disciple who is as his master.

BEDE. Or the sense of this sentence depends upon the former, in which we are enjoined to give alms, and forgive injuries. If, says He, anger has blinded thee against the violent, and avarice against the grasping, how canst thou with thy corrupt heart cure his corruption? If even thy Master Christ, who as God might revenge His injuries, chose rather by patience to render His persecutors more merciful, it is surely binding on His disciples, who are but men, to follow the same rule of perfection.

AUGUSTINE. (de Qu. Ev. l. ii. q. 9.) Or, He has added the words, Can the blind, lead the blind, in order that they might not expect to receive from the Levites that measure of which He says, They shall give into thy bosom, because they gave tithes to them. And these He calls blind, because they received not the Gospel, that the people might the rather now begin to hope for that reward through the disciples of the Lord, whom wishing to point out as His imitators, He added, The disciple is not above his master.

THEOPHYLACT. But the Lord introduces another parable taken from the same figure, as follows, But why seest thou the mote (that is, the slight fault) which is in thy brother’s eye, but the beam which is in thine own eye (that is, thy great sin) thou regardest not?

BEDE. Now this has reference to the previous parable, in which He forewarned them that the blind cannot be led by the blind, that is, the sinner corrected by the sinner. Hence it is said, Or, how canst thou say to thy brother, Brother let me cast out the mote that is in thine eye, if thou seest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA. As if He said, How can he who is guilty of grievous sins, (which He calls the beam,) condemn him who has sinned only slightly, or even in some cases not at all? For this the mote signifies.

THEOPHYLACT. But these words are applicable to all, and especially to teachers, who while they punish the least sins of those who are put under them, leave their own unpunished. Wherefore the Lord calls them hypocrites, because to this end judge they the sins of others, that they themselves might seem just. Hence it follows, Thou hypocrite, first cast the beam out of thine own eye, &c.

CYRIL OF ALEXANDRIA. That is to say, first shew thyself clean from great sins, and then afterwards shalt thou give counsel to thy neighbour, who is guilty only of slight sins.

BASIL. (Hom. 9, in Hexameron.) In truth, self knowledge seems the most important of all. For not only the eye, looking at outward things, fails to exercise its sight upon itself, but our understanding also, though very quick in apprehending the sin of another, is slow to perceive its own defects.

Ver 43. For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; neither does a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.
44. For every tree is known by his own fruit. For of thorns men do not gather figs, nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes.
45. A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good; and an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart brings forth that which is evil: for of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks.

THEOPHYL; Our Lord continues the words which He had begun against the hypocrites, saying, For a good tree brings not forth corrupt fruit; i.e. as if He says, If you would have a true and unfeigned righteousness, what you set forth in words make up also in works, for the hypocrite though he pretends to be good is not good, who does evil works; and the innocent though he be blamed, is not therefore evil, who does good works.

TITUS BOS. But take not these words to thyself as an encouragement to idleness, for the tree is moved conformably to its nature but you have the exercise of free will; and every barren tree has been ordained for some good, but you were created to the good work of virtue.

ISIDORE PELEUS; He does not then exclude repentance, but a continuance in evil, which as long as it is evil cannot bring forth good fruit, but being converted to virtue, will yield abundance. But what nature is to the tree, our affections are to us. If then a corrupt tree cannot bring forth good fruit, how shall a corrupt heart?

CHRYS. But although the fruit is caused by the tree, yet, it brings to us the knowledge of the tree, because the distinctive nature of the tree is made evident by the fruit, as it follows, For every tree is know by its fruit.

CYRIL; Each man’s life also will be a criterion of his character. For not by extrinsic ornaments and pretended humility is the beauty of true happiness discovered, but by those things which a man does; of which he gives an illustration, adding, For of thorns men do not gather figs.

AMBROSE; On the thorns of this world the fig cannot be found, which as being better in its second fruit, is well fitted to be a similitude of the resurrection. Either because, as you read, The fig trees have put forth their green figs, that is, the unripe and worthless fruit came first in the Synagogue. Or because our life is imperfect in the flesh, perfect in the resurrection, and therefore we ought to cast far from us worldly cares, which eat into the mind and scorch up the soul, that by diligent culture we may obtain the perfect fruits. This therefore has reference to the world and the resurrection, the next to the soul and the body, as it follows, Nor of a bramble bush gather they grapes. Either because no one living in sin obtains fruit to his soul, which like the grape nearest the ground is rotten, on the higher branches becomes ripe. Or because no one can escape the condemnations of the flesh, but he whom Christ has redeemed, Who as a grape hung on the tree.

THEOPHYL; Or, I think the thorns and bramble are the cares of the world and the prickings of sin, but the figs and the grapes are the sweetness of a new life and the warmth of love, but the fig is not gathered from the thorns nor the grape from the bramble, because the mind still debased by the habits of the old man may pretend to, but cannot bring forth the fruits of the new man. But we must know, that as the fruitful palm tree is enclosed and supported by a hedge, and the thorn bearing fruit not its own, preserves it for the use of man, so the words and acts of the wicked wherein they serve the good are not done by the wicked themselves, but by the wisdom of God working upon them.

CYRIL; But having shown that the good and the bad man may be discerned by their works as a tree by its fruits, he now sets forth the same thing by another figure, saying, A good man out of the good treasure of his heart brings forth that which is good, and the evil man out of the evil treasure brings forth that which is evil.

THEOPHYL; The treasure of the heart is the same as the root of the tree. He therefore who has in his heart the treasure of patience and perfect love, brings forth the best fruits, loving his enemy, and doing the other things which have been taught above. But he who keeps a bad treasure in his heart does the contrary to this.

BASIL; The quality of the words shows the heart from which they proceed, plainly manifesting the inclination of our thoughts. Hence it follows, For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.

CHRYS. For it is a natural consequence when wickedness abounds within, that wicked words are breathed as far as the mouth; and therefore when you hear of a man uttering abominable things, do not suppose that there lies only so much wickedness in him as is expressed in his words, but believe the fountain to be more copious than the stream.

THEOPHYL; By the speaking of the mouth the Lord signifies all things, which by word, or deed, or thought, we bring forth from the heart. For it is the manner of the Scripture to put words for deeds.

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Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 15:54-58

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

1Co 15:54  And when this mortal hath put on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written: Death is swallowed up in victory.

54.—Then shall come to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. This is either from Isa. 25:8, where S. Paul follows the Hebrew text rather than the Septuagint, or the sense and not the words of Hosea 13:14 is given. This seems
preferable, as ver. 55 seems to be taken from the same place.

Isaiah 25:8~He will swallow up death for ever, and the Lord GOD will wipe away tears from all faces, and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth; for the LORD has spoken.(RSV)

Hosea 13:14~Shall I ransom them from the power of Sheol? Shall I redeem them from Death? O Death, where are your plagues? O Sheol, where is your destruction? Compassion is hid from my eyes. (RSV)

1Co 15:55  O death, where is thy victory? O death, where is thy sting?

This question received its first answer when Christ rose and brought back from their limbus the souls of the saints, and so rescued this part of His spoil from Hades. Cf. Anselm and Origen (Hom. xxii. in Evang.), and Augustine {Serm. 137 de Tempore). The final answer will be given at the resurrection of all, as the Apostle says here. S. Jerome, writing to Heliodorus about Nepotianus, lately dead, beautifully addresses Death, and exults over it with S. Paul. He says: ”By Hosea Heformerly sternly threatened thee: ‘O death, I will be thy plagues; O death, I will be thy destruction.’ By His death thou now art dead; by His death we live. Thou hast devoured and been swallowed up, and when thou wast tempted with the bait of the body asstimed by Christ, and thoughtest it a prey meet for thy greedyjaws, thou wast straightawaypierced within by the barbed hook. We, Thy creation, give thanks to Thee, Christ our Saviour, that when Thou wast slain Thou didst slay this our powerful foe.”

Similarly, S. Francis, when suffering from the most grievous bodily pains, found no relief but in singing the praises of God and in hearing others singing them; and, when he was reproved by Elias for devoting his last moments to joy instead of to repentance, he replied that it was not right for him to do otherwise when he knew that in a short time he should be with God. S. Reginald, one of the first companions of S. Dominic, when bidden prepare himself, according to custom, by extreme unction, for his contest with the devil, said: “I have little fear of that contest, nay, rather, I joyfully look forward to it; for long ago was I atwinted by the mother of mercy: in her I put my utmost cotifidence, and set out to her with eagerness.” S. Bernard (Serm. 26 in Cantica), speaking of the death of his brother Gerard, who in his last moments had broken out in the words of the Psalmist, “Praise the Lord of heaven; praise llim in the height,” wrote as follows : “On thee, my brother, though it was still midnight, day was dawning; the night was as bright as the day. I was summoned to behold that marvel, to see a man rejoicing in death, taunting death: ‘ O death, where is thy sting? O death, where is thy victory?’
There is no longer a sting, but a shout of victory. Man now dies singing, and in singing dies.”

1Co 15:56  Now the sting of death is sin: and the power of sin is the law.

The sting of death is sin. Theophylact says that the sting by which death chiefly hurts and pierces us is like the sting of the scorpion, which, though a tiny animal, slays by its sting. So death slays all by sin, and would be powerless without sin. Moreover, death stings and pierces us by sin and by knowledge of sin as his sting, saying to the soul, as it were: “You die; you suffer deservedly, because you have sinned.”

The power of sin is the law. Sin gains its strength chiefly through the law. The prohibitions of the law are the occasions of sin, for we always strive after what is forbidden and long for what is denied us Cf notes to Rom. viii. 8 and 13. Cf. also Theodoret, Theophylact, Ambrose, Anselm.

1Co 15:57  But thanks be to God, who hath given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Thanks be to God who hath given us the victory. I.e., over death and sin.

1Co 15:58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye steadfast and unmoveable: always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.

Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable. Viz., in the belief of the resurrection, that ye may abound in good works well pleasing to God, stirring up yourselves to them by the hope of the resurrection and of the eternal reward, knowing that your labour will not be in vain, or without its reward with the Lord. This is the force of the phrase, “in the Lord.”

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Commentaries for Lectionary Year I (Includes Commentaries for Sundays A, B, and C)

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

The new liturgical year and lectionary cycle begins on Sunday, December 2, 2018 (The First Sunday of Advent). Links to individual weeks includes both Sundays (e.g., The first week of Advent includes the 1st and 2nd Sundays; the Second week of Advent includes 2nd and 3rd Sundays, etc.). 

ADVENT SEASON

First Week of Advent.
Second Week of Advent.
Third Week of Advent.
Fourth Week of Advent.

CHRISTMAS SEASON TO EPIPHANY
Note: Traditionally Epiphany is celebrated on January 6. In the USA it is celebrated on the Sunday following January 6.

Dec. 25. Vigil Mass for the Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord (Dec 24).
Dec. 25. Mass During the Night: The Nativity of the Lord (Midnight Mass).
Dec. 25. Mass at Dawn: The Nativity of the Lord.
Dec. 25. Mass During the Day: The Nativity of the Lord.

Sunday Within the Octave of Christmas (Feast of the Holy Family). If a Sunday does not fall between Dec. 26 and Dec 31 then the Feast of the Holy Family is celebrated on Dec. 30.

Dec. 26. The Feast of St Stephen, the Church’s First Martyr.
Dec. 27. The Feast of St John, Apostle and Evangelist.
Dec 28. Feast of the Holy Innocents, Martyrs.
Dec. 29. Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas.
Dec. 30. Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas. See next note.
!!! Dec 30. Feast of the Holy Family (Non-Sunday). If a Sunday does not fall between Dec 26-31 then the Feast of the Holy Family is celebrated on this date.
Jan 1. Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God.
Jan. 2. Memorial of St Basil the Great and St Gregory Nanzianzen, Bishops and Doctors of the Church.
Jan. 3. Christmas Weekday.
Jan . 4. Memorial St Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious.
Jan. 5. Memorial of St John Nuemann, Bishop.

EPIPHANY TO THE BAPTISM OF THE LORD

Jan. 6-13. Epiphany to the Baptism of the Lord. The Baptism of the Lord closes out the holy seasons and starts Ordinary Time.

ORDINARY TIME, INCLUDING THE BAPTISM OF THE LORD
Note: Scroll down for the seasons that interrupt Ordinary Time.

First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Second Week in Ordinary Time, Week I.
Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Fifth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Sixth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Seventh Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Eighth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
In 2019 Lent begins during this week. Scroll down for Lenten season.
Ninth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Tenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I. Starts with Pentecost in 2019.
Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time, Year I. Starts with Most Holy Trinity in 2019.
Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I. Starts with Most Holy Body and Blood in 2019.
Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Eighteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Nineteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Fifth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty Sixth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Seventh Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Eighth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Twenty-Ninth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Thirty-First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Thirty-Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Thirty Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.
Thirty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I.

LENTEN SEASON

Ash Wednesday Through Second Sunday of Lent.
Second Week of Lent.
Third Week of Lent.
Fourth Week of Lent.
Fifth Week of Lent.
!!! Holy Week.

EASTER SEASON

Easter Sunday to Divine Mercy Sunday (Second Sunday of Easter).
Second Week of Easter.
Third Week of Easter.
Fourth Week of Easter.
Fifth Week of Easter.
Sixth Week of Easter. Includes Ascension Thursday.
Seventh Week of Easter. Includes Pentecost.

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Commentaries for the First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2018

THE BAPTISM OF THE LORD
We are in Year C.

Year A. Commentaries for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord.

Year B: Commentaries for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord.

Year C: Commentaries for the Baptism of the Lord.

MONDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 1:1-6~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 1:1-6.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Hebrews 1:1-6.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 1:1-6. On 1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 1:1-6.

St Cyril of Jerusalem’s 11th Catechetical Lecture. A theological lecture on Christ as the Only Begotten Son of God.

(1) St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Hebrews 1:1-2.

(2) St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentaries on Hebrews 1:3-6. On 3-8

1st Reading: Theological and Moral Themes~

The Progress of Revelation.

The Catechism on the Progress of Revelation and Jesus as the Fulness of All of Revelation.

Jesus as Revealer of the Father. Pope St John Paull II, Fides et Ratio 7-15.

The Revelation of God as Trinity Catechism. 238-248.

The Threefold Personality of God Foreshadowed in the Old Testament.

Commentaries on Psalm 97~

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

St Augustine’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

Commentaries on Mark 1:14-20~

My Notes on Mark 1:14-20.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:14-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:14-20.

Gospel Reading: Theological and Moral Themes~

The Catechism of the Catholic Church on the Kingdom of God.

How Often in Scripture the Preaching of the Kingdom of God is Recommended.

The Kingdom of God in Redemptoris Missio 12-20. Pope St John Paul II.

TUESDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 2:5-12~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:5-12.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Hebrews 2:5-12. On 5-15.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:5-12.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:5-12. On 5-13.

Aquinas’ Lectures on Hebrews 2:5-12. Two lectures encompassing 5-13

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 2:5-12.

1st Reading: Theological and Moral Themes~

The Ultimate Purpose of Creation is the Glorification of God, Secondarily, the Beatification of His Rational Creatures.

Christ as the Natural and Supernatural Head of All Creatures.

The Humble Obedience of Christ as an Example to Believers.

Commentaries on Psalm 8~

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 8.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 8.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 8.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 8.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 8.

My Notes on Psalm 8.

Commentaries on Mark 1:21-28~

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:21-28.

My Notes on Mark 1:21-28.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 1:21-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:21-28.

Gospel Reading: Theological and Moral Themes~

Exorcisms. From Catholic Encyclopedia.

Catechism of the Catholic Church on Sacramentals.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 2:14-18~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:14-18.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 2:14-18.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Hebrews 2:14-18.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 2:14-18.

1st Reading: Theological and Moral Themes~

Commentaries on Psalm 105~

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 105.

Commentaries on Mark 1:29-39~

My Notes on Mark 1:29-39.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:29-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:29-39.

THURSDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 3:7-14~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 3:7-14.

Aquinas’ Lectures on Hebrews 3:7-14. Two lectures encompassing 7-19.

Update. Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 3:7-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 3:7-14.

Commentaries on Psalm 95~

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 95.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 95.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 95.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 95.

Father Tauton’s Commentary on Psalm 95.

Commentaries on Mark 1:40-45~

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:40-45.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:40-45.

My Notes on Mark 1:40-45.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 1:40-45.

FRIDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 4:1-5, 11~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 4:1-5, 11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 4:1-5, 11.

Commentaries on Psalm 78~

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 78.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 78.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 78.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 78.

Commentaries on Mark 2:1-12~

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 2:1-12.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 2:1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 2:1-12.

SATURDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Commentaries on Hebrews 4:12-16~

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 4:12-16.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Hebrews 4:12-16.

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Hebrews 4:12-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 4:12-16.

Commentaries on Psalm 19~

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 19.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

Commentaries on Mark 2:13-17~

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 2:13-17.

Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 2:13-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 2:13-17.

SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year C

Year A: Commentaries for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

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