The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for the ‘Catholic lectionary’ Category

Commentaries for the Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on June 10, 2017

FIFTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 1:8-14, 22.

My Notes on Exodus 1:8-14, 22.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Exodus 1:1-2:10. St Joe of O Blog.  Includes treatment of part of tomorrow’s first reading.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 124.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 124.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:34-11:1.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:34-11:1.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:34-11:1.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:34-11:1.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:34-11:1.

TUESDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 2:1-15a.

My Notes on Exodus 2:1-15a.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Exodus 2:11-22. St Joe of O Blog. For the Bishop’s treatment of verses 1-10 see yesterday’s post.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 69.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 69.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:20-24.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew11:20-24.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:20-24.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 11:20-24.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 3:1-6, 9-12.

Bishop Knecht’s Pratical Commentary on Exodus 2:23-4:31.  St Joe of O Blog.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 11:25-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:25-27.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 11:25-27.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 11:25-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:25-27.

THURSDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 3:13-20.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 11:28-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 11:28-30.

FRIDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 11:10-12:14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 116.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 116.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 116. On verses 10-19 which cover today’s verses.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 12:1-8.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 12:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 12:1-8.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 12:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 12:1-8.

SATURDAY OF THE FIFTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Exodus 12:37-42.

Father Boylan’s Introduction Psalm 136.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 136: In two parts

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 12:14-21.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 12:14-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 12:14-21.

SIXTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on June 10, 2017

FOURTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 28:10-22a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 91.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 91.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 91.

Juan de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 9:18-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:18-26.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:18-26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:18-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew9:18-26.

TUESDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 32:23-33.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 17.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 17.

Patrsitic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 17.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 17.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:32-38.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 9:32-38.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:32-38.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:32-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 9:32-38.

WEDNESDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 41:55-57; 42:5-7a, 17-24a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 33.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 33.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 33.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:1-7.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:1-7.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:1-7.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:1-7.

My Notes on Matthew 10:1-7.

THURSDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 44:18-21, 23b-29, 45:1-5.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:7-15.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:7-15.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:7-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:7-15.

FRIDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 46:1-7, 28-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 37.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 37.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:16-23.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:16-23.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:16-23.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:16-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:16-23.

SATURDAY OF THE FOURTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 49:29-32, 50:15-26a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:24-33.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:24-33.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:24-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 10:24-33.

FIFTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Galatians 1:11-20

Posted by Dim Bulb on June 10, 2017

This post opens with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief analysis of Galatians 1 followed by his commentary on verses 11;20. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the scripture he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS

The Apostle commences this Epistle by commending his own Apostolic authority. This line of defence was for him a duty of necessity, and was forced upon him by the false teachers, who, the more effectually to unsettle the faith of the Gentile converts in the sound doctrines which they had heard from his lips, questioned his Apostolic commission, and insisted that he should be disregarded, as he was but the disciple of the other Apostles, from whose practice, in reference to the Jewish ceremonial law, he differed. In order to guard the Galatians against the dangerous consequences of such false insinuations, the Apostle puts forward his immediate call by Christ himself (verse 1). After the usual Apostolic salutation, he prepares to enter on the subject of the Epistle, by ascribing our justification to the merits of Christ, in which it is insinuated, that it is from him, and not from the ceremonies of the Mosaic Law, it comes (2–5). He expresses the occasion of his writing this Epistle, and shows the unchangeable truth of the doctrine which he himself taught them, and denounces all persons presuming to teach otherwise (6–9). Knowing how calculated strong language of this sort would be to offend those against whom it was directed, he says, he has no desire to please men and, therefore, no desire to use bland conciliatory language; for, if he were to seek the applause of men, as the false teachers do, he would never have become a Christian (10–11). He employs the remainder of the chapter in fully refuting the calumny of such as said that he received his Gospel from other men. And from the history of his life, both before and after his conversion, he shows how foolish it is to say that he could either have received, or learned it, from any mortal man living. Hence, he received it from the abundant grace of the Holy Ghost, and immediately, without human intervention, from Christ himself.

11 For I give you to understand, brethren, that the gospel which was preached by me is not according to man.

But, it is God whom I am endeavouring to please, and before him, and not before men, I am pleading my cause. For, I wish to make known to you, that it is from God that I receive the gospel which I preach, and that it is not from man, nor is it in any respect human.

He proves that it was not before man, but before God, that he was pleading his cause; since the gospel which he preached was from God, and nowise human.

12 For neither did I receive it of man: nor did I learn it but by the revelation of Jesus Christ.

For neither did I receive it at once, nor did I learn it gradually, from any man, but I received it immediately from the revelation of Jesus Christ.

He proves in the following verses that he neither “received” the gospel at once, nor “learned it” by degrees, from any man, since he employed both physical and moral means for the destruction of the same gospel.

13 For you have heard of my conversation in time past in the Jews’ religion: how that, beyond measure, I persecuted the church of God and wasted it.

For, that I would not submit to be taught the gospel by any man, must be clear to you, who have heard of my mode of living while formerly professing the Jewish religion. You must have heard of the violent measures I resorted to, for the purpose of persecuting the faithful, and of totally destroying the Church of God.

He had recourse to violent measures in persecuting the faithful. He could not, therefore, have been instructed by them. He would not submit to any such process.

14 And I made progress in the Jew’s religion above many of my equals in my own nation, being more abundantly zealous for the traditions of my fathers.

You also heard of my progress in the knowledge of the Jewish religion, in which I outstripped my equals of my own religious belief, as I did in my excessive zeal for the laws and institutions handed down to me by my fathers.

Again, he employed all possible moral means to destroy the Church, as was evinced by his zeal for the law of his fathers, in the knowledge, as well as in the zealous defence of which, he far outstripped his contemporaries, even of his own nation.

15 But when it pleased him who separated me from my mother’s womb and called me by his grace,

But when it pleased God (who gratuitously singled me out, and predestined me from my mother’s womb, and through a singular grace mercifully called me),

“Pleased him.” The common Greek text has, “pleased God,” the word “God” is not found in the Vatican MS. “Who separated me,” &c. This beginning of time in reference to St. Paul, is employed to express the eternity, without beginning, from which God had predestined him.

16 To reveal his Son in me, that I might preach him among the Gentiles: immediately I condescended not to flesh and blood.

To reveal to me his Son and the knowledge of his heavenly truths, for the purpose of proclaiming him to the Gentiles, I complied at once, without consulting, or conferring with, any man living.

“To reveal,” &c. This is connected with the words, “when it pleased him,” or, as the common Greek text has it, when it pleased God.… to reveal to me his Son, &c. Others connect these words with the entire preceding verse—When it pleased God who separated me from my mother’s womb, and called me to his grace, to reveal his Son (when it pleased him, I say), that I should preach him among the Gentiles, I immediately condescended not, &c. The Greek admits of either connexion. “Immediately I condescended not,” προσανεθεμην, &c., i.e., I complied at once, without consulting or holding communication with any man living.

17 Neither went I to Jerusalem, to the apostles who were before me: but I went into Arabia, and again I returned to Damascus.

Neither did I repair to Jerusalem for the purpose of conferring with those who were called before me to the apostleship; but I went at once to Arabia, and again returned to Damascus.

“I went to Arabia” Of course, it is understood from the entire context and verse 16, that he did so for the purpose of preaching the Gospel; for his scope in this passage, is to prove that he preached the Gospel without being sent by any Apostle, nay before he saw any other of the Apostles. The same appears from Acts, 9:20.

18 Then, after three years, I went to Jerusalem to see Peter: and I tarried with him fifteen days.

I afterwards, after the lapse of three years, went up to Jerusalem for the purpose of waiting on Peter, the chief of the Apostles, and paying him, as such, a complimentary visit; and I remained with him only fifteen days.

He stopped with St. Peter only fifteen days, a period too short to learn the Gospel from him. The Greek word for “see,” ἱστορῆσαι, signifies to visit for the purpose of making his acquaintance:—it implies paying a visit of respect.

Is it not said in the Acts (9:26), that after his conversion St. Paul fled to Jerusalem from Damascus? Yes; but it is added, “after many days elapsed” (verse 23), which may refer to the “three years” mentioned here. It may also be replied with St. Jerome, that although St. Paul had come to Jerusalem after flying from Damascus, immediately after his conversion, he came there, not to consult the Apostles, which is the only thing he asserts here, but from necessity, to save himself.

19 But other of the apostles I saw none, saving James the brother of the Lord.

I saw none other of the Apostles, excepting James, the son of Mary Cleophas, who was sister to the Blessed Virgin.

. James, the son of Cleophas, was cousin to our Redeemer; and hence, by a Hebrew usage, called his “brother.”

20 Now the things which I write to you, behold, before God, I lie not.

All these things I assert on the solemn assurance of an oath, of which I make God the witness.

Fr. MacEvilly offers no comment on this verse except for the paraphrase.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Notes on Galatians, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Thirteenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on June 10, 2017

THIRTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2017 this day falls on July, 3, the Feast of St Thomas the Apostle. The first link is to commentaries on the readings for that feast. Remaining links are to the regular readings.

 

2017. Feast of St Thomas the Apostle.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 18:16-33.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’ Notes on Psalm 103.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:18-22.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:18-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:18-22.

St Augustine on Matthew 8:18-22. St Joe of O blog.

TUESDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 19:15-29.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 26..

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27. On 18-27.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 8:23-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:23-27.

St Augustine on Matthew 8:23-27. St Joe of O Blog.

WEDNESDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 21:5, 8-20a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:28-34.

Pending: Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:28-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:28-34.

THURSDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 22:1b-19.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 115. On 114 and 115.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 115.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 115.

My Notes on Psalm 115.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:1-8.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 9:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:1-8.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 9:1-8.

FRIDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 23:1-4, 19; 24:1-8, 62-67.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:9-13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:9-13.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:9-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 9:9-13.

SATURDAY OF THE THIRTEENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 27:1-5, 15-29.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 135.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 135.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 135.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 9:14-17.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 9:14-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 9:14-17.

Pending: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 9:14-17.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 9:14-17.

FOURTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
We are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, A, B & C
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

MONDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 12:1-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 33.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 33.

St Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:1-5.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 7:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:1-5.

TUESDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 13:2, 5-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 15.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 15.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 15. Ps 14 in Thomas’ Psalter.

St Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 15.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:6, 12-14.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 15:1-12, 17-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 105.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 105.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 105.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:15-20.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:15-20.

THURSDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: in 2017 this day falls on June 29, the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul. The first two links below relate to it; the remaining links are for the regular Mass of the day.

2017. Vigil: Commentaries for the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul.

2017. Mass During the Day: Commentaries for the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 16:1-12, 15-16.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 106).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 7:21-29.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 7:21-29.

FRIDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 17:1, 9-10, 15-22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 128.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Pending: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 8:1-4.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:1-4.

SATURDAY OF THE TWELFTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Genesis 18:1-15.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Responsorial.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Update: Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Update: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Pending: Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 8:5-17.

THIRTEENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

READINGS:

NABRE. Used in the USA.

NJB. Use in most English speaking countries.

THEMES:

Suggestions for Homilies, Bible Study and Discussion Groups.

Doctrinal Homily Outlines. At the time I post this the outline isn’t available, so I’ve linked to the archive page where it will be listed when available.

Lector Works. “A series of thoughts about the lectionary readings of the day, as an oral proclamation within the church’s public prayer, and how the writer would want to have them declared and received effectively.” Identifies a “central point” for each reading and a suggested “message for our assembly.”

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: 2 Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a.

Haydock Bible Commentary on 2 [4] Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a. Following the LXX and Vulgate this commentary designates 2 Kings as 4 Kings. In these translations 1 & 2 Samuel were designated as 1 & 2 Kings, while what we today call 1 & 2 Kings were called 3 & 4 Kings.

Pending: Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Kings 4:8-11, 14-16a.

Cambridge Bible Commentary. Protestant. The excerpt has no theological issues to concern Catholics.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 89:2-3, 16-17, 18-19

Father Boylan’s Commentary on Psalm 89.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 89.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 89.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 89.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 6:3-4, 8-11.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-4, 8-11. On 3-11.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 10:37-42

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 10:37-42. On 10:34-11:1.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Catholic Sunday Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 6:3-11

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

This post begins with Fr. MacEvilly’s brief analysis of all of chapter 6, followed by his notes on verses 3-11. Text in purple indicates his paraphrasing of the verses he is commenting on.

ANALYSIS OF ROMANS 6

In this chapter, the Apostle answers an objection to which his doctrine in the preceding (verse 20), might give rise (1). From the very rite of baptism, he shows that we should no longer commit sin; on the contrary, we should lead a new life of grace; for the rite of immersion practised in his time in baptism, was a type of our death to sin, and the egress from the waters of baptism was a type of our spiritual resurrection, both of which were effected, as well as signified, by the sacrament of baptism; and both had the death and resurrection of Christ for models (2–9). He next shows, from the very nature of Christ’s death, which took place but once, and of his resurrection, which was the entrance to an immortal life, that we, too, after his example, should persevere in a life of grace (9–11). He exhorts to a life of sanctity (11–20). He points out the present and future fruits of a life of sin and of a life of grace.

Rom 6:3  Know you not that all we who are baptized in Christ Jesus are baptized in his death?

For that we are dead to sin, you may clearly see, by calling to mind what you already know, viz., that when we are baptized in the name and by the authority of Jesus Christ, we are baptized into the likeness and representation of his death.

He now proves that they are dead to sin, since by being “baptized in Christ Jesus,” in the Greek, εἰς Χριστὸν Ἰησοῦν, into Christ Jesus, i.e., by professing ourselves followers of Christ in the rite of baptism. In the Codex Vaticanus, the word “Jesus” is wanting, it simply is, “baptized unto Christ.” “Are baptized in his death”; in the Greek, εἰς τὸν θάνατον, into his death, i.e., into the likeness and representation of his death. So that his death on the cross would be represented by our death to sin, of which the baptism by immersion—the form of baptism in use in the time of the Apostle—was a significant type; and this death to sin on our part is effected by baptism, since, according to the doctrine of St. Thomas, the sacraments operate what they signify.

Rom 6:4  For we are buried together with him by baptism into death: that, as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we also may walk in newness of life.

For, in order vividly to represent his death, we have been buried with him in the baptismal rite of immersion. So that as Christ has been resuscitated from the grave by the glorious operation of his Father’s power, we also, emerging from the baptismal waters, would lead a new life, as he did after his resurrection, and continue perseveringly in it.

He shows how our spiritual death to sin is signified by baptism. For, our immersion in baptism is a type of our burial, and, consequently, of our death to sin, of which his death on the cross was the model. “For we are buried together with him by baptism,” his burial, and, consequently, his death, being the model of our burial and death to sin, signified by our immersion in the waters of baptism. In all the Greek copies we have, οὖν, therefore, instead of “for.” “Into death,” to represent his death, which must precede burial. “That as Christ is risen from the dead by the glory of the Father,” i.e., by the glorious operation of the Father’s power, to enter on a new and immortal life, we too, after emerging from the waters of baptism, which is a type of our spiritual resurrection, would, like Christ, risen from the grave—our resuscitated model—enter on a new and holy life. As the death of Christ is the model of our death to sin, so is his resurrection from the tomb the model of our spiritual resurrection, and both signified by the rite of baptism, then conferred by immersion.

Rom 6:5  For if we have been planted together in the likeness of his death, we shall be also in the likeness of his resurrection.

For, if, like young shoots, we have been engrafted on him by baptism, so as to represent, by our death to sin, his death on the cross, we shall certainly, for a like reason, be engrafted also unto the likeness of his resurrection, which will be effected by our leading a new life of grace, after the model of his glorious and immortal life.

He shows why we should walk in the newness of life, or become assimilated to Christ in his resurrection; for, our assimilation to him in our spiritual death, was not to rest there. Baptism not only represented and effected our spiritual death to sin—for this was but one spiritual effect signified and caused by baptism—but it also signified and effected our resurrection to a new life, in which we are to live after the model of Christ resuscitated from the grave. Our death to sin was the precursor of our new life of grace. Hence, if we die with Christ, with much greater reason shall we rise with him. “Planted together with him,” συμφυτοι γεγοναμεν; there is allusion in these words to the grafting of young shoots on the stock of another tree: Christ is the stock of the true and faithful vine on which we must be engrafted, to die with him to sin, and to live with him to grace, as the young graft participates in all the vicissitudes of the stock on which it is inserted. The nutriment we derive from our insertion on him, will not be merely confined to our dying to sin; it is intended to produce in us the fruits of a new and spiritual life.

Rom 6:6  Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with him, that the body of sin may be destroyed, to the end that we may serve sin no longer.

We should die to sin and live a new life of grace, if we consider that in baptism, our old man, i.e., the corruption of nature, which we inherited from Adam, is crucified with Christ, so that the whole mass, or body of sin consisting of different members, may be destroyed, and we may no longer serve as slaves under the tyranny of sin.

From the end of baptism he shows that we should be dead to sin, and walk in the newness of life (verse 4); for, while baptism represents the crucifixion of Christ, it also signifies and effects the crucifixion of our vices. “Our old man,” i.e., the sinfulness and corruption inherited from Adam, or rather man himself, as affected by this sinfulness. The Apostle distinguishes two men, the old and the new. The “old man was crucified” with Christ; for, in his person “who was made for us a malediction,” the entire fallen race of Adam was nailed to the cross. “That the body of sin,” i.e., the entire mass or collection of sins—the members of which collection are uncleanness, avarice, &c. (Colossians, 3). They are called a body, because as different members joined together constitute a body, so all the particular sins committed by the “old man” constitute a “body” also; in using the word body, the Apostle carries with him the idea of crucifixion, and alludes to the body of man after he fell in Adam, before he was renewed in Christ. This corrupt body was made by man the instrument of indulging his concupiscences. “May be destroyed,” by mortifying and restraining its members, “and may serve sin no longer.” “Sin” is represented as a tyrant exercising dominion over us.

Rom 6:7  For he that is dead is justified from sin.

For, as the dead slave is freed from servitude, so are we, who are dead to sin by baptism, freed from its tyranny; and hence, we should no longer serve it.

He continues to represent sin as a tyrant exercising sway—“is justified from sin?” “justified” is taken in a legal sense to signify acquitted, fully absolved, so as not to be again questioned on that account.

Rom 6:8  Now, if we be dead with Christ, we believe that we shall live also together with Christ.

But if we be really dead to sin with Christ, we have a firm hope and confidence, that one day we shall enjoy with Christ a glorious and immortal life.

“We believe,” i.e., we confidently hope, “we shall live together with Christ.” These words are understood by Estius to refer to our living a life of grace after the model of His glorious and immortal life. The interpretation in the Paraphrase, which makes it refer to our living with him one day a life of glory in heaven, is, however, to be preferred; for, the Apostle would appear to take occasion, from treating of the life of grace, to refer to the reward of future glory, as a means of stimulating men to the practice of virtue. The opinion of Estius, however, derives great probability from the meaning given to the words, alive unto God, verse 11, where the foregoing example is applied.

Rom 6:9  Knowing that Christ, rising again from the dead, dieth now no more. Death shall no more have dominion over him.

As we know that Christ, resuscitated from the tomb, dies no more, death has no further dominion over him he (enjoys a glorious and immortal life, free from all the ills of mortality).

These words show that Christ, now risen, shall live for ever; and hence, as we are to live with him, we are to enjoy an immortal life. The connexion is more easily seen in the interpretation of Estius: “We shall live also together with Christ,” (verse 8). But what life is that?—an unceasing, continuous life of grace; for such is its model—the life of Christ resuscitated from the tomb; or, perhaps, it might be more probably said, that this verse has no immediate connexion with the foregoing; but that in it is merely introduced a new reason for persevering in grace—founded on the mode of Christ’s death and resurrection. From the very nature, the oneness, of Christ’s resurrection, he shows our obligation to persevere in good, and not relapse again into the state of sin.

Rom 6:10  For in that he died to sin, he died once: but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.

For, so far as his death is concerned, it took place but once for the expiation of sin, but as to his life, it is altogether employed for the glory of God.

“He died to sin, he died once,” i.e., he died one death to expiate and atone for sin. In the common Greek, the punctuation is so placed that the words “to sin” are joined to “once,” thus, “he died to sin once.” The punctuation in the Codex Vaticanusὅ γὰρ απεθανεν, τῆ αμαρτία, απεθανεν εφαπαξ,” leaves the matter doubtful. “But he liveth unto God,” i.e., solely for God’s glory; and hence, our life of grace should be devoted to the same; or, the words, “unto God,” may mean, he lived a life worthy of God, immortal and unchangeable.

Rom 6:11  So do you also reckon that you are dead to sin, but alive unto God, in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

So do you, therefore, after his example, regard yourselves as dead to sin by baptism, and gifted with an unchanging, unfading life of grace, to be wholly devoted to the promotion of God’s glory, through the grace and merits of Jesus Christ our Lord.

He applies the foregoing, and founds on it the exhortation to sanctity of life. Hence, we should regard ourselves after baptism as dead once and for ever to sin, and living, like Christ, solely for God, performing all the actions of our life solely for the end of advancing his glory.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Notes on Romans, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST
(Corpus Christi)

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood (Corpus Christi).

MONDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:38-42.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Today’s Gospel (Matt 5:38-42). St Joe of O Blog. On verses 17-48. Covers tomorrow’s gospel too.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:38-42.

TUESDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 8:1-9.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:43-48.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48. St Joe of O Blog. On verses 17-48. Posted yesterday also.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:43-48.

WEDNESDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Pending: R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 9:6-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18. St Joe of O Blog.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:1-6, 16-18.

THURSDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 111.

Pope Benedict’s Commentary on Psalm 111.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15. St Joe of O Blog.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:7-15.

St Augustine’s Sermon on the Lord’s Prayer.

FRIDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:18, 21-30. On 16-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 11:18, 21-30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:19-23.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23. St Joe of O Blog. On 19-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:19-23.

SATURDAY OF THE ELEVENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Pending: Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

Pending: Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Today’s Responsorial (Ps 34).

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 6:24-34.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 6:24-34.

SUNDAY OF THE TWELFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, A, B & C
Note: we are in Year A

Year A: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year B: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Year C: Commentaries for the Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

MONDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father MacEvilly’s Introduction to 2 Corinthians.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:1-7.

Father Boylan’s introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine Notes on Psalm 34.

St Thomas Aquinas’s Lecture on Psalm 34.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:1-12.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

St Augustine’s Book 1 on Sermon on the Mount. On Matthew 5.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:1-12.

TUESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 1:18-22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 119.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Jaun de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:13-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:13-16.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:4-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 99.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 99.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 99.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:17-19.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:17-19.

THURSDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 3:15-4:1, 3-6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction With My Notes on Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 85.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:20-26.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Today’s Gospel Matthew 5:20-26.

FRIDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

R.D. Byles’ Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father MacEvilly’c Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 2 Corinthians 4:7-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 116.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 116. On verses 10-19 which covers the verse used today in the responsorial.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 116.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:27-32.

Pending: Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 5:27-32.

SATURDAY OF THE TENTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5:14-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 103.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 5:33-37.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 5:33-37.

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST
(Corpus Christi)

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood (Corpus Christi).

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Ninth Week in Ordinary Time (Includes Pentecost & Most Holy Trinity)

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 28, 2017

PENTECOST SUNDAY

Extended Vigil Mass.
Mass During the Day.

MONDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 1:3, 2:1-8.

Overview of the Book of Tobit, chapters 1-3.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:1-12.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:1-12.

TUESDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 2:9-14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 112.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 112.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 112.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:13-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:13-17.

WEDNESDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 3:1-11a, 16-17a.

Father Berry’s Introduction and Notes on Psalm 25.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 25. On verses 1-9 which includes the verses used in the responsorial.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 25.

My Notes on Psalm 25. These notes cover verses 1-14 and so include the verses chosen for today’s responsorial.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:18-27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:18-27.

THURSDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Commentary on Tobit 6:10-11; 7:1bcde, 9-17; 8:4-9a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 12:28-34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:28-34.

FRIDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Tobit 11:5-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:35-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:35-37.

SATURDAY OF THE NINTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Tobit 12:1, 5-15, 20.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on the Responsorial. Covers Tobit 13:1-8.

Father Cornelius a Lapides’ Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 12:38-44.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 12:38-44.

SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: