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Archive for the ‘Scripture’ Category

Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 22, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Mass Readings (NABRE). Used in the USA.

Mass Readings (NJB). Used in most other English speaking countries.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Isaiah 35:4-7a.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Isaiah 35:4-7a. Actually on verses 1-10.

Word-Sunday Notes on Isaiah 35:4-7a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Isaiah 35:4-7a.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 146:7, 8-9, 9-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 146.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

Word-Sunday Notes on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146. On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: James 2:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on James 2:1-5.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on James 2:1-5.

Word-Sunday Notes on James 2:1-5.

Pending: My Notes on James 2:1-5.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 7:31-37.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 7:31-37.

Word-Sunday Notes on Mark 7:31-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:31-37.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 7:31-37.

GENERAL RESOURCES: Individual sites that usually deal with the readings as a whole.

Sacred Page Blog: Jesus the Reverse Psychologist. Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma give his reflection on this Sunday’s readings.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Wednesday Word.  I’m not sure why it’s called “The Wednesday Word” since it deals with the Sunday readings. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo Parish’s Bible Study Notes. Notes on all the readings, usually with some background info as well.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES ON THE GOSPEL: Mark 7:31-37.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on the Gospel.

St Ambrose on the Healing of the Deaf Man. The act influenced ancient baptismal liturgies, and the reading has often been used for baptismal catechesis.

St Anthony the Abbot on Watchfulness of the Tongue.

St Ephraim the Syrian On the Evils of the Tongue and Similar Vices. Go to page 4 of the book displayed (page 26 in the pdf document).

Abuse of Speech. Homily on the Gospel by Fr. Agustine Wirth, O. S.B., a famed preacher of his day.

On Conformity to the Will of God. Gospel homily by Fr. Wirth.

Homily on the Gospel. By Bishop Bonomelli.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Homily Notes on the Gospel.

Spiritual Deafness and Dumbness. On the Gospel.

Healing Spiritual Deafness and Dumbness. On the Gospel.

PODCASTS: Commentaries, homilies, reflections, etc.

Father Francis Martin’s Reflections on the Sunday Readings. A video in 4 parts, each approximately 15 minutes long. The last three deal with the readings, the first is introductory. The link may be time sensitive.

(1) St Martha’s Parish Bible Study Podcast. Usually looks at the readings in some detail.

(2) St Martha’s Parish Bible Reflections.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Brief overview of the readings. Usually does a good job of highlighting the major theme(s). Text available.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Scroll down and click on the link “chapters 6-7.”

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 21, 2015

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Today’s 1st Reading (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18). On 13-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:16-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:16-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Luke 4:16-30.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 4:16-30. St Joe of O Blog. On Luke and the parallels in the other gospels.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:16-30. Begins at 14.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-11.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11. On 1-13.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6. Verses 9-11 pending.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6, 9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 27.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 27.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 27.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 27.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:31-37.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:31-37.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 4:31-37. St Joe of O Blog. On 31-44 and the parallels in Mark & Matthew.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:31-37.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on Colossians 1:1-8. Read lectures 1-1 & 1-2.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 52.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 52.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 52.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 4:38-44.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 4:38-44.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 4:38-44.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:9-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:9-14.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 5:1-11.

My Notes on Luke 5:1-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 5:1-11.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 5:1-11.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:15-20. Lectures 4 & 5 of chapter 1.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:15-20.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 100.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 100.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 100.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 5:33-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 5:33-39.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-SECOND WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23. On 21-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Colossians 1:21-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Colossians 1:21-23.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 54.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 54.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 54.

My Notes on Psalm 54:3-4, 6, 8. On verses 3-9.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 6:1-5.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 6:1-5.

TWENTY-THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 15, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings in the New Revised American Bible. Used in the USA.

Readings in the New Jerusalem Bible.  Used in most other English speaking countries. Scroll down slightly to find. For some reason the Epistle reading follows after the Gospel.

Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Deuteronomy 4:1-2, 6-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Pending: My Notes on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Homilist’s Catechism on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

Haydock Bible Commentary on Deut 4:1-2, 6-8.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 15:2-3, 3-4, 4-5.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 15.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 15.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 15. On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27. On 17-27.

My Notes on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27. On 17-27.

Homilist’s Catechism on James 1:17-18, 21b-22, 27.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Mk 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Homilist’s Catechism on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23.

Speaking of Scripture Blog. An excerpt from Mary Healy’s Commentary on Mark, part of the new series Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture. Healy is one of the co-editors.

GENERAL RESOURCES: On the readings as a whole. Commentaries on individual readings further below.

Word Sunday. The readings in both and literal translation, notes on the text, podcast, children’s reading.

Sacerdos.  Gives the theme of the readings, the doctrinal message, and pastoral application.

Lector Notes. Brief historical and theological background on the readings. Can be printed out, copied, and used as bulletin insert.

The Bible Workshop. Links to several relevant articles, contains a reading guide to the gospel text, a comparison of the readings, suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily).

The Wednesday Word.  I’m not sure why it’s called “The Wednesday Word” since it deals with the Sunday readings. Designed for prayer and reflection, the pdf document ends with Father Dom Henry Wansbrough’s reflections on the first and second readings. Fr. Wansbrough is General Editor of the New Jerusalem Bible and contributed commentaries on Matt, Mark, and the Pastorals in A New Catholic Commentary on Holy Scripture.

St Charles Borromeo’s Parish Bible Study Notes.

Father Francis Martin’s Reflections on the Readings. Week 22 not yet posted. A video in 4 parts, each approximately 15 minutes long. The last three deal with the readings, the first is introductory. The link may be time sensitive.

Update: Faithfulness to the Word of God. From Catholic biblical scholar Dr. John Bergsma of the Sacred Page Blog.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-First Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 9, 2015

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Commentaries for the Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
Note in 2015 this day falls on August 24, The Feast of St Bartholomew, Apostle. The first link is to commentaries for that day; the remaining links are for the ordinary readings.

Commentaries for the Feast of St Bartholomew.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10. On 1-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5, 8b-10.

Homily 1~St John Chrysostom on 1 Thessalonians 1:1-5. On 1-7.

Homily 2~St John Chrysostom on 1 Thessalonians 1:8-10.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm149.

Patrisitic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:13-22.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:13-22.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 2:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 139.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 139.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 139.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:23-26.

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:23-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:23-26.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 2:9-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 139.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 139.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 139.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:27-32.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father Haydock’s Notes on Matthew 23:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 3:7-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 90.

Pending: St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 90.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Today’s Responsorial (Psalm 90).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 23:27-32.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:27-32.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

My Notes on  Thessalonians 4:1-8. On 1-12, thus incorporating tomorrow’s first reading as well.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8. On 1-11, thus incorporating tomorrow’s first reading as well.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 97.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 97.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 97.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 25:1-13.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 25:1-13.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTY-FIRST WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME
In 2015 this day falls on the Memorial of the Passion of St John the Baptist. The first link is to commentaries for that memorial. The remaining links are for the regular Saturday.

Memorial of the Passion of St John the Baptist.

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11. On 1-11, thus incorporating yesterday’s first reading as well.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:91-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 25:14-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 25:14-30.

TWENTY-SECOND SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Commentaries for the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Next Week’s Posts.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Commentaries for the Memorial of the Passion of St John the Baptist

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 9, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11. On 1-11.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

My Notes on 1 Thessalonians 4:91-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Thessalonians 4:9-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Mark 6:17-29 (and Matt 14:1-2).

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 6:17-29.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 6:17-29.

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August 24~Commentaries for the Feast of St Bartholomew

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 9, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Revelation 21:9b-14.

My Notes on Revelation 21:9b-14. On verses 10-14, 22-23.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 145.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 145.

Pope Benedict XVI’s Commentary on Psalm 145.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on John 1:45-51.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 1:45-51. On 34-51.

My Notes on Today’s Gospel (John 1:45-51).

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:45-51.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:45-51.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:45-51.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:45-51.

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Commentaries for the Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 9, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Readings in the Revised New American Bible. Used in U.S.A.

Readings in the New Jerusalem Bible. Used in most other English speaking countries. Scroll down slightly to find. For some reason the Epistle reading follows after the Gospel.

Divine Office.

Daily Office (Anglican Use). ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Joshua 24:1-2a, 15-17, 18b.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Joshua 24:1-2a, 15-17, 18b.

My Notes on Joshua 24:1-2a, 15-17, 18b.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Ps 34:2-3, 16-17, 18-19, 20-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 34.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 34. Entire psalm.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 34. On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Eph 5:21-32.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Ephesians 5:21-32. Includes vs. 33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Ephesians 5:21-32.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Ephesians 5:21-32. Includes vs. 33.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Ephesians 5:21-32. Includes vs. 33.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: John 6:60-69.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on John 6:60-69.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 6:60-69. On 60-71 actually.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 6:60-69.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 6:60-69.

PODCASTS:

EWTN’s Podcast Study of Ephesians. Listen to episode 11.

EWTN’s Podcast Study of John. Listen to episode 6.

St Martha’s Podcast Study of the Readings. Looks at all the readings in some detail.

St Martha’s Podcast Reflections.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast on John. Listen to episode on 6:43-7:31.

The Bread From Heaven. Study of John 6 from St Irenaeus Ministries.

(1) Father Robert Barron’s Homily: You Got To Serve Somebody.

(2) Fr. Robert Barron’s Homily: Really, Truly, Substantially Present. The noted theologian and speaker looks at the Gospel teaching.

 

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Commentaries for the Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 8, 2015

TWENTIETH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, YEAR B

Commentaries for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B.

Last Week’s Posts.

MONDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Judges 2:11-19.

Update: My Notes on Judges 2:11-19.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 106.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 106.

Juan de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 19:17.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22. On 16-30. Also posted under tomorrow’s resources.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 19:16-22.

TUESDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Judges 6:11-24a.

My Notes on Judges 6:11-24a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 85.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 85.

My Notes on Psalm 85. Opens with Fr. Boylan’s introduction.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 19:23-30.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 19:23-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 19:23-30.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 19:23-30.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 19:23-30. On 16-30. Also listed under yesterday’s posts.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 19:23-30.

St Augustine’s First Homily on Matthew 19:28.

St Augustine’s Second Homily on Matthew 19:28.

WEDNESDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Judges 9:6-15.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 21.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 21.

Father Berry’s Commentary on Psalm 21.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 21.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 20:1-16.

Father Fonck’s Commentary on Matthew 20:1-16.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 20:1-16.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 20:1-16.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 20:1-16.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 20:1-16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 20:1-16.

THURSDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Resources.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Judges 11:29-39a.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 40.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 40:5, 7-8a, 8b-9, 10. Includes a note on verse 2.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 22:1-14.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 22:1-14.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 22:1-14.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 22:1-14.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 22:1-14.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 22:1-14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 22:1-14.

FRIDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Ruth 1:1, 3-6, 14b-16, 22.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 146.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 146.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 146.

My Notes on Psalm 146.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 22:34-40.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 22:34-40.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 22:34-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 22:34-40.

SATURDAY OF THE TWENTIETH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readigns.

Today’s divine office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Ruth 2:1-3, 8-11; 4:13-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 128.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 128.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 128.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 128.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 23:1-12.

TWENTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

Commentaries for the Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time.

Next Week’s Posts.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Daily Catholic Lectionary, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 22:2-14

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2015

ON THE WORDS OF THE GOSPEL, MATTHEW 22:2, ETC., ABOUT THE MARRIAGE OF THE KING’S SON; AGAINST THE DONATISTS, ON CHARITY. DELIVERED AT CARTHAGE IN THE RESTITUTA

Restitua: The great Church in Carthage where the bodies of the Martyr Sts. Perpetua and Felicitas lay.

1. ALL the faithful (Baptized fideles.) know the marriage of the king’s son, and his feast, and the spreading of the Lord’s Table is open to them all who will. But it is of importance to each one to see how he approaches, even when he is not forbidden to approach It. For the Holy Scriptures teach us that there are two feasts of the Lord; one to which the good and evil come, the other to which the evil come not. So then the feast, of which we have just now heard when the Gospel was being read, has both good and evil guests. All who excused themselves from this feast are evil; but not all those who entered in are good. You therefore who are the good guests at this feast do I address, who have in your minds the words, “He that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh judgment to himself (1 Cor 11:29). All you who are such do I address, that ye look not for the good without, that ye bear with the evil within.

2. I do not doubt that ye wish to hear, Beloved, who they are of whom I have spoken in my address, that they should not look for the good without, and should bear with the evil within. If all within are evil, whom do I address? If all within are good, whom did I advise them to bear with being evil? Let me first then with the Lord’s assistance get out of this difficulty as best I can. If you consider good perfectly and strictly speaking, none is good but God Alone. Ye have the Lord saying most plainly, “Why callest thou Me good? there is none Good but One, that is, God” (Mt 19:17). How then can that marriage feast have good and bad guests, if “none is good but God Alone”? In the first place ye ought to know, that after a certain sort we are all evil. Yes, doubtless after a certain sort are we all evil; but after no sort are we all good. For can we compare ourselves with the Apostles, to whom the Lord Himself said, “If ye then being evil know how to give good gifts unto your children?” (Mt 7:11) If we consider the Scriptures, there was but one evil one among the twelve Apostles, with reference to whom the Lord said in a certain place, “And ye are clean, but not all” (Jn 13:10). But yet in addressing them all together, He said, “If ye being evil.” Peter heard this, John heard this, Andrew heard this, all the rest of the eleven Apostles heard it. What did they hear? “If ye being evil know how to give good gifts unto your children; how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask Him?” When they heard that they were evil, they were in despair; but when they heard that God in heaven was their Father, they revived. “Ye being evil;” what then is due to the evil, but punishment? “How much more shall your Father which is in heaven?” What is due to children but reward. In the name of “evil” is the dread of punishment; in the name of “children” is the hope of heirs.

3. According to a certain respect then they were evil, who after another respect were good. For to them to whom it is said, “Ye being evil know how to give good gifts unto your children;” is added immediately, “How much more shall your Father which is in heaven?” He is then the Father of the evil, but not of those who are to be left so; because He is the Physician of them who are to be cured. According to a certain sort then they were evil. And yet those guests of the Householder at the King’s marriage, were not I suppose of that number of whom it was said, “they invited good and bad” (Mt 22:10), that they should be reckoned among the number of the bad, who we have heard were shut out in his person who was found not to have a wedding garment. According to a certain respect, I repeat they were bad, who yet were good; and according to a certain respect they were good, who yet were bad. Hear John according to what respect they were bad: “If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” (1 Jn 1:8).  Behold after what respect they were bad: because they had sin. According to what respect were they good? “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn 1:9). If then we should say, on the principle of this interpretation which ye have now heard me bring, as I think, out of the sacred Scriptures, viz. that the same men are both after a certain manner good, and after a certain manner bad; if we should wish to receive according to this sense the words, “they invited good and bad,” the same persons, that is, at once good and bad; if we should wish so to receive them, we are not permitted so to do, by reason of that one who was found “not having a wedding garment,” and who was not merely “cast forth,” so as to be deprived of that feast, but so as to be condemned in the punishment of everlasting darkness.

4. But one will say, What of one man? what strange, what great matter is it, if one among the crowd “not having a wedding garment” crept in unperceived to the servants of the Householder? Could it be said because of that one, “they invited good and bad”? Attend therefore, my Brethren, and understand. That one man represented one class; for they were many. Here some diligent hearer may answer me, and say, “I have no wish for you to tell me your guesses; I wish to have it proved to me that that one represented many.” By the Lord’s present help, I will prove it clearly; nor will I search far, that I may be able to prove it. God will assist me in His own words in in this place, and will furnish you by my ministry with a plain proof of it. “The Master of the house came in to see the guests” (Mt 22:11).  See, my Brethren, the servants’ business was only to invite and bring in the good and bad; see that it is not said, that the servants took notice of the guests, and found among them a man which had not on a wedding garment, and spoke to him. This is not written. The Master of the house saw him, the Master of the house discovered, the Master of the house inspected, the Master of the house separated him out. It was not right to pass over this. But I have undertaken to establish another point, how that that one signifies many. “The Master of the house” then “came in to see the guests, and He found there a man which had not on a wedding garment. And He saith unto him, Friend, how camest thou in hither, not having a wedding garment? And he was speechless” (Mt 22:12). For He who questioned him was One, to whom he could give no feigned reply. The garment that was looked for is in the heart, not on the body; for had it been put on externally, it could not have been concealed even from the servants. Where that wedding garment must be put on, hear in the words, “Let thy priests be clothed with righteousness” (Ps 132:9). Of that garment the Apostle speaks, “If so be that we shall be found clothed, and not naked” (2 Cor 5:3).  Therefore was he discovered by the Lord, who escaped the notice of the servants. Being questioned, he is speechless: he is bound, cast out, and condemned one by many. I have said, Lord, that Thou teachest us that in this Thou dost give warning to all. Recollect then with me, my Brethren, the words which ye have heard, and ye will at once discover, at once determine, that that one was many. True it was one man whom the Lord questioned, to one He said, “Friend, how camest thou in hither?” It was one who was speechless, and of that same one was it said, “Bind him hand and foot, and cast him into outer darkness; there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Mt 22:13). Why? “For many are called, but few chosen” (Mt 22:14). How can any one gainsay this manifestation of the truth? “Cast him,” He saith, “into outer darkness.” “Him,” that one man assuredly, of whom the Lord saith, “for many are called, but few chosen.” So then it is the few who are not cast out. He was it is true but one man “who had not the wedding garment. Cast him out.” But why is he cast out? “For many are called, but few chosen.” Leave alone the few, cast out the many. It is true, that man was but one. Yet undoubtedly that one not only was many, but those many in numbers far surpassed the number of the good. For the good are many also; but in comparison of the bad, they are few. In the crop there is much wheat; compare it with the chaff, and the grains of corn are few. The same persons considered in themselves are many, in comparison with the bad are few. How do we prove that in themselves they are many? “Many shall come from the East and from the West.” Whither shall they come? To that feast, into which both good and bad enter. But speaking of another feast, He subjoined, “and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven” (Mt 8:11) That is the feast to which the bad shall not approach. Be that feast which now is, received worthily, that we may attain to the other. The same then are many, who are also few; in themselves many; in comparison with the bad few. Therefore what saith the Lord? He found one, and said, “Let the many be cast out, the few remain.” For to say, “many are called, but few chosen,” is nothing else than to show plainly who in this present feast are accounted to be such, as to be brought to that other feast, where no bad men shall come.

5. What is it then? I would not that ye all who approach the Lord’s Table which is in this life, should be with the many who are to be shut out, but with the few who are to be reserved. And how shall ye be able to attain to this? Take “the wedding garment.” Ye will say, “Explain this ‘wedding garment’ to us.” Without a doubt, that is the garment which none but the good have, who are to be left at the feast, reserved unto that other feast to which no bad man approaches, who are to be brought safely thither by the grace of the Lord; these have “the wedding garment.” Let us then, my Brethren, seek for those among the faithful who have something which bad men have not, and this will be “the wedding garment.” If we speak of sacraments, ye see how that these are common to the bad and good. Is it Baptism? Without Baptism it is true no one attaineth to God; but not every one that hath Baptism attaineth to Him. I cannot therefore understand Baptism, the Sacrament itself that is, to be “the wedding garment;” for this garment I see in the good, I see in the bad. Peradventure it is the Altar, or That which is received at the Altar. But no; we see that many eat, and “eat and drink judgment to themselves.” What is it then? Is it fasting? The wicked fast also. Is it running together to the Church? The wicked run thither also. Lastly, is it miracles? Not only do the good and bad perform them, but sometimes the good perform them not. See, among the ancient people Pharaoh’s magicians wrought miracles, the Israelites did not; among the Israelites, Moses only and Aaron wrought them; the rest did not, but saw, and feared, and believed (Ex 7). Were the magicians of Pharaoh who did miracles, better men than the people of Israel who could not do them, and yet that people were the people of God. In the Church itself, hear the Apostle, “Are all prophets? Have all the gifts of healing? Do all speak with tongues?” (1 Cor 12:29)

6. What is that “wedding garment” then? This is the wedding garment: “Now the end of the commandment,” says the Apostle, “is charity out of a pure heart, and of a good conscience, and of faith unfeigned” (1 Tim 1:5). This is “the wedding garment.” Not charity of any kind whatever; for very often they who are partakers together of an evil conscience seem to love one another. They who commit robberies together, who love the hurtful arts of sorceries, and the stage together, who join together in the shout of the chariot race, or the wild beast fight; these very often love one another; but in these there is no “charity out of a pure heart, and of a good conscience, and of faith unfeigned. The wedding garment” is such charity as this. “Though I speak with the tongues of men and of Angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, and a tinkling cymbal” (1 Cor 13:1). Tongues have come in alone, and it is said to them, “How came ye in hither not having a wedding garment?” “Though,” said he, “I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries, and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.” See, these are the miracles of men who very often have not “the wedding garment.” “Though,” he says, “I have all these, and have not Christ, I am nothing.” Is then “the gift of prophecy” nothing? is then “the knowledge of mysteries” nothing? It is not that these are nothing; but “I,” if I have them, “and have not charity, am nothing.” How many good things profit nothing without this one good thing! If then I have not charity, though I bestow alms freely upon the poor, though I have come to the confession of Christ’s Name even unto blood and fire, these things may be done even through the love of glory, and so are vain. Because then they may be done even from the love of glory, and so be vain, and not through the rich charity of a godly affection, he names them all also in express terms, and do thou give ear to them; “though I distribute all my goods for the use of the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing” (1 Cor 13:3). This then is “the wedding garment.” Question yourselves; if ye have it, ye may be without fear in the Feast of the Lord. In one and the same man there exist two things, charity and desire. Let charity be born in thee, if it be yet unborn, and if it be born, be it nourished, fostered, increased. But as to that desire, though in this life it cannot be utterly extinguished; “for if we say that we have no sin we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us” (1 Jn 1:8); but in so far as desire is in us, so far we are not without sin: let charity increase, desire decrease; that the one, that is, charity, may one day be perfected, and desire be consumed. Put on “the wedding garment:” you I address, who as yet have it not. Ye are already within, already do ye approach to the Feast, and I still have ye not yet the garment to do honour to the Bridegroom; “Ye are yet seeking your own things, not the things which are Jesus Christ’s” (Philip 2:21). For “the wedding garment” is taken in honour of the union, the union, that is, of the Bridegroom to the Bride. Ye know the Bridegroom; it is Christ. Ye know the Bride; it is the Church. Pay honour9 to the Bride, pay honour to the Bridegroom. If ye pay due honour to them both, ye will be their children. Therefore in this make progress. Love the Lord, and so learn to love yourselves; that when by loving the Lord ye shall have loved yourselves, ye may securely love your neighbour as yourselves. For when I find a man that does not love himself, how shall I commit his neighbour whom he should love as himself to him? And who is there, you will say, who does not love himself? Who is there? See, “He that loveth iniquity hateth his own soul” (Ps 11:5). Does he love himself, who loves his body, and hates his soul to his own hurt, to the hurt of both his body and soul? And who loves his own soul? He that loveth God with all his heart and with all his mind. To such an one I would at once entrust his neighbour. “Love your neighbour as yourselves.”

7. One may say, “Who is my neighbour?” Every man is your neighbour. Had we not all the same two parents? Animals of every species are neighbours one to the other, the dove to the dove, the leopard to the leopard, the asp to the asp, the sheep to the sheep, and is not man neighbour to man? Call to mind the ordering of the creation. God spake, the waters brought forth swimming creatures, great whales, fish, birds, and such like things. Did all the birds come of one bird? Did all vultures come of one vulture? Did all doves come of one dove? Did all snakes come of one snake? or all gilt-heads of one gilt-head?2 or all sheep of one sheep? No, the earth assuredly brought forth all these kinds together. But when it came to man, the earth did not bring forth man. One father was made for us; not even two, father and mother: one father, I say, was made for us, not even two, father and mother; but out of the one father came the one mother; the one father came from none, but was made by God, and the one mother came out of him. Mark then the nature of our race: we flowed out of one fountain; and because that one was turned to bitterness, we all became from a good, a wild olive tree. And so grace came also. One begat us unto sin and death, yet as one race, yet as neighbours one to another, yet as not merely like, but related to each other. There came One against one; against the one who scattered, One who gathereth. Thus against the one who slayeth, is the One who maketh alive. “For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.”3 Now as whosoever is born of the first, dieth; so whosoever believeth in Christ is made alive. Provided, that is, that he have “the wedding garment,” and be invited as one who is to remain, and not to be cast out.

8. So then, my Brethren, have charity. I have explained it to be this garment, this “wedding garment.” Faith is praised, it is plain, it is praised: but what kind of faith this is, the Apostle distinguishes. For certain who boasted of faith, and had not a good conversation, the Apostle James rebukes and says, “Thou believest there is one God, thou doest well; the devils also believe and tremble.”4 Call to mind with me whereupon Peter was praised, whereupon called blessed. Was it because he said, “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God”?5 He who pronounced Him blessed, regarded not the sound of the words, but the affection of the heart. For would ye know that Peter’s blessedness lay not in these words? The devils also said the same. “We know Thee who Thou art, the Son of God.”6 Peter confessed Him to be “the Son of God;” the devils confessed Him to be “the Son of God.” “Distinguish, my lord, distinguish between the two.” I do make a plain distinction. Peter spake in love, the devils from fear. And again Peter says, “I am with Thee, even unto death.”7 The devils say, “What have we to do with Thee?” So then thou who art come to the feast, glory not of faith only. Distinguish well the nature of this faith; and then in thee is recognised “the wedding garment.” Let the Apostle make the distinction, let him teach us; “neither circumcision availeth anything, nor uncircumcision, but faith.”8 Tell us, what faith? do not even the devils believe and tremble? I will tell thee, he says, and listen, I will now draw the distinction, “But faith which worketh by love.” What faith, then, and of what kind? “That which worketh by love.” “Though I have all knowledge,” he says, “and all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am nothing.” Have faith with love; for love without faith ye cannot have. This I warn, this I exhort, this in the name of the Lord I teach you, Beloved, that ye have faith with love; for ye may possibly have faith without love. I do not exhort you to have faith, but love. For ye cannot have love without faith; the love I mean of God and your neighbour; whence can it come without faith? How doth he love God, who doth not believe on God? How doth the fool love God, “who saith in his heart, there is no God”?9 Possible it is that ye may believe that Christ hath come and not love Christ. But it is not possible that ye should love Christ, and yet say that Christ hath not come.

9. So then, have faith with love. This is the “wedding garment.” Ye who love Christ, love one another, love your friends, love your enemies. Let not this be hard to you. What then do ye lose thereby, when ye gain so much? What? dost thou ask of God as some great favour, that thine enemy may die? This is not “the wedding garment.” Turn thy thoughts to the Bridegroom Himself hanging upon the Cross for thee, and praying to His Father for His enemies; “Father,” saith He, “forgive them, for they know not what they do.”10 Thou hast seen the Bridegroom speaking thus; see too the friend of the Bridegroom, a guest “with the wedding garment.” Look at the blessed Stephen, how he rebukes the Jews as though in rage and resentment, “Ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye have resisted the Holy Ghost. Which of the Prophets have not your fathers killed?”1 Thou hast heard how severe he is with his tongue. And at2 once thou art prepared to speak against any one; and I would it were against him who offendeth God, and not who offendeth thee. One offendeth God, and thou dost not rebuke him; he offendeth thee, and thou criest out; where is that “wedding garment”? Ye have heard therefore how Stephen was severe; now hear how he loved. He offended those whom he was rebuking, and was stoned by them. And as he was being overwhelmed and bruised to death by the hands of his furious persecutors on every side, and the blows of the stones, he first said, “Lord Jesus Christ, receive my spirit.”3 Then after he had prayed for himself standing, he bent the knee for them who were stoning him, and said, “Lord, lay not this sin to their charge; let me die in my body, but let not these die in their souls. And when he had said this, he fell asleep.”4 After these words he added no more; he spake them and departed; his last prayer was for his enemies. Learn ye hereby to have “the wedding garment.” So do thou too bend the knee, and beat thy forehead against the ground, and as thou art about to approach the Table of the Lord, the Feast of the Holy Scriptures, do not say, “O that mine enemy might die! Lord, if I have deserved ought of Thee, slay mine enemy.” Because if so be that thou sayest so, dost thou not fear lest He should answer thee, “If I should choose to slay thine enemy, I should first slay thee. What! dost thou glory because thou hast now come invited hither? Think only what thou wast but a little while ago. Hast thou not blasphemed Me? hast thou not derided Me? didst thou not wish to wipe out My Name from off the earth? Yet now thou dost applaud thyself because thou hast come invited hither! If I had slain thee when thou wast Mine enemy, how could I have made thee My friend? Why, by thy wicked prayers dost thou teach Me to do, what I did not in thine own case?” Yea rather God saith to thee, “Let me teach thee to imitate Me. When I was hanging on the Cross, I said, ‘Forgive them, for they know not what they do.’5 This lesson I taught My brave soldier. Be thou My recruit against the devil. In no other way wilt thou fight at all unconquerably, unless thou dost pray for thine enemies. Yet by all means ask this, yea ask this very thing, ask that thou mayest persecute thine enemy; but ask it with discernment; distinguish well what thou askest. See, a man is thine enemy; answer me, what is it in him which is at enmity with thee? Is it in this, that he is a man, that he is at enmity with thee? No. What then? That he is evil. In that he is a man, in that he is that I made him, he is not at enmity with thee.” He saith to thee, “I did not make man evil; he became evil by disobedience, who obeyed the devil6 rather than God. What he has made himself, is at enmity with thee; in that he is evil, he is thine enemy; not in that he is a man. For I hear the word “man,” and “evil;” the one is the name of nature, the other of sin; the sin I cure; and the nature I preserve.” And so thy God saith to thee, “See, I do avenge thee, I do slay thine enemy; I take away that which makes him evil, I preserve that which constitutes him a man: now if I shall have made him a good man, have I not slain thine enemy, and made him thy friend?” So ask on what thou art asking, not that the men may perish, but that these their enmities may perish. For if thou pray for this, that the man may die; it is the prayer of one wicked man against another; and when thou dost say, “Slay the wicked one,” God answereth thee, “Which of you?”

10. Extend your love then, and limit it not to your wives and children. Such love is found even in beasts and sparrows. Ye know the sparrows and the swallows how they love their mates, how together they hatch their eggs, and nourish their young together, by a sort of free7 and natural kindliness, and with no thought of a return. For the sparrow does not say, “I will nourish my young, that when I am grown old, they may feed me.” He has no such thought; he loves and feeds them, for the love of them; displays the affection of a parent, and looks for no return. And so, I know, I am sure, do ye love your children. “For the children ought not to lay up for the parents, but the parents for the children.”8 Yea upon this plea it is that many of you excuse your covetousness, that ye are getting for your children, and are laying by for them.9 But I say, extend your love, let this love grow; for to love wives and children, is not yet that “wedding garment.” Have faith to Godward. First love God. Extend yourselves out to God; and whomsoever ye shall be able, draw on to God. There is thine enemy: let him be drawn to God. There is a son, a wife, a servant; let them be all drawn to God. There is a stranger; let him be drawn to God. There is an enemy; let him be drawn to God. Draw, draw on thine enemy; by drawing him on he shall cease to be thine enemy. So let charity be advanced, so be it nourished, that being nourished it may be perfected; so be “the wedding garment” put on; so be the image of God, after which we were created, by this our advancing, engraven anew in us. For by sin was it bruised, and worn away. How is it bruised? how worn away? When it is rubbed against the earth? And what is, “When it is rubbed against the earth”? When it is worn by earthly lusts. For “though man1 walketh in this image, yet is he disquieted in vain.”2 Truth is looked for in God’s image, not vanity. By the love of the truth then be that image, after which we were created, engraven anew, and His Own tribute rendered to our Cæsar. For so ye have heard from the Lord’s answer, when the Jews tempted Him, as He said, “Why tempt ye Me, ye hypocrites; show Me the tribute money,”3 that is, the impress and superscription of the image. Show me what ye pay, what ye get ready, what is exacted of you. And “they showed Him a denarius;” and “He asked whose image and superscription it had.” They answered, “Cæsar’s.” So Cæsar looks for his own image. It is not Cæsar’s will that what he ordered to be made should be lost to him, and it is not surely God’s will that what He hath made should be lost to Him. Cæsar, my Brethren, did not make the money; the masters of the mint4 make it; the workmen have their orders, he issues his commands to his ministers. His image was stamped upon the money; on the money was Cæsar’s image. And yet he requires what others have stamped; he puts it in his treasures; he will not have it refused him. Christ’s coin is man. In him is Christ’s image, in him Christ’s Name, Christ’s gifts, Christ’s rules of duty.5

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, fathers of the church, Notes on the Gospel of Matthew, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture, SERMONS | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Matthew 22:1-11

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2015

TRIUMPHAL ENTRY OF JESUS INTO JERUSALEM
[Mat 22:1–11. Mark 2:1–10. Luke 19:29–38]

ON the following morning (1) Jesus left Bethania and went to Jerusalem. When He had come to Bethphage (2), on the Mount of Olives, He sent two of His disciples, saying: “Go ye into the village that is over against you, and immediately you shall find an ass and a colt (3) with her. Loose them and bring them to Me. And if any man shall say anything to you, say ye that the Lord hath need of them.”

1. Following morning. Jesus had passed Friday and Saturday (Sabbath) at Bethania, where He was anointed by Mary. On the next day, Sunday, He made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem.
2. Bethphage. A little village situated to the west of Bethania, on the summit of the Mount of Olives, and not far from Jerusalem.
3. A colt. “On which no man hath sitten”, added our Lord. Therefore the first service performed by this beast was dedicated to Him.

So the disciples went and found the colt standing as Jesus had said. They therefore brought the ass and the colt (4) to Jesus, and, laying their garments upon it, they made Jesus sit thereon. Now many wished to see Jesus, because He had raised Lazarus from the dead. When, therefore, Jesus was near the city, His disciples and a great multitude (5) spread their garments in the way: while some cut down branches (6) from the trees and strewed them along the road. And a vast multitude went before and followed after, crying: “Hosanna (7) to the Son of David! (8) Blessed is He that cometh in the name (9) of the Lord, Hosanna in the highest!” (10)

4. The ass and the colt. The disciples brought the ass as well as the colt to Jesus, because this last, having never been separated from its mother, might have proved unmanageable without her.
5. A great multitude. The news of the raising of Lazarus had spread through Jerusalem, and had kindled in the crowd of pilgrims, who had flocked thither for the Paschal Feast, the belief that Jesus was indeed the Messias. They therefore prepared this triumphal entry for Him.
6. Branches. It was the custom to carry and wave palm-branches as a sign of joy and victory.
7. Hosanna. This exclamation is the equivalent of our “Hurrah!” and means “Save, we pray”.
8. To the Son of David. To the Messias.
9. In the name. Sent by the Lord God.
1o. The highest! They appealed to the angels to share the joy with which they greeted their Messias.

There were also in the crowd some Pharisees, who, being filled with envy and hatred, never lost sight of Jesus. Seeing the honours that were now paid to Him, they indignantly (11) asked: “Hearest Thou (12) what these say?” Jesus replied: “If these should hold their peace, the stones (13) will cry out.” The nearer He came to the city, the greater the crowd became, and the more the enthusiasm of the people increased.

11. Indignantly. At the sight of the people’s exultation. As they did not dare to impose silence on the populace, they turned on Jesus and rebuked Him.
12. Hearest Thou? How they greet you as the Messias! Do you accept this homage without protest?
13. The stones. The truth that I am the Messias cannot be suppressed; it must be proclaimed; and if men did not bear witness, God would miraculously testify to this truth by means of the very stones. When, at our Lord’s death, His disciples, crushed by fear and grief, held their peace, the quaking earth and the rent rocks bore witness to their Lord and Creator (St. Ambrose).

Then was fulfilled the prophecy of Zacharias, that Jerusalem should be visited by her king as a Saviour; that He should be poor and riding on an ass [Zach. 9:9].

But seeing9 Jerusalem, Jesus wept over it, saying: “If thou also (14) hadst known, and that in this thy day (15), the things (16) that are for thy peace, but now they are hidden (17) from thy eyes! For the days shall come upon thee, and thy enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and straiten thee (18) on every side, and beat thee flat to the ground, and thy children who are in thee, and they shall not leave in thee a stone upon a stone, because thou hast not known the time of thy visitation.” (19)

14. Thou also. As well as this shouting crowd.
15. Thy day. On this day which is so important for you and so decisive of your fate.
16. The things. Namely the belief in the Messias, which would bring you salvation.
17. Hidden. By your own fault, your wilful blindness.
18. Straiten thee. Our Lord saw in spirit the terrible fate which would ere long overtake the unbelieving city; how it would be surrounded by enemies, and utterly destroyed.
19. Thy visitation. You refuse to see that God is visiting you at this moment, when your Saviour is entering within your walls.

As Jesus rode through the streets directly to the Temple, the whole city was moved (20). Then the sick, the blind and the lame were brought to Him from every side, and He cured them all. At this sight the children began to cry out again: “Hosanna to the Son of David!” But the Pharisees, becoming furious, told Him to rebuke them. Jesus answered them: “Have you never read the words: Out of the mouths of infants and sucklings Thou hast perfected praise?” (21)

20. Moved. Scripture adds: “When He was come into Jerusalem, the whole city was moved, saying: ‘Who is this?’ And the people said: ‘This is Jesus, the Prophet from Nazareth of Galilee.’ ” The multitude which had formed the joyous and triumphant procession was principally composed of pilgrims from Galilee and Peræa. The exultation of these strangers roused even the inhabitants of Jerusalem out of their indifference, and they asked: “Who is this Man? Why is He so honoured and praised?” They quite ignored or forgot the miracles He had worked in their midst: they would not know Him, and thereby betrayed that unbelief over which Jesus had but just before shed such bitter tears.
21. Perfected praise. Jesus applied the passage (Psalm 8:3) to Himself, saying thus to His adversaries: “These children, by shouting in praise of Me, do but fulfil that which the Prophet foretold they would do.”

WHAT WE LEARN FROM THIS PASSAGE

Jesus, the Promised Redeemer. Hitherto our Lord had avoided all tokens of veneration on the part of the people (see chapter XXXIII); but now that He was approaching Jerusalem to suffer and die for the Redemption of the world, it was His will to enter its walls solemnly, as Messias and King. He desired that thousands of voices should proclaim in the presence of the unbelieving people of Jerusalem, that He was indeed their promised Redeemer. But He did not make this entry in battle-array, and mounted on a war-horse: He rode in, meek and gentle, sitting on an ass, the type of peace, to signify that He was not the Founder and King of an earthly city, raised by force of arms, such as most of the Jews fondly expected, but the Prince of Peace, whose kingdom was one of truth and grace.

Jesus, the Son of God. Jesus showed Himself to be God, and this in a fourfold way. 1. He knew that His disciples would find the ass and her colt tied up, as described, in the village of Bethphage, and He knew the disposition of their owner. 2. He foretold the siege and destruction of Jerusalem (for the account of which see chapter LVIII). He knew the things which were invisible, as also those things which had not yet taken place, and the secret thoughts in the hearts of men. He was, therefore, omniscient. 3. He applied to Himself the passage in Psalm 8: “Out of the mouths of infants” &c. This Psalm relates to the adoration paid by all creation, and even little children, to the Lord God. By applying it to Himself, Jesus claimed to be the Lord and God of creation. 4. He showed His divine Omnipotence by healing the lame, blind and sick who were brought to Him.

The tears of Jesus. All in the midst of the joy of the people and the homage paid to Him, Jesus burst into tears at the sight of the holy city! He who had dried the tears of so many, and had said to the mourners: “Weep not”, now wept Himself. “This scene is so moving that it defies all attempts at description. The soul alone can try to discern what passed through the mind of Jesus, and weep with Him as a child weeps with its mother, the reason of whose tears it cannot understand. And in truth the tears of Jesus are a mystery to us, so incomprehensible is the love which brought Him from heaven to this vale of tears. He prayed for those who persecuted Him, but it is infinitely more that He should have wept over their misfortunes” (Schegg). Let us try to penetrate the mystery of these tears! He gazed at the Temple, both the erection and the services of which pointed to Him, the Redeemer, whom, in spite of all, this highly favoured city refused to acknowledge! That day was the last day of grace for both city and people. His solemn entry was for them the last warning and the time of visitation: and Jesus knew but too well that this last grace would be passed by, unused, as all the rest had been, and that His chosen people would blindly reject salvation, while hatred and envy of their Saviour filled the hearts of their leaders. Jesus wept therefore 1. over the blindness and obstinacy of the chosen people; for He, the Saviour, was bringing no salvation to the impenitent city which, by its final rejection of Him, would fill the measure of God’s wrath, and draw down on itself speedy and terrible judgment. This knowledge drew bitter tears from Him. He wept 2. over the coming downfall of Jerusalem, and the calamities which its people would bring on themselves; and still more over the eternal woe which would overtake this unfaithful and impenitent city. He therefore wept especially 3. over the eternal loss of so many souls which He had come to save. How very great is the love of the Divine Heart of Jesus, that it should make Him shed bitter tears over those who repaid His love with such ingratitude, and who were ruined by their own fault!

Resistance to grace. We see by the case of the unbelieving city of Jerusalem how possible it is to resist grace.

Sins against the Holy Ghost. The Pharisees and those under their influence envied Jesus on account of the wonderful works which He did, and resisted the known truth that Jesus was the Messias; and thus deliberately persevered in impenitence.

Palm-Sunday, with the blessing of palms and its solemn procession, is thus celebrated 1. in memory of our Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem; 2. in thankful remembrance of the victory of faith over unbelief; and 3. as a salutary warning to us that we must overcome sin if we desire to enter heaven triumphantly.

APPLICATION

To neglect the hour of grace, and to resist grace are the most terrible of misfortunes. Will you suffer such a misfortune to overtake you? Will you be obstinate, impenitent, and lose your soul? A man’s heart becomes bad little by little, not all at once; and he who in his youth refuses to listen to warnings, and resists God’s grace, is likely to grow up leading an evil life, and is on the high road to obstinacy in sin and final impenitence. Apply this to yourself!

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Notes on the Gospel of Matthew, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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