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Archive for the ‘Scripture’ Category

This Week’s Posts: Pentecost to Trinity Sunday (Eighth Week in Ordinary Time, Year I)

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 23, 2015

PENTECOST SUNDAY

Commentaries for the Vigil Mass of Pentecost.

Commentaries for Pentecost Sunday.

MONDAY OF THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 17:20-24.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 32.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 32.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 10:17-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 10:17-27.

Pope Benedict’s Homily on Mark 10:17-27.

Another Homily on Mark 10:17-27 by Pope Benedict.

TUESDAY OF THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 35:1-12.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 50.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 50.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 10:28-31.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 10:28-31.

St Catherine of Siena on Mark 10:28-31.

WEDNESDAY OF THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Commentary on Sirach 36:1, 4-5a, 10-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 79.

My Background Notes on Psalm 79:8, 9, 11, 13. Contains background on the psalm with notes on the responsorial verses.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 10:32-45.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 10:32-45.

The Catechism on Today’s Gospel Mark 10:32-45.

THURSDAY O F THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Commentary on Sirach 42:15-25.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 33.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 33.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 33.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 10:46-52.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 10:46-52.

FRIDAY OF THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 44:1, 9-13.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 149.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 11:11-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 11:11-26.

SATURDAY OF THE EIGHTH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Sirach 51:12cd-20.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 19.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 19.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 19.

Navarre Commentary on Mark 11:27-33.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 11:27-33.

TRINITY SUNDAY
SOLEMNITY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

Pending: Commentaries for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.

 

 

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Commentaries for the Seventh Week of Easter

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 16, 2015

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

COMMENTARIES FOR THE SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER.

MONDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 19:1-8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 19:1-8.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 68.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 68.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 16:29-33.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 16:29-33.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 16:29-33.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 16:29-33. A modern translation. The homily is actually on verses 16-33.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 16:29-33.

TUESDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 20:17-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 20:17-27.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 68.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 68.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 17:1-11a.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 17:1-11a.

St John Chrysostom’s Exegetical Homily on John 17:1-11a.

Word-Sunday Notes on John 17:1-11a.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 17:1-11a.

WEDNESDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 20:28-38.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 20:28-38.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 68.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 68.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 17:11b-19.

THURSDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 22:30, 23:6-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 22:30, 23:6-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 16.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 16.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 16.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 16.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 16.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 17:20-26.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary John 17:20-26. A newer translation of his homily on verses 14-26. Scroll down slightly.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 17:20-26.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 17:20-26.

FRIDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 25:13b-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 25:13b-21.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 103.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 103.

My Notes on John 21:15-19.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 21:15-19.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 21:15-19.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 21:15-19.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 21:15-19.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 21:15-19. Newer translation of his homily on verses 15-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 21:15-19.

SATURDAY OF THE SEVENTH WEEK OF EASTER

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 28:16-20, 30-31.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 28:16-20, 30-31.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 11.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 11.

Father’s Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 21:20-25.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 21:20-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 21:20-25.

PENTECOST SUNDAY

Commentaries for the Vigil Mass of Pentecost.

Commentaries for Pentecost Sunday.

Next Week’s Posts.

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Commentaries for Pentecost Sunday

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 16, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE: Please Note: the Lectionary for today allows for an alternate second reading and an alternate Gospel reading. I’ve supplied commentary for all.

Today’s Mass Readings (NABRE). Translation used in the USA.

Today’s Mass Readings (NJB). Scroll down slightly. The NJB is used in most other English speaking countries.

Today’s Divine Office.

Anglican Use Daily Office. ”Briefly, it is a provision for an “Anglican style” liturgy similar to the Book of Common Prayer as an ecclesiastically approved variant on the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.” More info.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 2:1-11.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 2:1-11.

Navvare Bible Commentary on Acts 2:1-11.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Acts 2:1-11.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 2:1-11.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 2:1-11.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL PSALM: Ps 104:1, 24, 29-30, 31, 34

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 104.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 104: 1, 24, 29-30, 31, 34.

Lection Divina Notes on Psalm 104.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 Cor 12:3b-7, 12-13.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13.

Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 12:3-7, 12-13.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on 1 Cor 12:3b-7, 12-13.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Commentary on 1 Cor 12:3b-7, 12-13. Read all three lectures. English translation in the right column.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13.

ALTERNATE SECOND READING: Galatians 5:16-25.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Galatians 5:16-25.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 20:19-23.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 20:19-23.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 20:19-23.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 20:19-23.

Father MacIntyre’s Commentary on John 20:19-23.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 20:19-23.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Commentary on John 20:19-23. Scroll down and read lecture 4.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 20:19-23.

ALTERNATE GOSPEL READING: John 15:26-27; 16:12-15.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:26-27, 26:12-15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:26-27, 16:12-15.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:26-27, 16:12-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:26-27, 16:12-15.

HOMILIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 2:1-11.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Homily for Pentecost. A gem. Few of his homilies have survived.

A Homily on Acts 2:1-11. Pdf document. By Father Johann Evangelist Zollner, a famed preacher of his day.

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Commentaries for the Vigil Mass for Pentecost Sunday

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 16, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Vigil Mass Readings from the NABRE. Used in the USA.

Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Please be aware that for the Vigil Mass there are 4 possible OT reading to choose from.

First Old Testament Reading: Genesis 11:1-9.

Second Old Testament Reading: Exodus 19:3-8a, 16-20b.

Third Old Testament Reading: Ezekiel 37:1-14.

Fourth Old Testament Reading: Joel 3:1-5.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 104:1-2, 24, 25, 27-28, 29, 30.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 104.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 104. On entire psalm.

Lectio Divina Notes on Psalm 104.On entire psalm.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: Romans 8:22-27.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Romans 8:22-27. Commentary actually begins with verse 18 in this post.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Romans 8:22-27.

Pending: Bishop MacEvilly’s Commentary on Romans 8:22-27.

Homilist’s Catechism on Romans 8:22-27.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Romans 8:22-27.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL:

Father’s Nolan and Brown’s Commentary on John 7:37-39.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 7:37-39.

St Augustine’s Tractate on John 7:37-39. On 32-39.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 7:37-39.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 7:37-39.

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Commentaries for the Feast of the Ascension

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 8, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on Acts 1:1-11.

St John Chrysostom’s Exegetical Homily on Acts 1:1-5.

St John Chrysostom’s Exegetical Homily on Acts 1:6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 1:1-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 47.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 47).

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 47.

Father Wilberforce’s Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23. This commentary actually begins with verse 15. It is a pdf document.

Father Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23. This commentary actully begins with verse 15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Ephesians 1:17-23.

Alternate Reading: Navarre Bible Commentary on Ephesians 4:1-13 in Two Parts:

Alternate Reading: Father Callan on Ephesians 4:1-13.

Alternate Reading: Bernardin de Piconio on Ephesians 4:1-13.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 28:16-20.

Juan de Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 28:16-20.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 28:16-20.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Matthew 28:16-20.

Sermons:

Homily by Pope St Gregory the Great.  On the text of Mark 16:14-20.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Acts 1:1-15.

Sermon Plan: Some Thoughts on the Ascension.

Sermon Plan: Heaven is Our Goal.

Sermon Plan: The Ascension.

Christ’s Ascension a Lesson and a Warning to Sinners.

Commentary on the First Reading.

Why Jesus Christ Went Up To Heaven and What Is The Meaning Of “He Sitteth At The Right Hand Of The Father.

The Feast of the Ascension Teaches and Comforts Us.

Ascension Day.

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Commentaries for the Feast of St Matthias, Apostle

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 8, 2015

Today’s Mass Readings.

Today’s Divine Office.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 1:15-17, 20-26.

St John Chrysostom’s 3rd Homily on Acts. Begins at verse 12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 1:15-17, 20-26.

Father Boylan’s Introduction and Notes to Psalm 113.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 113.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:9-17.

St Augustine’s Homilies on John 15:9-17. Tractates 82-87 deal with the various verses in this reading.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 15:9-17. Scroll UP slightly and begin readings lectures 2 & 3.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:9-17.

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Commentaries for the Sixth Sunday of Easter, Year B

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 6, 2015

READINGS AND OFFICE:

Today’s Mass Readings (NABRE).

Today’s Mass Readings (NJB). The New Jerusalem Bible is the translation used for the readings in most English speaking countries.

Today’s Divine Office.

COMMENTARIES ON THE FIRST READING: Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48

Father Callan’s Commentary on Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48.

Pending: Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48.

Link fixed Navarre Bible Commentary on Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48.

Homilist’s Catechism on Acts 10:25-26, 34-35, 44-48.

COMMENTARIES ON THE RESPONSORIAL: Psalm 98:1, 2-3, 3-4.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

COMMENTARIES ON THE SECOND READING: 1 John 4:7-10.

St Augustine’s Homiletic Commentary on 1 John 4:7-10.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 4:7-10.

Bishop MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 John 4:7-10.

Link fixed Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 4:7-10.

Homilist’s Catechism on 1 John 4:7-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 15:9-17.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 15:9-17.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 15:9-17.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 15:9-17.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 15:9-17.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 15:9-17. Read lectures 2 & 3.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 15:9-17.

Link fixed. Navarre Bible Commentary on John 15:9-17.

Homilist’s Catechism on John 15:9-17.

NOTES, COMMENTARIES, BLOG POSTS ON THE READINGS IN GENERAL: Commentaries on particular readings listed further below.

Word Sunday. Brief notes on the readings.

Sacerdos. Theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

St Charles Borromeo Parish Bible Study Notes. Helpful notes prepared for their own bible study classes, apparently.

The Bible Workshop. Includes links to a couple of other resources, a comparison of the readings, and suggestions for a lesson (i.e., homily). Originally posted in 2009.

All You Need is Love. Blog post on the readings by Catholic biblical Scholar Dr. John Bergsma.

PODCASTS:

St Martha’s Bible Study Podcast. Usually looks at all of the readings in some detail.

Franciscan Sister’s Bible Study Podcast. Looks at all the readings.

Dr. Scott Hahn’s Podcast. Very brief. Does could job summarizing major the theme(s) of the readings. Text available.

Father McBride’s Podcast on Acts. Listen to episode 6.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on John 15:9-17. Actually, this podcast begins with 15:9, the start of today’s gospel reading, and continues through chapter 17.Click on the POD icon or “direct download”.

Father Barron’s Homily Podcast. Noted theologian and speaker.

Father Altier’s Homily Podcast. Text available further below under “Homilies and Homily Notes.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

Chosen to be Friends.  Homily.

Don’t Keep Your distance. Homily.

Catholic Doors Ministry.

Sacerdos. Gives theme of the readings, doctrinal message, pastoral application.

Sunday Soundbite. Audio or text. Brief.

Father Robert Altier’s Homily. Audio available above under “Podcasts”.

 

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 14:19-28

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 2, 2015

Acts 14:20. “Disciples.” His late converts, fancying him dead, and preparing to perform the rites of sepulture.

“He rose up.” Which was regarded by many as miraculous, as happened St. Sebastian under Diocletian. Some conjecture that his rapture into Paradise may have occurred then (2 Cor. 12:2, &c.).

Acts 14:21-22. “Returned again” courageously to the scene of their former persecution to exhort their converts not to deflect from the right path on account of sufferings, since, “through many tribulations,” &c. It is a fixed law of God’s adorable providence that the road to Heaven is the royal highway of the Cross, the only gate for entering it, the narrow gate of tribulations, which are “many.” It was in this way the Head entered; so must also the members. “All who wish to live piously in Christ Jesus must suffer persecution” (2 Tim 3:12). This life is a time for suffering here; the next, for enjoying the reward of suffering.

Acts 14:23. “Ordained to them Priests.” The Greek word for “ordained” literally means, in classic authors, to choose or elect, by holding out the hands (χειροτονησατες). It was originally applied to the voting of the people in public assemblies in favour of candidates for office. It is clear that here the election, appointment, or ordination, strictly speaking, took place irrespective of any voting on the part of the people. The whole operation, as the context shows, was performed solely by Paul and Barnabas. The threefold action was performed by the same persons, viz., ordaining, praying, with fasting, commending to the Lord.

Who else but Paul and Barnabas “commended their converts to the Lord”? Considering all the actions and circumstances, viz., praying with fasting, which accompanied this “ordaining,” it clearly can refer to nothing else save the conferring of the Sacrament of Holy Orders which was given by the imposition of the hands of Paul and Barnabas.
The word, χειροτονια, is well known to have been employed by the Greek Fathers to designate the Sacrament of Holy Orders, of which it became with them the official designation, probably grounded on this passage. While χειροθεσια, imposition of hands, is the term they used for the Sacrament of Confirmation.
It is also deserving of remark that the conjunction “and” is omitted in Greek before “had prayed.” The passage would then read thus: “And when they ordained to them Priests, praying with fasting,” &c. From this it is clear that all the operations performed together, viz., praying, fasting, imposing hands, manifestly refer to the same sacred rite, whereby the members of the Church were consecrated Priests.”
The word, “Priest,” comprises the clergy as well of the first as of the second order. The term, “Bishop,” by ecclesiastical and Apostolic usage, is applied only to the clergy of the first order, whom we know, as a defined point of faith, to be superior to the Priests in order and jurisdiction (Council of Trent, SS. xxiii. c. 4 canon 7).
“Commended to the Lord.” This was their valedictory farewell on leaving them.
Acts 14:24. “Pisidia” (Acts 13:14). This would be Pisidian Antioch in the lakes region of the province of Antalya inmodern day Turkey.
Acts 14:25. “Attalia,” in Pamphylia, on the sea coast. Also in Turkey.
Acts 14:26. “Antioch” of Syria (Acts 11:19; Acts 13:1). “Delivered to the grace of God.” Commended to the Divine protection on entering on the great missionary work, which they brought to a successful conclusion.
Acts 14:27. “Opened the door of faith,” &c. Supplied the means and opportunity of preaching the faith to the Gentiles, which, by God’s grace, they embraced.
Acts 14:28. How long cannot be exactly determined. The next we hear of them is at the Council of Jerusalem (c. 15).

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Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on John 14:21-28

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 2, 2015

Jn 14:21. The above favours are not confined to the Apostles alone. They extend to all the faithful. “He that hath My commandments,” bears them in mind, “and keepeth them.” It won’t do, to believe and retain them in mind. It is necessary to observe them in deed. “He it is that loveth Me.” The observance of My commandments is the true test of love. “And he that loveth Me will be loved by My Father.” My commandments are the commandments I received of My Father. He, then, who keeps them, loves My Father, and shall be loved by Him in turn, and shall receive from Him abundant proofs of His love in the great blessings He shall bestow. “And I shall love him,” not only as God, but as man, and shall bestow on him great gifts here and hereafter

“And will manifest Myself to him,” in this life, by a clearer revelation of Myself, by a practical knowledge and feeling of love, such as My Saints experience when they taste and see how good God is; and in the life to come, when he shall see Me face to face.

Jn 14:22. Judas Iscariot had left, the Evangelist, therefore, who had already stated that he had left, here guards against any mistake. The Judas here referred to was Thaddeus, the brother of James, the Less. He was the author of the Catholic Epistle.

“How is it, that Thou wilt manifest?” etc. He refers to Jn 14:19–21. He could not understand how our Lord, in His glorious manifestation after death, would conceal Himself from worldly men, while showing Himself to His disciples.

 Jn 14:23. Our Lord, replying in very general terms, says, that He will manifest Himself to more than His apostles, that “if any one”—no matter who—“love Him,” and—in proof of his love—“keep his word,” His “Father will love him,” in turn, and so will the Son also, as is conveyed in the plural form in next words, “and We will come,” Father and Son; the Holy Ghost also comes, “and make our abode with him,” as guests, in the house of our friend. He will speedily manifest Himself, in His glorified body, to His Apostles after His Resurrection, and He will also specially manifest Himself to all the faithful, during life, by indwelling in them by His grace and communication of heavenly, spiritual and interior gifts. In this verse it is implied, that it is because worldly men do not love Him nor keep His commandments, He does not manifest Himself to them.
Jn 14:24. He here conveys, that many keep not His commandments, because they do not love Him. And to add greater importance to His commandments, and assert the honour of His Father, as is His invariable custom, He says these commandments are not His, “is not Mine,” independently of His Father, who, in communicating His Divine nature, to His Son in His eternal generation, communicated also all knowledge. “In Him were shut up all the treasures of knowledge and wisdom” (Ser. Jn 7:16). Hence, neither the Father nor the Son love the world, nor shall They manifest themselves to it.
Jn 14:25. “Remaining with you.” Conversing in My mortal state with you, who understand the sublimity, as well as the novelty of My doctrines only imperfectly, on account of your rude state of mind.
Jn 14:26. “But the Paraclete,” the Consoler, to whom I referred already (Jn 14:16), “the Holy Ghost,” He now mentions who that Paraclete is, “whom the Father will send in My name” (i.e.), at My entreaty; or on account of My merits. It may also mean, in My place, who am soon to leave you. “He will teach you all things,” causing you to understand clearly what, owing to your rude and imperfect state, you now can hardly understand or apprehend, “and bring to your minds,” on all befitting occasions, in the hour of trial and temptation, He will bring to your mind, what you might forget and lose sight of, and not even apprehend, in order to strengthen and console you.
All things whatever”—pertaining to salvation—“I have said to you,” while remaining here with you, in My visible, mortal state.
Jn 14:27. In this valedictory or leave-taking address, our Lord uses the form of benediction in use among the Jews, when using salutations and leave-taking. “Peace be with you.” This form of words embraced the abundance of all temporal and spiritual blessings. Our Redeemer, in leaving His Apostles peace, gives a never-failing promise of all blessings, especially tranquillity of soul, and holy resignation in the midst of the trials in store for them, and especially in the midst of their sorrows at His approaching death, and departure from them. In these words our Lord employs the general form in use. In the next words He specially applies and emphasizes it. “My peace, I give you.” a solid, abiding, never-ending peace, both to themselves and their successors. His peace embraces reconciliation and friendship with God, tranquillity of conscience, interior joy in one’s self and concord with our brethren. This He bequeaths as His undying inheritance. “Not as the world giveth.” The professions of friendship on the part of worldlings are vain, hollow, and insincere, ever changing and changeable. Worldlings may wish us blessings, but, they cannot confer them; and these blessings, such as wealth, pleasures, enjoyment, are brief and changeable. His peace is solid, enduring, and ever fruitful of priceless blessings, giving grace and help here, which will lead to eternal happiness hereafter.
Let not your heart be troubled,” etc., at my departure, bearing in mind the many motives of consolation I have proposed to you, and the unfailing promises of support and peace I make you in the midst of tribulations.
This is a repetition of the consolatory affectionate language addressed to them (v. 1).
Jn 14:28. “You have heard that I said to you, I go away” (Jn 14:3), “and I come to you” (Jn 14:17-18). This He said, because, He saw them sorrowful at the prospect of His approaching death, as if they would be left destitute, as children without a father, sheep without a shepherd, exposed to the fury of the Jews.

 

I go away”—owing to My death—“and I come to you again,” and shall show Myself visibly, after My resurrection, and also by the manifest protection I shall extend to you in all your trials, from My throne of glory in heaven.
If you loved Me,” with sincere love, unmixed with selfishness, putting your entire trust in Me. He knew they loved Him; still, it was a love mixed with selfishness; nor did they fully understand whither He was going, or the result of it.

 

You would indeed be glad, because I go to the Father.” True love rejoices at the prosperity and advancement of the object loved. They should, therefore, rejoice at seeing Him return to His throne of glory in the bosom of His Father. This would also tend to their benefit, owing to the blessings He would confer on them by establishing the spiritual kingdom of His Church for ever, and delivering His people from their spiritual foes.
For the Father is greater than I,” as man. This is clear if we consider our Lord’s human nature, which was to be glorified by His Father. In this sense, He might say, “I,” considered in My Divine Person, am greater than Myself, considered according to My humanity. “For”—as St. Augustine expresses it—“the form of God which He did not lose, is greater than the form of man, which he assumed.” It is of His humanity he speaks; for, in His Divine nature, He is equal to God (Philip. 2), and it is only in relation to it, He could say, “I go to the Father,” and he does not institute a comparison precisely between His Divine nature and that of the Father; but, between His present lowly condition, in which He was soon to suffer; and the state of glory, He was to resume, when returning to the bosom of His Father. This should be for them, rather a cause of joy than otherwise.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Christ, Notes on the Gospel of John, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Acts 14:5-18

Posted by Dim Bulb on May 2, 2015

ANALYSIS

We have an account of the opposition to the preaching of Paul and Barnabas at Iconium (1–5). Their flight to Lystra and Derbe,—the cure of a cripple (6–9). The insane conduct of the multitude who taking them for Gods prepare to offer them sacrifice (10–13). The loud denunciation by the Apostles of such impiety (13–17).

A14:5. “Assault.” A violent attack (ὁρμή), the effects of which were averted by flight. Others understand it of an intended assault, which the word “understanding” (v. 6) would seem to favour.

“Rulers.” Probably of the Synagogue, to bring them into contempt, and put them to death, probably on a charge of blasphemy (Acts 7:57–59).

Acts 14:6. “Understanding”. Apprized of their danger.

“Lycaonia.” Belonged formerly to Phrygia. Augustus erected it into a separate province.

Acts 14:7. “Sat.” Allusive to his usual posture, “there lived,” “impotent,” &c., deprived of the use of his limbs.

“A cripple,” &c. His condition being so well-known, the miracle could not, therefore, be gainsayed.

Acts 14:8. “Looking” earnestly “upon him.” Seeing from his voice, gesture, countenance, besides being interiorly enlightened by the Holy Ghost. “Faith to be healed.” The necessary faith for recovering his bodily health (Matthew 9:28; Mark 9:22; Luke 9:42). This is like the miracle of St. Peter, in most of the circumstances (3:6–8).

Acts 14:10. “Lycaonian tongue.” Some say a corrupt sort of Greek; others, an admixture of Greek and Syriac. St. Chrysostom thinks the Apostles did not understand it. Hence, their silence at the blasphemous utterances. It was only when they saw the garlands and preparations for sacrifice (13) they denounced it.

“The Gods are come,” &c. The Pagans fancied the Gods visited in human form the places sacred to them. Lystra was dedicated to Jupiter, who, on descending, was said to be accompanied by Mercury, the god of eloquence.

Acts 14:11. “Barnabas, Jupiter.” “Jupiter,” the supreme God, remarkable for power and prowess, was represented as the most powerful of the Gods among the Pagans. To him all the other Gods were subject. Everything but fate yielded to his sway. Commonly termed the father of Gods and men. St. Chrysostom conjectures that Barnabas was majestic in stature, well built, of a powerful frame, advanced in years. Hence, taken for “Jupiter.” Paul was the opposite. Being the “chief speaker,” no doubt eloquent, he was taken for “Mercury,” the God of eloquence, and messenger of the Gods.

Acts 14:12. “Priest of Jupiter.” Charged with worshipping by offering him sacrifices.

“That was,” &c., viz., Jupiter. “Before the city,” of which he was the tutelary deity. His image or temple was located before the gate of the city, in a prominent position, in accordance with Pagan usage.

“Oxen.” The usual sacrifice to Jupiter. “Garlands.” Ribands, adorning the victims.

Acts 14:13. “Had heard.” At their lodgings, being probably informed by some of their converts.

“Rending their clothes.” A mark of intense grief and abhorrence among the Jews (See Matthew 26:65, Commentary on).

Acts 14:14. How different from the unselfish and noble conduct of the Apostles in rejecting the proferred honour was that of the vain Herod Agrippa (12:22, &c.).

“Like you.” Subject to the same passions and infirmities. (This is conveyed by the Greek.) Having the common feelings and propensities of other men, equally needing food, subject to pain, sickness, and death, altogether opposed to the correct notions of the nature of God.

“Preaching to you,” &c. Far from pretending or claiming to be regarded as Gods, we, on the contrary, exhort you to give up the adoration of “these vain things,” these false Gods, idols, unreal beings, who have no real existence, who can neither see, not hear, nor help us, “oculos habent et non videbunt, aures habent et non audient,” &c. (Psalm 113; 1 Kings 12:21). In several parts of Scripture idols are termed vanities (Deut. 32:21; 4 Kings 17:15, &c.).

“Living God.” As distinguished from false divinities. A God “who made the heavens,” &c., and is, therefore, also entitled to supreme worship from His creatures.

Acts 14:15. “Times past.” During the ages before the Gospel dispensation.

“All nations” of the earth except the Jews (Acts 17:30) having “winked at the times of this ignorance” (17:30).

“To walk in their own ways.” Wicked ways of life, so opposed to the ways that lead to God, withholding from them the lights and spiritual helps conferred on the Jews—no written revelation, no occasional visits from the Prophets—and reserved in a particular way for the children of the New Law. The most polished nations were just as unable to rescue themselves from the prison of sin and infidelity as the most barbarous and least cultivated.

Acts 14:16. While leaving the Gentiles to the errors of their ways, imparting no revelation, God did not leave them without the means of knowing Him, without evidence and a knowledge of His existence, of His attributes and claims on their services. His wonderful benefits bore testimony to him.

“Doing good from Heaven.” Continually conferring benefits on the world, especially giving “rain” (the early and better rain) in due seasons. “Rain” is specially a gift from God (3 Kings 8:35; Job 5:10; Psalms 66:8, &c., 146:8), most necessary for human existence. Without it the earth would be dried up and rendered desolate.

“Fruitful seasons.” The earth rendering abundant fruit by God’s ordination corresponding to the labour of the husbandman.

“Filling our hearts,” viz., ourselves. “Hearts,” by a Hebraism, designates the entire person.

“Food.” Necessary for existence. “Gladness.” Resulting from our daily wants having been supplied.

From this, the Apostle leaves it to be inferred, without expressly stating it, that if the Gentiles did not come to the knowledge of God, it was their own fault.

The discourse at Athens, rather lengthy (17:23, 24) and Rom. (1:20–23) are on the same lines with this.

Acts 14:17. Notwithstanding this address dissuading them; still, on account of the miracles, they could hardly be restrained; or, this discourse, coupled with the miracles, convinced the Pagans the more that they were Gods, and, therefore, these foolish people could hardly be restrained.

Acts 14
18. “Certain Jews.” No doubt from among those who rebelled against the Apostle (13:45; 14:5).

“Antioch,” of Pisidia.

“Persuading,” &c. Likely, ascribing the miracle to sorcery and the black art.

“Stoning Paul.” Who was more obnoxious on account of his eloquence (2 Cor. 11:27).

“Drew him out of the city.” Left him there as unworthy of burial.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Notes on Acts of Apostles, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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