The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

Archive for the ‘SERMONS’ Category

Extraordinary Form: Commentaries for Holy Thursday

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 12, 2017

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Roman Missal.

Roman Breviary.

Devout Instructions on the Epistle and Gospel.

COMMENTARIES ON THE EPISTLE: 1 Corinthians 11:20-32.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 1 Cor 11:20-32.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on 1 Cor 11:20-32.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:20-32.

Pending: Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:20-32.

EWTN’s In the Footsteps of St Paul. Listen to episode 8.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 13:1-15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 13:1-15 for the Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper.

St Cyril of Alexandria on John 13:1-15 for the Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper.

Pending: Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on John 13:1-15.

Pending: Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 13:1-15.

Pending: St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 13:1-15.

Pending: St Augustine’s Tractates on John 13:1-15.

St Irenaeus Ministries Podcast on John: The Last Supper.

 

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Extraordinary Form: Commentaries for Wednesday in Holy Week

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 12, 2017

Roman Missal. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

Pending: My Notes on Isaiah 62:11- 63:7.

St Cyril Of Alexandria’s Exegetical Homilies On The Passion Of Luke in 7 Parts:

On Luke 21:37-22:16.  Two homilies in one post.
On Luke 22:17-30.
On Luke 22:31-38.
On Luke 22:39-53.
On Luke 22:54-71.
On Luke 23:1-31.
On Luke 23:32-43.  The last part of this homily has not come down to us.  Likewise, the last few homilies in this series have survived only in fragments, which I have included in this post.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 22:1-23:53. Actually, the commentary begins at verse 14.

Father Donald Senior’s Commentary on Luke in 6 Parts:

1. The Last Supper (Luke 22:1-38).
2. The Hour of Darkness (Luke 22:39-65).
3. Jesus on Trial (Luke 22:66-23:25).
4. The Way of the Cross (Luke 23:26-32).
5. The Death of the Just Man (Luke 23:33-49).
6. Death and Victory (Luke 23:50-56). Site misidentifies the passage as 22:1-38, so don’t let if fool you.

GENERAL POSTS:

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Extraordinary Form: Commentaries and Resources for Palm Sunday (Dominica II Passionis Seu in Palmis)

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 12, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
PASSION SUNDAY
Dominica II Passionis seu in Palmis

General:

Roman Missal. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

All About Palm Sunday.

The History Of Palm Sunday.

Commentaries on Psalm 24 (23): Used during the distribution of the palms.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 24.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 24 (Ps 23). The Latin Vulgate and Greek Septuagint number this psalm 23.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 24.

Part 1: A Patristic Medieval/Commentary on Psalm 24. Verses 1-6.

Part 2: A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 24. Verses 7-10.

Commentaries on Psalm 47 (46): Also used during distribution of the palms.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 47.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Psalm 47. Psalm 46 in his Vulgate translation which followed the Greek Septuagint.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 47. Psalm 46 in the Vulgate.

Commentaries on Matthew 21:1-9: the Palm Procession Reading

Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 21:1-9. Post is actually on verses 1-11.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 21:1-9. On verses 1-11, actually.

Commentaries on Psalm 147: 12-20:

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 147.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary/Meditation on Psalm 147:12-20.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 147:12-20. At the time of posting this site was having difficulties which will hopefully be resolved by Palm Sunday.

Commentaries on the Epistle Reading: Philippians 2:6-11

Father de Piconio’s (de Picquigny”s) Commentary on Philippians 2:6-11.

(1) St John Chrysostom’s First Homiletic on Philippians 2:6-11.

(2) St John Chrysostom’s Second Homiletic on Philippians 2:6-11.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Philippians 2:6-11.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Philippians 2:6-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Philippians 2:6-11.

Word Sunday’s Notes on Philippians 2:6-11.

Haydock Bible Commentary on Philippians 2:6-11.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL READING: Matthew 26:1-27:66.

Part 1: Aquinas’ Commentary on Matthew 26:1-75.

Part 2: Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 27:1-66.

Father Donald Senior on the Passion According to St Matthew (in 6 parts). A synopsis of his famous study THE PASSION OF JESUS IN THE GOSPEL OF MATTHEW.

Homilies and Homily Notes:

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Philippians 2:6. Scroll down slightly to find.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on Matthew 27:35.

The Mental Sufferings of our Lord in His Passion. A homily by St John Henry Cardinal Newman from his Discourses to Mixed congregations.

  • Bishop Fulton J. Sheen.  Three talks delivered on Good Friday in 1977.  These are only lengthy parts of a three hour talk and not the full presentation, nonetheless, they are excellent.

Part 1.
Part 2.
Part 3.

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Extraordinary Form: Commentaries and Resources for Passion Sunday (Dominica I Passionis)

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 12, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
PASSION SUNDAY
Dominica I Passionis

READINGS AND GENERAL RESOURCES:

Roman Missal. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Latin and English side by side. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout instruction on the Epistle and Gospel.

COMMENTARIES ON THE EPISTLE: Hebrews 9:11-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Hebrews 9:11-15.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Hebrews 9:11-15.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on Hebrews 9:11-15.

Aquinas’ Lecture on Hebrews 9:11-15.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 8:46-59.

St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on John 8:46-59.

St Augustine on John 8:46-59.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 8:46-59.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on John 8:46-59.

TEXT HOMILIES, NOTES, OUTLINES:

Homily on the Epistle.

Homily on the Gospel.

The High Priesthood and Sacrifice of Christ. Homily on the Epistle.

Explanation of the Gospel and Lessons From It. Homily on the Epistle.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Homily Notes on the Epistle and Gospel.

MORE PENDING.

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Extraordinary Form: Commentaries and Resources for the Fourth Sunday of Lent (Dominica IV in Quadragesima)

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 6, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT
Dominica IV in Quadragesima

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Roman Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instructions on the Epistle and Gospel.Includes brief explanation of the readings, prayers, and a lesson on how to prepare for Easter.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

COMMENTARIES ON TH EPISTLE: Galatians 4:22-31.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Galatians 4:22-31.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Galatians 4. This is on the entire chapter.

Bernardin de Piconio’s Commentary on Galatians 4:22-31.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: John 6:1-15.

St Augustine on John 6:1-15.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on John 6:1-7.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 6:1-15.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 6:1-15.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 6:1-15.

My Notes on John 6:1-15.

SERMONS AND HOMILIES:

Homily on the Epistle. Prefaced by Epistle reading.

Homily on the Gospel. Prefaced by Gospel reading.

Homily On The Real Presence Of Our Lord Jesus Christ In The Holy Eucharist.

Homily On Frequent communion.

OUTLINES AND NOTES FOR SERMONS AND HOMILIES:

An Outline Of The Epistle Reading. On Gal 4:22-31.Can be used for homily ideas, point of meditation or further study.

Freedom Of The Children Of God.  Sermon outline based on Gal 4:31. Can be used for homily ideas, point of meditation or further study.

Holy Communion.  Sermon outline based on John 6:11. Can be used for homily ideas, point of meditation or further study.

The Gospel Example.  Sermon outline on the three duties taught by today’s Gospel Reading. Can be used for homily ideas, point of meditation or further study.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on the Epistle. Can be used for homily ideas, point of meditation or further study.

John Henry Newman’s Homily Notes on the Epistle Reading. Very brief.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on the Gospel. Can be used for homily ideas,points of meditation or further study.

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Extraordinary Form: Second Sunday of Lent: Commentaries and Resources on the Readings (Dominica II in Quadragesima)

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
SECOND SUNDAY OF LENT
Dominica II in Quadragesima

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

COMMENTARIES ON THE EPISTLE: 1 Thessalonians 4:1-7.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 17:1-9.

Sermons and Homilies:

Sermon and Homily Notes: for sermon/homily ideas, points for meditation or further study.

  • Heaven.  Based upon Matt 17:7.

DOGMATICS AND CATECHESIS: Besides preaching on the transfiguration it was also common to preach on the transforming effects of Holy Communion (Eucharist).

  • RELATING TO THE EPISTLE: 1 Thess 4:1-7. Verses 3-8 of this passage have been and can be variously interpreted as the footnote to 4:3-8 in the NABRE makes clear. Some (Aquinas’ commentary) interpret part of the passage as concerned with greed (e.g., the business practices mentioned by the NABRE footnote). Below I’ve included resources for both adultery (9th commandment) and theft (7th commandment). In addition, I’ve included some resources on the sacrament of marriage.

Catechism of the Council of Trent on the 7th Commandment.

Catechism of the Council of Trent on the 9th & 10th commandments. Starts near middle of page. It should be kept in mind that commandments 9 & 10 are more properly treated of next week.

Manual of Catholic Theology on Matrimony.

J.S Hunter’s Outlines of Dogmatic Theology on Matrimony.

The Sacraments: A dogmatic Treatise on Matrimony.

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma on Holy Matrimony.

God the Teacher of Mankind on Matrimony.

Handbook of Moral Theology on Marriage.

  • RELATING TO THE GOSPEL: Matt 17:1-9.

J.S. Hunter’s Outlines of Dogmatic Theology on the Transfiguration. Brief. .

Aquinas’ Summa Theologia on the Transfiguration.

Catechism of the Council of Trent on the Effects of Holy Communion. This was a common theme for preaching in relation to the transfiguration. The source used here contains the catechism’s teaching followed by two short sermons on the subject.

The Sacraments: A Dogmatic Treatise. Pages 218-234. On the effect of the Eucharist.

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma on the Effects of the Eucharist.

PODCASTS:

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Extraordinary Form: Commentaries for the First Sunday of Lent (Dominica I in Quadragesima)

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
Dominica I in Quadragesima

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Today’s Roman Missal. Latin and English side by side. Make sure you have the correct date set.

Today’s Roman Breviary. Latin and English side by side. Make sure you have the correct date set.

Devout Instructions on the Epistle and Gospel.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: 2 Corinthians 6:1-10.

Cornelius a Lapide on 2 Cor 6:1-10.

Bernardin de Piconio on 2 Cor 6:1-10.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 4:1-11.

Cornelius a Lapide on Matt 4:1-11.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matt 4:1-11.

Juan de Maldonado on Matt 4:1-11.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on the Gospel.

On The Necessity and Utility of Fasting. Online book

Jesus Fasts and Overcomes Satan. Online book.

The Assaults of Satan and the means of rendering them ineffectual. Online book.

What Weapons We Must Use to Overcome Satan. Online Book

The Duty and Value of Fasting. Online book.

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Sexagesima Sunday: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2017

EXTRAORDINARY FORM
Dominica in Sexagesima ~ II. classis

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Roman Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Goffine’s Devout Instructions on the Epistle and Gospel. Readings and prayers from the Mass of the day, with brief instructions on the readings.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: 2 Corinthians 11:19-12:9.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 2 Cor 11:19-12:9.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on 2 Cor 11:19-12:9.

Father Callan’s Commentary on 2 Cor 11:19-12:9.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Luke 8:4-15.

Bishop Knecht’s Practical Commentary on Luke 8:4-15.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on Luke 8:4-15.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 8:4-15.

Link fixed. Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 8:4-15.

CATECHESIS AND DOCTRINAL INSTRUCTIONS:

Doctrinal Instructions on the Angels. Chapter from an online book. It was common to give instructions on the angels for this Sunday inasmuch as an angel of Satan was mentioned in the first reading (2 Cor 12:7), and Satan is mentioned in the Gospel text (Luke 8:12).

The Nature of Angels. Chapter from an online book.

Angels in the World. Chapter from an online book.

Moral Instruction on Fasting and Prayer. From the Catechism of the Council of Trent. On this Sunday it was common to give instruction on fasting and prayer in preparation for the coming of Lent.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

Homily on the Epistle. Prefaced by reading.

In What the Apostle Glories. Homily on the epistle. Prefaced by the reading.

Pope St Gregory the Great’s Homily on the Gospel.

Why the Word of God Has So Little Effect at the Present Time. Homily on the Gospel. Prefaced by the reading (starts near bottom of the page).

The Reading of the Bible. Homily on the gospel.

The Ceremonies at the Preaching of the Word of God. Homily on the gospel.

The Thorns are a Symbol of the Riches and Pleasures of  This Life. Homily on the gospel.

Why the Word of God With Many Christians Yields No Fruit. Homily on the gospel.

What We Must Do So That the Word of God Which Is Preached To Us May Produce Fruit. Homily on the gospel.

The Poor Soil Onto Which the Word of God Generally Falls. Homily on the gospel.

The Word of God. Homily on the gospel.

On the Necessity of Hearing the Word of God in a Sermon. Homily  on the gospel. Scroll down to bottom of page to find the start of the homily.

Our Wisdom. Homily on the gospel.

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St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Philippians 2:1-4

Posted by Dim Bulb on August 5, 2017

But Paul does not so; he calls to our remembrance no carnal, but all of them spiritual benefits. That is, if ye wish to give me any comfort in my temptations, and encouragement in Christ, if any consolation of love, if ye wish to show any communion in the Spirit, if ye have any tender mercies and compassions, fulfil ye my joy. “If any tender mercies and compassions.” Paul speaks of the concord of his disciples as compassion towards himself, thus showing that the danger was extreme, if they were not of one mind. If I can obtain comfort from you, if I can obtain any consolation from our love, if I can communicate with you in the Spirit, if I can have fellowship with you in the Lord, if I can find mercy and compassion at your hands, show by your love the return of all this. All this have I gained, if ye love one another.

Ver. 2. “Fulfil ye my joy.”

That the exhortation might not seem to be made to people who were still deficient, see how he says not, “do me joy,” but “fulfil my joy”; that is, Ye have begun to plant it in me, ye have already given me some portion of peacefulness, but I desire to arrive at its fulness? Say, what wouldest thou? that we deliver thee from dangers? that we supply somewhat to thy need? Not so, but “that ye be of the same mind, having the same love,” in which ye have begun, “being of one accord, of one mind.” Just see, how often he repeats the same thing by reason of his great affection! “That ye be of the same mind,” or rather, “that ye be of one mind.” For this is more than “the same.”

“Having the same love.” That is, let it not be simply about faith alone, but also in all other things; for there is such a thing as to be of the same mind, and yet not to have love. “Having the same love,” that is, love and be loved alike; do not thou enjoy much love, and show less love, so as to be covetous even in this matter; but do not suffer it in thyself. “Of one accord,” he adds, that is, appropriating with one soul, the bodies of all, not in substance, for that is impossible, but in purpose and intention. Let all things proceed as from one soul. What means “of one accord”? He shows when he says “of one mind.” Let your mind be one, as if from one soul.

Ver. 3. “Doing nothing through faction.”

He finally demands this of them, and tells1 them the way how this may be. “Doing nothing through faction or vainglory.” This, as I always say, is the cause of all evil. Hence come fightings and contentions. Hence come envyings and strifes. Hence it is that love waxes cold, when we love the praise of men, when we are slaves to the honor which is paid by the many, for it is not possible for a man to be the slave of praise, and also a true servant of God. How then shall we flee vainglory? for thou hast not yet told us the way. Listen then to what follows.

“But in lowliness of mind, each counting other better than himself.” Oh how full of true wisdom, how universal a gathering-word2 of our salvation is the lesson he has put forth! If thou deemest, he means, that another is greater than thyself, and persuadest thyself so, yea more, if thou not only sayest it, but art fully assured of it, then thou assignest him the honor, and if thou assignest him the honor, thou wilt not be displeased at seeing him honored by another. Do not then think him simply greater than thyself, but “better,” which is a very great superiority, and thou dost not think it strange nor be pained thereby, if thou seest him honored. Yea, though he treat thee with scorn, thou dost bear it nobly, for thou hast esteemed him greater than thyself. Though he revile thee, thou dost submit. Though he treat thee ill, thou bearest it in silence. For when once the soul is fully assured that he is greater, it falls not into anger when it is ill-treated by him, nor yet into envy, for no one would envy those who are very far above himself, for all things belong to his superiority.

Here then he instructs the one party to be thus minded. But when he too, who enjoys such honor from thee, is thus affected toward thee, consider what a double wall there is erected of gentle forbearance [comp. Phil. 4:5]; for when thou esteemest him thus worthy of honor, and he thee likewise, no painful thing can possibly arise; for if this conduct when shown by one is sufficient to destroy all strife, who shall break down the safeguard, when it is shown by both? Not even the Devil himself. The defense is threefold, and fourfold, yea manifold, for humanity is the cause of all good; and that you may learn this, listen to the prophet, saying, “Hadst thou desired sacrifice, I would have given it: Thou wilt not delight in burnt offerings. The sacrifice for God is a broken spirit, a broken and a contrite heart God will not despise.”1 (Ps. 51:16, 17.) Not simply humility, but intense humility. As in the case of bodily substances, that which is “broken” will not rise against that which is “solid,” but, how many ills soever it may suffer, will perish itself rather than attack the other, so too the soul, even if constantly suffering ill, will choose rather to die, than to avenge itself by attack.

How long shall we be puffed up thus ridiculously? For as we laugh, when we see children drawing themselves up, and looking haughty, or when we see them picking up stones and throwing them, thus too the haughtiness2 of men belongs to a puerile intellect, and an unformed mind. “Why are earth and ashes proud?” (Ecclus. 10:9.) Art thou highminded, O man? and why? tell me what is the gain? Whence art thou highminded against those of thine own kind? Dost not thou share the same nature? the same life? Hast not thou received like honor from God? But thou art wise? Thou oughtest to be thankful, not to be puffed up. Haughtiness is the first act of ingratitude, for it denies3 the gift of grace. He that is puffed up, is puffed up as if he had excelled by his own strength, and he who thinks he has thus excelled is ungrateful toward Him who bestowed that honor. Hast thou any good? Be thankful to Him who gave it. Listen to what Joseph said, and what Daniel. For when the king of Egypt sent for him, and in the presence of all his host asked him concerning that matter in which the Egyptians, who were most learned in these things, had forsaken the field, when he was on the point of carrying off everything from them, and of appearing wiser than the astrologers, the enchanters, the magicians, and all the wise men of those times, and that from captivity and servitude, and he but a youth (and his glory was thus greater, for it is not the same thing to shine when known, and contrary to expectation, so that its being unlooked for rendered him the more admirable); what then, when he came before Pharaoh? Was it “Yea, I know”? But what? When no one urged it on him, he said from his own excellent spirit, “Do not interpretations belong to God?”4 Behold he straightway glorified his Master, therefore he was glorified. And this also is no small thing. For that God had revealed it to him was a far greater thing than if he had himself excelled. For he showed that his words were worthy of credit, and it was a very great proof of his intimacy with God. There is no one thing so good as to be the intimate friend of God. “For if,” says the Scripture, “he [Abraham] was justified by works, he hath whereof to glory, but not toward God.” (Rom. 4:2.) For if he who has been vouchsafed grace maketh his boast in God, that he is loved of Him, because his sins are forgiven, he too that worketh hath whereof to boast, but not before God, as the other (for it5 is a proof of our excessive weakness); he who has received wisdom of God, how much more admirable is he? He glorifies God and is glorified of Him, for He says, “Them that honor Me, I will honor.” (1 Sam. 2:30.)

Again, listen to him who descended from Joseph, than whom no one was wiser. “Art thou wiser,”6 says he, “than Daniel?” (Ezek. 28:3.) This Daniel then, when all the wise men that were in Babylon, and the astrologers moreover, the prophets, the magicians, the enchanters, yea when the whole of their wisdom was not only coming to be convicted, but to be wholly destroyed (for their being destroyed was a clear proof that they had deceived before), this Daniel coming forward, and preparing to solve the king’s question, does not take the honor to himself, but first ascribes the whole to God, and says, “But as for me, O king, it is not revealed to me for any wisdom that I have beyond all men.” (Dan. 2:30.) And “the king worshiped him, and commanded that they should offer an oblation.” (Dan. 2:46.) Seest thou his humility? seest thou his excellent spirit? seest thou this habit of lowliness? Listen also to the Apostles, saying at one time, “Why fasten ye your eyes on us, as though by our own power or godliness we had made this man to walk? (Acts 3:12.) And again, “We are men of like passions with you.” (Acts 14:15.) Now if they thus refused the honors paid them, men who by reason of the humility and power of Christ wrought greater deeds than Christ (for He says, “He that believeth in Me shall do greater works than those that I do” (John 14:12, abr.)), shall not we wretched and miserable men do so, who cannot even beat away gnats,1 much less devils? who have not power to benefit a single man, much less the whole world, and yet think so much of ourselves that the Devil himself is not like us?

There is nothing so foreign to a Christian soul as haughtiness. Haughtiness, I say, not boldness nor courage, for these are congenial. But these are one thing, and that another; so too humility is one thing, and meanness, flattery, and adulation another.

I will now, if you wish, give you examples of all these qualities. For these things which are contraries, seem in some way to be placed near together, as the tares to the wheat, and the thorns to the rose. But while babes might easily be deceived, they who are men in truth, and are skilled in spiritual husbandry, know how to separate what is really good from the bad. Let me then lay before you examples of these qualities from the Scriptures. What is flattery, and meanness, and adulation? Ziba flattered2 David out of season, and falsely slandered his master. (2 Sam. 16:1–3.) Much more did Ahitophel flatter Absalom. (2 Sam. 17:1–4.) But David was not so, but he was humble. For the deceitful are flatterers, as when they say, “O king, live for ever.” (Dan. 2:4.) Again, what flatterers the magicians are.

We shall find much to exemplify this in the case of Paul in the Acts. When he disputed with the Jews he did not flatter them, but was humble-minded (for he knew how to speak boldly), as when he says, “I, brethren, though I had done nothing against the people, or the customs of our fathers, yet was delivered prisoner from Jerusalem.” (Acts 28:17.)

That these were the words of humility, listen how he rebukes them in what follows, “Well spake the Holy Ghost, By hearing ye shall hear, and shall in nowise understand, and seeing ye shall see, and in nowise perceive.” (Acts 28:25; ib. 26.)

Seest thou his courage? Behold also the courage of John the Baptist, which he used before Herod; when he said, “It is not lawful for thee to have thy brother Philip’s wife.” (Mark 6:18) This was boldness, this was courage. Not so the words of Shimei, when he said, “Begone, thou man of blood” (2 Sam. 16:7), and yet he too spake with boldness; but this is not courage, but audacity, and insolence, and an unbridled tongue. Jezebel too reproached Jehu, when she said, “The slayer of his master” (2 Kings 9:31), but this was audacity, not boldness. Elias too reproached, but this was boldness and courage; “I do not trouble Israel, but thou and thy father’s house.” (1 Kings 18:18.) Again, Elias spake with boldness to the whole people, saying, “How long will ye go lame on both your thighs?” (1 Kings 18:21, LXX.) Thus to rebuke was boldness and courage. This too the prophets did, but that other was audacity.

Would you see words both of humility and not of flattery,3 listen to Paul, saying, “But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man’s judgment; yea, I judge not mine own self. For I know nothing against myself, yet am I not hereby justified.” (1 Cor. 4:3, 4.) This is of a spirit that becomes a Christian; and again, “Dare any of you, having a matter against his neighbor, go to law before the unrighteous, and not before the saints”? (1 Cor. 6:1.)

Would you see the flattery of the foolish Jews? listen to them, saying, “We have no king but Cæsar.” (John 19:15.) Would you see humility? listen to Paul again, when he says, “For we preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus as Lord, and ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake.” (2 Cor. 4:5.) Would you see both flattery and audacity? “Audacity” (1 Sam. 25:10) in the case of Nabal, and “flattery” (1 Sam. 23:20.) in that of the Ziphites? For in their purpose they betrayed David. Would you see “wisdom” (1 Sam. 26:5–12) and not flattery, that of David, how he got Saul into his power, and yet spared him? Would you see the flattery of those who murdered Mephibosheth,1 whom also David slew? In fine, and as it were in outline, to sum up all, audacity is shown when one is enraged, and insults another for no just cause, either to avenge himself, or in some unjust way is audacious; but boldness and courage are when we dare to face perils and deaths, and despise friendships and enmities for the sake of what is pleasing to God. Again, flattery and meanness are when one courts another not for any right end, but hunting after some of the things of this life; but humility, when one does this for the sake of things pleasing to God, and descends from his own proper station that he may perform something great and admirable. If we know these things, happy are we if we do them. For to know them is not enough. For Scripture says, “Not the hearers of a law, but the doers of a law shall be justified.” (Rom. 2:13.) Yea, knowledge itself condemneth, when it is without action and deeds of virtue. Wherefore that we may escape the condemnation, let us follow after the practice, that we may obtain those good things that are promised to us, by the grace and love of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Christ, fathers of the church, Notes on Philippians, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture, SERMONS, St John Chrysostom | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Fifth Sunday After Epiphany: Commentaries and Resources on the Mass Readings (Dominica V Post Epiphaniam)

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 31, 2017

MISSAL AND BREVIARY:

Daily Romans Missal. Be sure correct date is set.

Roman Breviary. Be sure correct date is set.

Devout Instruction On The Epistles and Gospels.  Online book, scroll down to middle of page. Contains the readings with brief instructions, prayers. You can use the site’s zoom feature to increase text size for easier reading.

COMMENTARIES ON THE LESSON: Colossians 3:12-17.

Father Callan’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

Father de Piconio’s Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Colossians 3:12-17.

COMMENTARIES ON THE GOSPEL: Matthew 13:24-30.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

Father Maas’ Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30. On 24-43.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Matthew 13:24-30.

St John Chrysostom’s Homiletic Commentary on Matthew 13:24-30.

HOMILIES AND HOMILY NOTES:

Epistle Homily. Bishop Bonomelli.

Epistle Homily: Homiletic Sketch: Charity, the Bond of Perfection. Fr. Johann Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Homiletic Sketch: The Parable of the Wheat and the Cockle. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Dogmatic Sketch: The Sanctity of the Church. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Liturgical Sketch: How the Early Christians Celebrated Sunday. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Symbolic Sketch: Sin, A Sleep. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Moral Sketch: Why God Suffers the Wicked Among the Good. Fr. Zollner.

Gospel Homily: Moral Sketch: Lukewarmness. Fr. Zollner.

Homily on the Gospel. Bishop Bonomelli.

St Augustine’s Homily on Matthew 13:24-30.

St John Chrysostom’s Homily on Matthew 13:24-30. Same as the one listed under commentaries on the gospel.

Posted in Bible, Catholic, Catholic lectionary, Extraordinary Form, Latin Mass Notes, Notes on the Lectionary, Scripture, SERMONS | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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