The Divine Lamp

The unfolding of thy words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple…Make thy face shine upon thy servant, and teach me thy statutes

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Commentaries for Lectionary Year II

Posted by Dim Bulb on November 4, 2017

ADVENT SEASON

First Week of Advent.
Second Week of Advent.
Third Week of Advent.
Fourth Week of Advent.

CHRISTMAS SEASON TO EPIPHANY
Note: Traditionally Epiphany is celebrated on January 6. In the USA it is celebrated on the Sunday following January 6.

Dec. 25. Vigil Mass for the Solemnity of the Nativity of the Lord (Dec 24).
Dec. 25. Mass During the Night: The Nativity of the Lord (Midnight Mass).
Dec. 25. Mass at Dawn: The Nativity of the Lord.
Dec. 25. Mass During the Day: The Nativity of the Lord.

Sunday Within the Octave of Christmas (Feast of the Holy Family). If a Sunday does not fall between Dec. 26 and Dec 31 then the Feast of the Holy Family is celebrated on Dec. 30.

Dec. 26. The Feast of St Stephen, the Church’s First Martyr.
Dec. 27. The Feast of St John, Apostle and Evangelist.
Dec 28. Feast of the Holy Innocents, Martyrs.
Dec. 29. Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas.
Dec. 30. Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas. See next note.
!!! Dec 30. Feast of the Holy Family (Non-Sunday). If a Sunday does not fall between Dec 26-31 then the Feast of the Holy Family is celebrated on this date.
Jan 1. Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God.
Jan. 2. Memorial of St Basil the Great and St Gregory Nanzianzen, Bishops and Doctors of the Church.
Jan. 3. Christmas Weekday.
Jan . 4. Memorial St Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious.
Jan. 5. Memorial of St John Nuemann, Bishop.
Jan. 6. Christmas Weekday. Traditionally this is Epiphany. In the USA the Epiphany is celebrated on the first Sunday after Jan 6. For commentary on the Epiphany readings see below, following Jan 8.
Jan. 7. Christmas Weekday. NOTE: in 2018 this date falls on the Sunday after Jan 6. IN the USA this Sunday is celebrated as the Epiphany. See the link for the Epiphany below, following Jan 8.
Jan 8.

!!! The Epiphany of the Lord.

ORDINARY TIME, INCLUDING THE BAPTISM OF THE LORD
Note: Scroll down for the seasons that interrupt Ordinary Time.

First Week in Ordinary Time, Year II. Includes the Baptism of the Lord.
Second Week in Ordinary Time, Year II.
Third Week in Ordinary Time, Year II.
Fourth Week in Ordinary Time, Year II.
Fifth Week in Ordinary Time, Year II.
Sixth Week in Ordinary Time, Year II. In 2018 the Lenten season begins during this week. See LENT below.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 7, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 7
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 5:14-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 5:14-21.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 149.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 149.

Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Robert Bellarmine’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 149.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Homiletic Commentary on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Lecture on John 2:1-11.

Aquinas’ Homily Notes on John 2:1.

Father MacRory’s Commentary on John 2:1-11.

My Notes on John 2:1-11. On 1-12.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 2:1-11.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 6, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 6
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings. Note: There are 2 gospel readings to chose from today. I’ve only posted on the first alternate (Mk 1:7-11).

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 Jn 5:5-13.

St Augustine on 1 Jn 5:5-13. Only on verses 7 & 8.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 Jn 5:5-13.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 147 in Two Parts:

St Albert the Great’s Commentary on Psalm 147.

1 Alt. Catholic Scripture Manual on Mark 1:7-11.

1 Alt. Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Mark 1:7-11.

1 Alt . Navarre Bible Commentary on Mark 1:7-11.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 5, Memorial of St John Neumann, Bishop

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 5
MEMORIAL OF ST JOHN NEUMANN BISHOP

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:11-21.

St Augustine on 1 John 3:11-21.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:11-21.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 100.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 100.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:43-51.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:43-51.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:43-51. Scroll down to lecture 16.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:43-51.

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 4, Memorial of Elizabeth Ann Seton

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 4
MEMORIAL OF ST ELIZABETH ANN SETON, RELIGIOUS

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

Father Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

St Augustine on 1 John 3:7-10.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 3:7-10.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:35-42.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:35-42. Scroll down and read lecture 15.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:35-42.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on John 1:35-42.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:35-42.

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Commentaries for the Mass Readings for January 3, Christmas Weekday

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 3
CHRISTMAS WEEKDAY

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Father MacEvily’s Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

St Augustine’s Homily on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:29-3:6.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

Father MacIntyre’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:29-34.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:29-34.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lecture on John 1:29-34. Scroll down and read lecture 14.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:29-34.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on Today’s Gospel (John 1:29-34).

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Commentaries on the Mass Readings for January 2

Posted by Dim Bulb on October 8, 2017

JANUARY 2
MEMORIAL OF SAINT BASIL THE GREAT AND SAINT GREGORY NANZIANZEN, BISHOPS AND DOCTORS OF THE CHURCH

Today’s Mass Readings.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:22-28.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 98.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 98.

A Patristic/Medieval Commentary on Psalm 98.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 98.

Father MacIntryre’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Fathers Nolan’s and Brown’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Father Callan’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

St Cyril of Alexandria’s Commentary on John 1:19-28.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on John 1:19-28.

St Thomas Aquinas’ Lectures on John 1:19-28. Scroll down and read lectures 12 & 13.

Navarre Bible Commentary on John 1:19-28.

A Lectio Divina Meditation on John 1:19-28. Prayer and reflection on the Gospel in the Carmelite tradition.

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Commentaries for the Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

Today’s Mass Readings.

St Augustine on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:12-17.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’s Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:36-40.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:36-40.

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Commentaries for the Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas

Posted by Dim Bulb on September 23, 2017

Today’s Mass Readings.

Father MacEvilly’s Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

Cornelius a Lapide’s Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

St Augustine on 1 John 2:3-11.

Navarre Bible Commentary on 1 John 2:3-11.

Father Boylan’s Introduction to Psalm 96.

St Augustine’ Notes on Psalm 96.

Pope John Paul II’s Commentary on Psalm 96.

Aquinas’ Catena Aurea on Luke 2:22-35.

Navarre Bible Commentary on Luke 2:22-35.

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Father Maldonado’s Commentary on Matthew 18:1-5, 10

Posted by Dim Bulb on July 4, 2017

Verse 1. At that hourABOUT that time, sub idem tempus; a Hebraism. S. Mark 9:33 says that Christ anticipated the Apostles and asked what they disputed of in the way. They had disputed which of them should be the greatest. S. Luke 9:46 says that Jesus, knowing their thoughts, did not ask them, but took a child, and said: Whosoever shall receive this child in My name receiveth Me, and whosoever receiveth Me receiveth Him that sent Me. For he that is the lesser among you all, he is the greater. Of this kind of contention, S. Augustin, on the passage (De Consens., ii. 61), is silent. S. Chrysostom and Euthymius say that the Apostles disputed, not once, but frequently, on the subject. (1) In the way. (2) In the house, when they saw Peter preferred to them in the payment of the tribute. (3) When Christ asked them what they disputed of in the way.

It has been doubted on what occasion they asked this. S. Jerome, Bede, and Euthymius think that it was when they saw Christ pay the tribute for Himself and Peter. Others differ, because it appears from S. Mark 9:33 that they had had their thoughts on the subject in the way before they came to Capernaum and the tribute had been paid; but we have said from S. Chrysostom and Euthymius that they had frequently and on different occasions discussed the question. The payment of the tribute, therefore, did not put the thought into their minds, but only strengthened that which was in them already. For there had been often occasions before. They had seen Peter, with two others, go up the mountain with Christ, and the keys of the kingdom of heaven given to him (Matt 16:19), as again S. Chrysostom and Euthymius say. Others give another and not unacceptable reason that they had heard Christ often speak of His death as being now very near at hand, and wondered which of them would be, so to speak, His heir that is, His vicar after His death. This is very agreeable to human nature and custom, when men stand around those who are at the point of death, with thoughts of their succession. The Apostles seem to have done this on the eve of Christ s Passion (S. Luke 22:24).

Who thinkest thou. The comparative is put for the superlative, and the present for the future, by a Greek idiom, as if it were written, Which of us is to be the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?

In the kingdom of heaven. Some, as SS. Chrysostom and Epiphanius, take these words to mean the kingdom of heaven itself, and the celestial glory, which from verse 3 seems probable. It is credible that Christ answered the Apostles about the same kingdom of heaven as they spoke of.

But it is more likely that in this instance the Church is termed the kingdom of heaven (1) From the cause of their asking the question when they saw Peter in every respect preferred, and they thought that he would be the head of all the Church; (2) From their having been blamed by Christ when He rebuked their ambition. To wish to be the first in the kingdom of heaven is love, not ambition; but to wish to be first in the Church, and to be placed over others, was to incur blame as being ambitious. This may be proved from verse 3, where the contrary opinion is approved. For Christ would say that he who is least in the present kingdom of heaven that is, the Church should be accounted greatest, and should, therefore, be the greatest in heaven. So speaks S. Luke of the present kingdom of the Church (S. Luke 9:48). Christ therefore plays on the ambiguity of the words, when He says, Except ye be converted, as we have observed that He has often done before.

Verse 2. And Jesus calling to Him a little child. Some think that it was an infant, because S. Mark says that Christ took him up in His arms (S. Mark 9:35; 10:6). But they are in error. For a child larger than an infant may be small enough to be taken up in arms, and this child was able to walk. Christ then called, not an infant, but a child, and an innocent one, and placed him in the midst, that, as has been observed by S. Chrysostom, he might teach humility, not in words, but by actual facts.

Verse 3. Unless you be converted. It has been erroneously inferred from these words that the Apostles were then in a state of mortal sin, because Christ said except, as if they were not able to enter the kingdom of heaven at that time. Christ meant simply that they could not enter it themselves unless they were like children in simplicity and humility. This is not to be understood as if a humility and simplicity equal to that of children were required in all men. For if so, who would ever enter the kingdom of heaven? But the greatest example of humility is put forward, not that we may wholly come up to it, but that we may approach as near to it as we possibly can. So we are commanded to be perfect as our Father in heaven is perfect (S. Matt 5:48). Nor is it intended that the Apostles had not such humility as would enable them to enter the kingdom of heaven; but they have what is required shown to them, that if they have it not, they may gain it, and if they have it, they may keep it. The expression, unless you become, &c., does not mean that they were not such then. It alludes to their age, that as they are fully grown now, they should become as little children, as Christ said to Nicodemus (S. John 3:3).

But Christ blamed the ambition of the Apostles. Granted. It does not follow, however, that it was such as to be a mortal sin, or to hinder them from entering the kingdom of heaven; for it might be venial, and it is right that we should believe it to have been such. The Apostles, therefore, are to be excused by this or some other better reason, as S. Chrysostom excuses them, not blamed. Christ commands us to be like children, not in all things, but in simplicity, in humility, and in innocence, as S. Paul (1 Cor 14:20), as say S. Clement of Alexandria (Pædag., i. 5), S. Ambrose (Serm. x.).

Verse 5. And he that shall receive one such little child. The reason of Christ’s saying this may easily be gathered from what has gone before and from what follows. He would prove that he is the greatest who most resembles the least, because a child is most like Himself and bears His Person. He proves this by the fact that whoever receives a child receives Him. But to receive does not only mean, as some think, to receive Him into our houses, but to follow this up by every kind of well-doing in our power: in a word, to do good, as He will say in the judgment (Matt 25:40). S. Mark and S. Luke relate only this part of Christ’s conversation, omitting what S. Matthew has added. Probably because in this lay the sum of the whole matter.

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